Advertisements

Archive

Tag Archives: Marketing

ValueCheck Inkjet Printing.001

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value Communication AG

Hardly a day goes by without manufacturers promising printers that inkjet printing is the measure of all things and will open up new markets and profits. Are they right? Well, yes and no. 

Yes, because the inkjet process is no longer just about printing on paper or cardboard, and thus extends beyond the scope of conventional printing; it is even possible to print on three-dimensional objects, as Heidelberger Druckmaschinen and Xerox are proving with their new systems.

No, because it is simply not true to say that inkjet printing could replace offset printing or open up entirely new areas of application for the printing industry off the cuff.

It is absolutely necessary to look closely and weigh up carefully to avoid finding yourself worshiping a golden calf. Here is a selection of my current observations: 

  1. Inkjet printing for professional, highly productive printing is relatively new. To date, the number of successful users in the printing industry can be counted on one hand. In all of their cases, the key to success was not to focus on printing technology, but on pre-media processes and finishing/processing with the inclusion of logistics/distribution. The best example: Peter Sommer and Elanders Germany in Waiblingen.
  2. Large inkjet printing volumes, which manufacturers like to invoke, have long been found in transactional printing. Here, processing and distribution can be seamlessly designed with IT expertise and automation. (Incidentally, this is the reason why a big player like Pitney Bowes got into the marketing of digital printing technology).
  3. Manufacturers are using inkjet printing to attract new customer groups outside the printing industry and transactional printing. Following drupa 2016, Canon Europe launched a new business unit as part of its reorganization, making it a pioneer in this regard. The Canon Graphic & Communications Group is introducing the creative industries as well as countless other industries, such as architects, craftsmen, etc., to inkjet printing with new systems.
  4. Since drupa 2016, it has become apparent for manufacturers that the inkjet revolution is devouring its own children. HP is making an appearance and Landa is getting nowhere fast, Bobst has made an about-turn and, with the founding of Mouvent AG, rethought inkjet printing with a clever cluster technology and much more. Heidelberg has teamed up with Fujifilm to develop Primefire: a breakthrough platform for high-quality inkjet printing that has caused a stir in the demanding packaging market. 
  5. Traditional companies such as the Durst Group have repositioned themselves: everything is aligned and optimized with the P5 philosophy, which maximizes the performance and availability of the printing systems and allows unprecedented flexibility in media and order processing. Incidentally, Durst’s innovations were a highlight at the Online Print Symposium 2018 in Munich. 
  6. Entirely new providers have quietly got themselves into position, making individually configurable, modular inkjet printing production facilities possible with new system architectures, as the company Cadis Engineering from Hamburg demonstrates. Cadis can print HTML data and dispenses with ripping, for example.
  7. The real winner in inkjet printing is currently a hidden champion: Book printing. Xerox Europe impressively demonstrated this in an impressive manner at the end of March in cooperation with Book on Demand GmbH at the #Books2018 event in Hamburg. A huge, automated print factory generates up to 25,000 book-for-one products per day in real time. The growth drivers are the Xerox Impika inkjet printing systems with sophisticated Hunkeler and Müller-Martini processing technology. The key feature is a new Impika ink that can easily print on uncoated papers to the best possible degree.
  8. Last but not least: If one can speak of massive substitution, then inkjet printing systems (sheet as well as roll) will most likely replace existing toner digital printing systems.

 

ValueCheck Peter Sommer Elanders ENG.001

Peter Sommer, Digital Printing and Inkjet Pioneer, Elanders Group: “The Elanders concept isn’t fixed to a specific printing technique. The central issues are always what the product needs to achieve and how it gets to the recipient. Integration into the supply chain begins with advising customers and ends with tailor-made logistics.”


Conclusion

There is still a lot that has to be done when it comes to inkjet printing. We’re only just beginning, and will have to learn how to think again in order not to fall into the innovation trap, where we wrongly assume that the primary purpose of inkjet printing is to improve on what we can do in print anyway.

When it comes to mastering the complex communication challenges of the digital age, it’s less about ‘faster, better, cheaper’ and more about ‘new, up-to-date and different’. — Think different!

 


About the author

Andreas Weber is founder and CEO of Value Communication AG. An analyst and consultant for success with print in the digital age, he is also a global networker and publicist. His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires users/readers from over 130 countries.

 


 

Advertisements

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 15.14.55.png

What does a brand mean to a consumer?
What does a consumer mean to a brand?

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value. |  German Version

Many brands boast that they “create worlds of experience for our customers.” The question I ask myself is: do brands still meet the momentum which really determines customer needs, or rather: customer satisfaction? Or does an increasingly enforced brand experience approach not just miss the mark, but create more frustration than enjoyment?

Preliminary remark: learn from the best! Before any initial questions can be answered, looking back will help to bring us forward (‘Back to the Future’ style). Apple is a prime example to learn from. In the mid-90s, the company was at an all-time low, almost to the point of bankruptcy. Despite this, they managed a turnaround. Today, Apple has been the world’s most valuable brand for years. How was this possible? — “Communication first” was a central statement of the legendary Steve Jobs at the ‘Apple confidential meeting’ on September 23, 1997. 

With the “Think Different” Campaign he launched shortly afterwards, he initiated a tremendous upheaval in the industrial industry. 10 years later, they went on to break the sound barrier with the release of the iPhone. Since then, Apple as been making a higher per capita profit than most companies in terms of per capita sales. 

Although Jobs emphasized that products, marketing and distribution are important, he put smart communication above all else and made it a top priority. With his iPhone presentation on January 9, 2007, he achieved an ad-hoc gain of around $1 billion (media coverage, share price growth) before the product was even on the shelves. The trick: Jobs personally demonstrated the new device in great detail, and thus made himself identifiable with his customers and their new experience possibilities. 

The credo: Smart Communication puts the central focus on the customer experience. This has made the pioneer Apple the number one premium brand to date. As an iCEO, Jobs was also a dedicated Chief Communications Officer, which enabled his ideas to become part of the DNA of Apple, its partners and, in particular, its customers. This is a principle to which other companies, such as Berkshire Hathaway by Warren Buffett or Virgin by Richard Branson presumably also owe their success.

 

 

In my opinion, Apple is by far the most capable Smart Communication Company — and that includes maximum loyalty to their customers around the globe. 

 


Personal note: Anyone who buys an Apple product can experience
this — I’ve just bought the new iMac 27” with a Retina 5K Display and a MagicTrackPad. From (online) procurement including leasing to
free-of-charge delivery, the incredibly easy setup (just unpacking the iMac is a beautifully designed experience) up to the iCloud registration following Apple’s welcome email — which offered the very best professional support — the new computer seamlessly became a part of both my personal and professional life. This includes marvelous surprises, numerous technical innovations and quality features at the highest level. In conclusion: benchmark!


 

So let’s ask ourselves:
What distinguishes customer experience from brand experience?

Learning from the best: If you take a closer look, Apple and many other of the world’s most valuable brands follow a similar principle. Google, Facebook, Amazon, Uber and Airbnb – all of which are highly successful companies of recent times – have internalized and practiced the customer experience principle. 

Experts like to claim that their success is due to the superior innovative platform business model. To an extent, in my opinion, this is true: exponential growth is possible with this model, as you are able to address millions, even billions, of customers directly. However, business model innovations, as well as new digital technologies, are ‘only’ a means to an end — and not necessarily a guarantee of success. 

Think different!

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 10.27.11

 

Consideration 1

It is crucial to exploit the innovation and technology mechanisms in such a way that dialogues or conversations with customers take place in real time. This enables us to perfect services and create products that are tailored to the customer’s needs. Smart Communication ensures all of this!!

Consideration 2

The brand itself is no longer the center of attention; instead, it rather becomes a common vehicle for companies and customers. Mass Marketing becomes Customized Mass Marketing. The majority of established brand companies put their focus on brand experience in order to impress customers with the strongest possible brand impact. This is a way to impress your customers with the strongest possible brand experience and thus induce them to buy your products. However, the best case scenario in this: you end up covering your costs, but you can barely manage to grow profitably and organically or achieve double-digit margins.

Consideration 3

Reality is inevitable: customers often feel more and more disappointed if they feel that brands have lost personal contact with them.

 


 

Adobe’s study, Reinventing Loyalty: The New Loyalty Experience (Fall 2017) found that 75% of CMOs admit that customer loyalty/customer satisfaction need to be improved, or that they don’t even know what their customers are dealing with. “This clearly demonstrates that CMOs feel that there is huge room for improvement when it comes to implementing new loyalty dimensions.” 

 

In my opinion, these new “loyalty dimensions” are entrenched in “old” values: trust, satisfaction, and relatedness. These values also form the core of Smart Communication. 

In this context: The usual “digital” transformation efforts of many companies miss the point. Instead of focusing on customer experience, many companies focus instead on the optimization of internal processes. 

While these do save the company time and money, they tend to drastically increase time and effort for the customer. Personal, human-to-human consultation opportunities are thus almost impossible. Anyone who’s spent far too much time on hold knows what I’m talking about.

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 10.27.48

 

Consideration 4

In my view, in order to avoid customer dissatisfaction and loss of loyalty, it is not necessarily a matter of changing qualifications, but of changing the mandate of those responsible for marketing. 

Why?

  • Brand experience puts the focus on buying. It mainly uses expensive media and creative services from third parties (although Nielsen reports that in Germany, Europe’s premium market in 2017, gross advertising expenditure declined in some cases, despite high growth in mobile advertising). The corresponding strategies and measures are aimed at, almost as if on a hunt, bombarding customers with advertising, anywhere, anytime. So-called bonus programs make the hunt all the more dynamic.
  • But: Customer Experience, on the other hand, relies on customer satisfaction and service, through methods of direct contact and dialogue. Customer Experience follows the principle of ‘Listen & Learn.’ Real-time capturing of customers experiences is used to continuously improve products and services. Communication and transaction are interlinked as closely as possible, preferably seamlessly. The credo: It’s all about interaction and relatedness by smart communication.

Consideration 5

The Brand Experience Principle no longer applies. Customer sensitivities and expectations can best be met with an individually-tailored Smart Communication architecture, which should be designed with a customer experience focus. 

If the Smart Communication strategy, which is so successful for Apple, is structured in a systemic way, adapted to your company, and precisely understood in detail, the essence of Smart Communication, you will be able to respond extremely quickly to individual customer needs. There is no other choice! ‘Communication first’ thus goes hand in hand with ‘Customer benefits first.’

 


 

Instructions 

  1. Think different! Put your current branding and customer experience strategies to the test and discuss your findings with others. 
  2. Rethink and critically assess the values of your company’s current communication approach and processes (i. e. via the ValueCheck questionnaire).
  3. Listen & Learn. Understand and use the insights that my White Paper on Smart Communication offers, including specific instructions for action and organizational models. 
  4. I am always available for further explanations and support.

 


 

About Andreas Weber, Founder and CEO of Value Communication AG
Since more than 25 years Andreas Weber serves on an international level as a business communication analyst, influencer and transformer. His activities are dedicated to the ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ via presentations, management briefings, coachings, workshops, analysis&reports, strategic advice. — Andreas Weber’s Blog inspires readers from around 130 countries around the globe.

 


 

 


 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 10.57.50.png

Was bringt dem Kunden eine Marke?
Was fordert eine Marke dem Kunden ab?

Überlegungen von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English Version

 

Marken schwärmen: „Wir schaffen Erlebniswelten für unsere Kunden.“ 

Die Frage, die sich mir stellt, lautet: Treffen Marken noch das Momentum, was Kundenbedürfnisse, oder besser: die Kundenbefindlichkeit, tatsächlich ausmacht? Oder führt eine zunehmend forcierte Brand Experience-Attitüde nicht am Ziel vorbei — schafft mehr Frust als Lust?

Vorbemerkung: Von den Besten lernen! — Bevor sich die Eingangsfragen beantworten lassen, tut ein Blick zurück nach vorne gut (’Back to the Future’). Apple ist ein Paradebeispiel, von dem wir lernen können. Mitte der 1990er Jahre im Dauertief, fast nahe der Pleite, gelang der Turnaround. Heute ist Apple seit Jahren die wertvollste Marke der Welt. Wie konnte das gelingen? — „Communication first“ war ein zentrales Statement des legendären Steve Jobs beim ‚Apple confidential meeting‘ am 23. September 1997. 

Mit der kurz darauf gestarteten, unendlich erfolgreichen „Think Different“-Kampagne leitete er einen gewaltigen Umbruch in der Industriegeschichte ein, um mit dem iPhone 10 Jahre später die Schallmauer zu durchbrechen. Apple macht seitdem einen höheren Pro-Kopf-Gewinn als die meisten Unternehmen Pro-Kopf-Umsatz. 

Jobs betonte, dass Produkte, Marketing und Distribution wichtig seien, stellte aber die ‚Smart Communication‘ über alles und machte sie zur Chefsache. Mit seiner iPhone-Präsentation am 9. Januar 2007 erzielte er ad-hoc einen Zugewinn von rund 1 Milliarde US-Dollar (Media-Coverage, Aktienkurszuwachs) ohne das Produkt schon verkaufen zu können. Der Kniff: Jobs führte das neue Gerät bis ins Detail persönlich vor und hat sich damit mit seinen Kunden und ihren neuen Erlebnismöglichkeiten identifizierbar gemacht. 

Das Credo: Smart Communication rückt die Customer Experience ins Zentrum und machte den Vorreiter Apple bis dato zur Premium-Marke Nummer 1. Als iCEO war Jobs zugleich auch ein engagierter Chief Communication Officer, um seine Vorstellungen Teil der DNA von Apple, seiner Partner und v. a. seiner Kunden werden zu lassen. Ein Prinzip, dem andere Unternehmen wie z. B. Berkshire Hathaway durch Warren Buffett oder Virgin durch Richard Branson vermutlich ebenfalls ihren Erfolg verdanken. 

 

 

Apple hat sich aus meiner Sicht mit Abstand als fähigstes Smart Communication-Unternehmen profiliert. Mit maximaler Loyalität bei Kunden rund um den Globus. 

 


Persönliche Anmerkung: Die Erfahrung kann jeder machen, der ein Apple Produkt kauft — so wie ich gerade den neuen iMac 27’’ mit Retina 5K Display und MagicTrackpad: Von der (Online-)Beschaffung inkl. Leasing bis zur Lieferung frei Haus, der kinderleichten Inbetriebnahme (allein das Auspacken des iMac ist ein Designerlebnis!), bis zu der iCloud-Anmeldung unmittelbar folgenden Welcome-Email von Apple — die Profi-Support anbot, der sogleich aufs Beste erfolgte — wurde in kürzester Zeit der neue Computer Teil meiner persönlichen Erlebnis- und Arbeitswelt. Mit wunderbaren Überraschungen dank zahlreicher Technik-Innovationen und Qualitätsmerkmalen auf höchstem Niveau. In Summe: Benchmark!


Fragen wir uns also:
Was unterscheidet Customer Experience von Brand Experience?

Von den besten lernen: Schaut man genau hin, verfolgen neben Apple auch andere der wertvollsten Marken der Welt ein ähnliches Prinzip: Google, Facebook, Amazon, Uber und Airbnb — alles überaus erfolgreiche Unternehmen der neueren Zeit, die das Customer Experience-Prinzip verinnerlicht haben und praktizieren. Von Experten wird gerne angeführt, der Erfolg liege am überlegenen innovativen Plattform-Geschäftsmodell. 

Aus meiner Sicht stimmt das zwar, weil exponentielles Wachstum möglich wird: man ist in der Lage, Millionen und Milliarden von Kunden direkt anzusprechen; aber Geschäftsmodell-Innovationen wie auch neue Digital-Technologien sind ‚nur’ Mittel zum Zweck — und per se keine Erfolgsgaranten.

Wir müssen also das Andere denken — Think different!

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 10.27.11.png

 

Überlegung 1

Entscheidend ist, die Innovations- und Technologie-Mechanismen so auszunutzen, dass Dialoge respektive Konversationen mit Kunden in Echtzeit entstehen, um für die Perfektionierung von Services und Produkten nutzbar zu werden, die sich am individuellen Bedarf des Kunden ausrichten. Smart Communication stellt das sicher!

Überlegung 2

Die Marke selbst steht nicht mehr im Zentrum, sie wird quasi zum gemeinsamen Vehikel von Unternehmen und Kunden. Aus Mass Marketing wird Mass Customized Marketing. Legt man wie die Mehrzahl der etablierten Markenunternehmen den Fokus auf Brand Experience, um über die möglichst starke Strahlkraft der Marke per Mass Penetration Kunden zu beeindrucken und so zum Kaufen zu bewegen, kann man im besten Falle noch Kosten decken, aber kaum noch profitabel organisch wachsen oder zweistellige Margen erzielen.

Überlegung 3

Die Realität ist zwangsläufig: Kunden fühlen sich mehr und mehr enttäuscht, wenn Marken offensichtlich den persönlichen Kontakt zu Ihnen verloren haben. 

 



Adobe
hat in seiner aktuellen Studie „Reinventing Loyalty: The New Loyalty Experience“ (Herbst 2017) herausgefunden, dass 75 Prozent der CMO’s zugeben, dass bei Kunden-bindung/Kundenzufriedenheit Verbesserungsbedarf besteht bzw. dass sie gar nicht wissen, was ihre Kunden eigentlich beschäftigt. „This clearly demonstrates that CMOs feel that there is huge room for improvement when it comes to implementing the new loyalty dimensions.“


Die neuen ‚Loyalty Dimensions’ fußen meines Erachten auf ‚alten‘ gemeinsamen Wertvorstellungen, geprägt durch Vertrauen, Zufriedenheit, Verbundenheit (relatedness), die auch den Kern von Smart Communication ausmachen. 

In diesem Kontext zu beachten: Die üblichen ‚digitalen‘ Transformations-Bestrebungen führen am Ziel vorbei, da nicht Customer Experience, sondern die Optimierung unternehmensinterner Prozesse erfolgt, die dem Unternehmen Aufwand und Kosten sparen, den Aufwand beim Kunden aber drastisch erhöhen. Persönliche Rückfrage-Möglichkeiten von Mensch zu Mensch sind dann allzuoft kaum noch möglich.

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-04-13 um 10.27.48.png

 

Überlegung 4

Um Unzufriedenheit und Loyalitätsverlust bei Kunden zu vermeiden, bedarf es aus meiner Sicht nicht unbedingt einer veränderten Qualifikation, sondern der Änderung des Auftrags der Marketing-Verantwortlichen. 

Warum?

  • Brand Experience legt den Fokus auf „buying“ und benutzt überwiegend kostspielige Medien und Kreativ-Leistungen Dritter (wobei wie Nielsen in Deutschland als Premiummarkt in Europa für das Jahr 2017 vermeldet, die Brutto-Werbeausgaben zum Teil rückläufig sind, trotz hohem Wachstum bei Mobile-Advertising). Die entsprechenden Strategien und Maßnahmen zielen darauf ab, Kunden ständig, fast wie auf einer Treibjagd, mit Werbebotschaften zu befeuern, anywhere, anytime. Sog. Bonusprogramm dynamisieren die Hetze erheblich.
  • Aber: Customer Experience setzt dagegen auf „serving & satisfying“ v. a. durch Direktkontakte und Dialoge. Customer Experience folgt dem Prinzip des ‚Listen & Learn‘. Die Echtzeit-Erfassung der Kundenerlebnisse wird genutzt, um Produkte und Services stetig zu verbessern. Kommunikation und Transaktion werden dabei so eng wie möglich, am besten nahtlos, verzahnt. — Credo: It’s all about interaction and relatedness by smart communication.

Überlegung 5

Das Brand Experience Prinzip führt nicht mehr weiter. Mit einer individuell zugeschnittenen Smart Communication-Architektur, die Customer Experience-fokussiert ausgestaltet wird, lassen sich Kundenbefindlichkeiten und Erwartungen am besten decken. Im Fokus: Great Conversations!

Wenn man die für Apple so erfolgreiche Smart Communication-Strategie systemisch strukturiert, aufs eigene Unternehmen adaptiert sowie im Detail das Wesen der Smart Communication exakt versteht, wird man extrem rasch auf individuelle Kundenbefindlichkeiten eingehen können. Es bleibt nämlich gar keine andere Wahl! ‚Communication first‘ geht dann einher mit ‚Customer benefits first‘.

 


 

Handlungsanweisungen 

  1. Think different! Stelle Deine aktuelle Branding- und Customer Experience-Strategie auf den Prüfstand und diskutiere Deine Erkenntnisse mit anderen.
  2. Überdenke und hinterfrage kritisch den Wert der gegenwärtigen Kommunikationspraxis in Deinem Unternehmen (gerne mithilfe des ValueCheck Fragenkatalogs).
  3. Listen & Learn: Verstehe und nutze die Insights, die mein White Paper zu „Smart Communication“ bietet, inkl. konkreten Handlungsanleitungen und Organisation-Modellen.
  4. Gerne stehe ich mit meinem reichen Erfahrungswissen für weitere Erläuterungen und Unterstützung zur Verfügung.

 


 

Über den Autor: Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice. — Mit seinem Blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspiriert er Leser aus über 130 Ländern der Welt.

 


 

 


 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Photo: Heidelberg

 


“In today’s digital age with its cutting-edge business models based on networks and platforms, everything needs to be transparent, in real time, and focused on enhancing customer benefits.” – Professor h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview and analysis by Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German version

Successful printing doesn’t just happen. It’s all down to innovative plans and putting these into action. That’s the main focus of Chief Digital Officer Professor Ulrich Hermann, member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG since November 2016. In an exclusive interview, he explains the principles of the ‘subscription economy’, which is now firmly established at Heidelberg and is set to bring about success right from the get-go.

 


 

Note: In April 2018 some new reports in the news came up. Handelsblatt published via its global edition some great observations: Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG begins to look less like a factory and more like an information processing hub for industrial operations.“ — MORE

And more subscription customers got on stage, like Klampfer Group in Austria.  Or Lensing Druck Group in Germany.

 


 

The subscription economy is taking Heidelberg as a market leader and its primarily industrial customers to the next level of the transformation process. For the first time, printing performance is being assessed and billed on a customized basis, thus representing a brand new development and a challenge for the print sector. Conventional billing methods, i.e. selling equipment at a fixed price in offset printing or click charge models in digital printing, are being replaced by subscription models. This has its benefits.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info box: What is the meaning behind ‘subscription economy’?

The subscription economy correlates with the fundamental transition toward customized buying and selling in the B2C, and increasingly in the B2B, sector. The focus has shifted away from acquiring and owning products toward long-term, flexible customer relationships and ongoing customer benefits. The resulting technical and organizational demands are high. Some subscription-based solutions already exist in the printing industry, such as standalone software-as-a-service agreements. Important factors include automation, scalability, complex data models, and changed accounting principles right through to analytics. A constant supply of information on customer satisfaction and, most importantly, the way products and services are used is essential to enable businesses to further customize their services. What’s more, this data also helps both the supplier and customer achieve greater growth. Studies show that in the United States – the birth place of digitization – the subscription economy is already well-developed, generating approximately 800 billion US dollars in added value in the past ten years alone.  – aw


 

What is it all about?

The subscription economy could become the main focus in our sector, too. It has already achieved great economic success in the United States but remains largely disregarded in Germany. What difference will it make?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Subscription models offer a new approach for generating value by consistently focusing on customer benefits. Primarily, this means the end of product-oriented business models whose added value derives from creating a product, rather than from the benefit customers gain from that product.

Companies with analog models focused on manufacturing and selling products are eager to pass on expenses incurred in development, production, sales and supply to the customer as soon as possible. Whether customers are able to recover their costs is a question that is only considered relevant when it comes to the customer making repeat purchases, in other words it only becomes relevant at some point in the future.

What are the important features of a subscription?

It all boils down to a lasting customer relationship. This undoubtedly develops for services relating to the product, but not for the value of the product itself. 

A product-centric focus was the perfect approach for the analog world and shaped the industrial era for over 100 years because it was very difficult to quantify how the product was used and the associated added value for the customer.

In today’s digital economy, however, this approach is outdated as data is available on how products are being used and new business models are shifting the focus away from the value of the product itself and towards the usage value. We now aim to adopt this approach at Heidelberg as the leading supplier on the print shop market.

What are the advantages of focusing on the benefits to the customer and the disadvantages of focusing on the product?

As I’ve said, suppliers in the digital age can use platforms to gather, profile and analyze data on all participants with the aim of continuously and sustainably increasing customer benefits and thus instilling valuable, long-lasting customer loyalty. All processes must therefore focus on this and remain transparent for all participants in real time. If companies focus on the product, they can’t work out in any great detail or very quickly what it is their customers do with the product, when and how. Incidentally, that is a trend that affects many areas of professional and personal life…

… can you give a few examples?

It starts with reading a book or magazine, or when customers switch production equipment on or off, or why they are in the car and where they’re going. Manufacturers/suppliers usually know nothing about how their products are being used. As a result, they have to carry out costly questionnaires and analyses to anticipate how the products are being used and implement laborious improvements in long cycles.

During the analog era, innovations were therefore subject to protracted innovation cycles that were often staggered due to the risks involved. This led to analog companies spending a disproportionately large amount of time on optimizing internal value creation. It is clear that during this era the price of a product did not reflect how the customer used it but rather covered material and production costs.

 

A milestone on the road to the digital transformation and finally implementing the subscription program. A YouTube video of Dr. Ulrich Hermann discussing the market launch of the Heidelberg Assistant in December 2017.

 


 

The key to success

How can the focus be switched to customer benefits?

If we consider customer benefits to be the cornerstone of a company’s business operations, we end up with completely different approaches. Companies want to know what customers are paying for when using the products they have provided. This is exactly what disruptive business models in the digital world are based on. Usage patterns serve as the measure of all things – supported by the user experience and the customer journey.

Have companies in the print industry grasped this point? After all, nearly everyone nowadays is talking about customer orientation.

Technology suppliers often do not fully grasp that customer orientation, as a prerequisite to focusing on customer benefits, itself requires a comprehensive organizational transformation. Everything changes – from the mindset and culture right through to product creation. The ability to digitally measure the usage of products and services is key to creating added value. All business activities must pursue this aim.

Analyzing valid, long-term data collected from installed machinery and systems helps develop benchmarks with reference groups, which in turn enables the derivation of target figures and reference variables for optimum usage. We have been collecting such data at Heidelberg since the introduction of Remote Service technology back in 2004 and it has formed the basis for introducing Heidelberg Subscription.

With regard to the print industry, does this mean that it is not enough to simply introduce digital processes into print product manufacturing?

Exactly. In the digital economy, competition isn’t all about the product – the main focus is on developing the relevant user experience. I like to show a picture that presents the bustling streets of Manhattan as the heart of New York City. Some ten years ago, the streets were still filled with yellow cabs. Today, it’s dark sedans.

The product in this example is the same, just black and not yellow. It is a vehicle with a driver and passenger – and from the outside it is not immediately recognizable as a digital product. The difference, however, lies in the user experience. It is much easier to order, select, pay for and travel in a taxi with Uber and to influence the quality of the business model by writing a review.

Passengers feel like they are being taken seriously – as a business partner rather than a prisoner behind a plexiglass pane, if you like. It is no longer just about the service or product portfolio, but rather the customer journey and a new, intelligent way of using the product.

What does this mean in real terms for Heidelberg and its customers?

In our line of work, the subscription economy offers the opportunity to think about how we need to fundamentally change our business not just by selling machinery and services, i.e. billing for the product value, but by developing new models that assess the usage and the resulting positive effects.

 

This film on Heidelberg Subscription shows how Heidelberg is going down new paths in marketing, too.

 


 

How it works

What is the concept behind Heidelberg Subscription?

More than a year has passed since we began the transformation. We initially asked ourselves the following questions. What offers the biggest profit potential for our customers? Cost-effective printing capacity or optimum utilization? If our customers only derive added value from maximum machine utilization – in other words from optimized utilization of a coordinated combination of numerous individual products such as printing presses, consumables, software and services – why shouldn’t they actually pay us for this added value rather than for the individual components?

How did you go about answering these key questions?

A team of people with backgrounds in a wide range of disciplines such as finance, services, product development, sales and marketing / product marketing were tasked with developing a business model in which Heidelberg would not sell individual products to the customer, but rather offer the use of an end-to-end system that has been optimized for the specific needs of that customer. As early as December 2017, we concluded our first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. More contracts are in place, and interest in the market is continuing to grow significantly.

Aren’t print shops skeptical? Many are still coming to terms with click-charge models, which are now used as standard in digital printing.

There is a disadvantage to the click-charge models commonly found on the market. They reflect the market prices of digital printing press suppliers and are not based on the customer’s actual cost per printed page for offset printing. There are also no benchmarks for productivity targets etc. In our model, we bill per printed page using the ‘impression charge’.

What is an ‘impression charge’? 

The price per page reflects the potential of increased utilization during the contract period. However, the customer has to have a successful business model that allows for sustainable growth. Our subscription model is quite simply a genuine performance partnership. If Heidelberg fails to boost productivity during the contract period, neither the customer or we can fully satisfy margin targets. That is the difference to click-charge models.

The normal click charges for digital printing are based on the costs incurred by the digital press manufacturer and its profit expectations, not on the comparative costs for the customer. They represent a product-based pricing that the customer, the print shop, cannot control and that does not reflect their actual cost structure. Digital printing is therefore not a digital business model.

Added to this is the fact that if utilization fluctuates or is insufficient, click charges can quickly have disastrous effects.

So what is key for developing billing models based on customer needs?

Print shops want to be able to manage their costs themselves. And with good reason, as for many centuries printing was a skilled trade with humans controlling the quality of the work. Only recently has the business started to be industrialized following the automation of production processes with the help of standards. For a craftsman, what’s important is focusing on customer proximity and creating a bespoke end product with a special touch. Accordingly, print results sometimes varied dramatically in terms of quality and price.

 

An introductory explanation on Heidelberg Subscription.

 


 

What are the benefits?

What does industrial production do differently to craftsmen?

Industrial production based on standards creates results that are largely consistent. Only the level of automation creates differences in production, and defines the print outcome and the operating result.

To stand out, print shops must therefore make substantial investments in their own, increasingly digital customer relationships. Digital marketing, an online presence and digitizing the process of ordering best-selling products are becoming very important. Investing in the pressroom may be an age-old tradition but it opens up few opportunities to stand out. It also distracts from the actual job of a printing company in the digital age – namely to attract customers. With this in mind, switching to a subscription model is an easy and entirely logical decision.

What does results-based payment entail?

Our experienced performance-focused consultants conduct a comprehensive analysis of the print shop, reviewing costs for personnel, consumables, downtimes, plate changes, waste, depreciation, and much more. Once this thorough analysis has been completed, a unit page price can be determined that is specific to the relevant customer.

What’s more, we use the performance data we have gathered from more than ten thousand networked machines to establish reference variables. Thanks to this database we can make an offer to the customer to lower this price through a subscription contract because we know how to optimize their operations.

What criteria apply for the subscription?  

Heidelberg Subscription is based on the following considerations/criteria:

  1. Customers must demonstrate growth potential in terms of overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). For most customers, this averages between 30 % and 40 %.
  2. Concentrating on product innovations and customer acquisitions, customers must aim to significantly boost order volumes.

Suitable customers are offered an attractive price based on the above considerations and on a specific expected OEE increase, e.g. from 35 % to 45 %. Using this model, we sell productivity gains and help customers to achieve and exceed their goals. Heidelberg is responsible for setting up the turnkey system accordingly. We promise customers that the price premium for our optimized and more productive turnkey system will not only be worth it, but will out-do their expectations.

How do potential customers react to this new approach?

Many customers are enthusiastic as they are not dealing with a supplier that demands money up front for better quality and even charges for servicing if a machine breaks down. Instead, Heidelberg does everything it can to exceed agreed performance targets and ensure quality matches customer expectations.

Is Heidelberg taking a risk by standing as guarantor for success? 

Yes and no. Yes because with the subscription contract, it is in our own interest to ensure machinery is running, software updates are carried out, the use of consumables is optimized, and to do everything we can to increase output. No because ultimately, we take care in choosing our subscription customers. Most importantly, customers must all have one thing in common – they need to concentrate on growth and product innovation on the market, and their business model must demonstrate the potential for further growth.

Analyzing such factors has always been important for us as a manufacturer. We want to grow alongside our successful customers. In the traditional business, this took a back seat provided the customer could pay for the equipment. What we are talking about here is an excellent, new dimension to the partnership. We are no longer looking at whether our machinery, services or materials are cheaper or more expensive than rival products. Everything is defined by the mutually agreed performance targets, using the calculated price per page as a guideline.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Another important aspect of the subscription model is based on autonomous printing following the Push to Stop principle presented at drupa 2016. – See our ValueCheck and case report.


 

Invoicing method

How do you determine the costs with a subscription contract?

That is tailored to the customer and their potential. For customers wishing to expand their business, for example, we might recommend our Speedmaster XL 106. Customers then make an upfront payment, which is only a small portion of the overall cost that would have been due if they had purchased the machinery. They also pay a fixed monthly charge based specifically on the price per page calculation of the agreed page volume that the customer aims to print and that is lower than their average page production. Additional impression charges are only incurred if the page volume exceeds the agreed targets.

Is the subscription tailored to the customer?

A fundamental and unique element to our offer is that we can customize the subscription in its entirety. For example, for companies unable to greatly increase productivity because excellent industrial systems already ensure a high OEE, we adjust the upfront payment and the fixed monthly charge accordingly. Alternatively, for customers with significant potential to increase performance and dynamic opportunities to increase order volume, we focus more on the variability of the payments.

With our subscription program, customers no longer need to worry about investing in their pressroom, making full use of available technology, or keeping systems up to date.

Why should customers tie themselves exclusively to Heidelberg?

If customers opt for the conventional model, they are dependent on a much bigger group of partners. Buying machinery takes up a large part of investment and often means being dependent on a bank. The supposed freedom that comes with pulling together consumables and optimizing the various features themselves comes with greater outlay, and all the separate relationships with numerous suppliers are diametrically opposed to the print shops’ profit targets…

…so that means the classic method of gathering lots of offers before purchasing brings its own problems? 

Everyone tries to pass on their costs. If we focus on the actual purpose of printing on paper, I believe all these dependencies are a much bigger issue than signing up to a long-term subscription contract with one manufacturer in which the profit interests of the manufacturer and customer are aligned for the first time. A Heidelberg Subscription contract runs for five years. We anticipate continuous OEE growth within that period. For example, if we increase page volume from 35 million pages per year to 55 million pages, this corresponds to OEE growth from approximately 35 % to 60 %. There is no need to explain what this means for the customer’s profits.

Is Heidelberg therefore financing the manufacturing costs for the production equipment?

The equipment belongs to Heidelberg and forms part of our balance sheet and/or our financing partners’ balance sheets. On the one hand, this fits in with the expectations of those customers who are undergoing digital transformation, i.e. the move toward an automated printing operation and digital customer relationships. Subscription customers always enjoy the highest possible level of automation without having to worry about technology updates, or financing new investments.

On the other hand, such customers also want to use digitization to bolster relationships with their own customers. Digital expertise helps to significantly improve go-to-market capacity across a broad spectrum.

 

subscribe1


 

How go-to-market is changing

Does this mean the subscription model also helps improve customers’ go-to-market capacity because it frees up resources at the print shop?

Every new print shop development until now has required enormous effort to ensure the technology is sound but also to secure prices that reflect more complex and thus more effective products. Placing a unilateral focus on production and ignoring customer value in digital customer relationships will come back to haunt even extremely successful modern printing companies.

Devoting resources to further develop the customer journey offered by the print shop and not getting bogged down by technical and administrative aspects is the best way of standing out from competitors and keeping ahead of the curve.

In other words, you are shifting your customers’ business focus?

Our high-growth customers are all excellent entrepreneurs who always focus on where the money flows so as to protect their investments. Customer orientation is greatly enhanced if we no longer force them to buy and maintain capital-intensive production equipment. Focusing completely on the customer as a core concept of the digital economy is always the best way forward for a prosperous business. That applies both to us and our customers.

With the subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of the financing. Do you anticipate any new challenges as a result?

A listed company with experience in customer financing such as Heidelberg cannot help but adopt new approaches in terms of financing. We even have a banking license. What works best for our investors is always cash-stable contracts with selected customers that have good potential for growth and are highly innovative.

That’s exactly what our subscription program ensures with its guaranteed monthly payments – particularly given that we can pool contracts and also trade through a financing partner. This is a much more attractive option for investors than having to negotiate contracts with individual print shops. Risks are balanced thanks to a diversified base of carefully assessed and chosen subscribers.

Last but not least, how quickly can you and do you want to increase market share with the subscription model?

There is very strong demand. But we are taking our time and signing contracts with selected ‘early adopters’. In this financial year, we aim to conclude ten contracts to gain experience and lay a solid foundation to gradually establish the offer across the market.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

As early as December 2017, Heidelberg concluded its first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. Photo: Heidelberg


 

Final conclusions

How would you summarize this development?

We live in exciting times with completely new opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers. The digital economy offers entirely new mindsets for these opportunities. Ensuring the transparent use of products and services in a digital business relationship enables us to concentrate on the real source of added value…

…and what does that ultimately mean?

The transparency we provide establishes fair business relationships between those involved, but also places great responsibility on all participants in the interest of preserving their freedom. This responsibility puts the spotlight on the values of the business partners. Heidelberg values have remained constant throughout our long industrial history and play a particularly important role in our digital strategy. We have reworded the responsibility assumed by Heidelberg in its role as a printing industry partner: Listen. Inspire. Deliver. Digital business models hardly get any better than that.

Thank you for agreeing to this interview and giving a detailed insight into the hidden complexities of mastering digital transformation.

 


 

#ValueCheck – Heidelberg Subscription as a new economic system

Why the subscription model from Heidelberg is not only a logical choice, but also essential for ensuring growth with innovative ideas

STATUS QUO

  • The print production volume (PPV) is stable at approximately 410 billion euros worldwide each year.
  • Despite this, the number of print shops and print units is decreasing due to improved press performance.
  • Even as print runs shrink, OEE (overall equipment effectiveness) can be increased through the automation of industrial-scale operations.
  • Today, growth rates can be more than doubled from 30 percent to 70 percent over ten years.
  • Given that the PPV cannot be doubled, there is an inevitable and considerable decrease in the number of print units that can be sold (up to 50 percent).
  • Heidelberg therefore has to generate added value elsewhere if it is to avoid becoming dependent on crowding out competitors or snatching market shares in order to survive in a shrinking machinery market.

MEASURES

  • Heidelberg is gaining attention as an “all-in system” thanks to its extensive print know-how and its servicing database, which has been established on the basis of predictive monitoring since 2004 and focuses on the continuous analysis and improvement of installed production equipment. More than 10,000 Heidelberg presses are currently subject to continuous analysis.
  • With its subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of everything to ensure maximum use is made of installed print shop technology.

EFFECTS

  • The risk associated with innovations is not only dramatically reduced, but also more widely spread.
  • Capital-intensive investments in production equipment no longer put a financial strain on print shops. Heidelberg supports customers, pooling and implementing investments with financing partners on good terms.
  • This has immediate positive effects on our industrial-scale customers, as increased flexibility and variability of usage provides immense freedom to concentrate on optimizing the marketing of enhanced performance and accelerating print shop growth.
  • The continuous increase in utilization results in improved profitability in the short, medium and long term.
  • The subscription program opens up linear and exponential growth opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Photo: Heidelberg

 

 

About Dr. Ulrich Hermann

Dr. Ulrich Hermann has been a member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG in his role as Chief Digital Officer since November 2016. Thanks to his proven expertise in the digital transformation of businesses, Hermann was made an honorary professor at Allensbach University, Constance, Germany, in August 2017.

Born 1966 in Cologne, he earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at RWTH in Aachen and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge, United States.

In 1996, he completed a doctorate in business economics at the University of St. Gallen, in 1998 he became the Managing Director of Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG, and in 2002 he was appointed Managing Director of Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation.

In 2005, he assumed the role of Chairman of the Management Board at Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding, later becoming a Member of the Divisional Executive Board for the Central European Region at Wolters Kluwer n.v. in 2010.

 


 

About Andreas Weber, Founder and CEO of Value Communication AG: Since more than 25 years Andreas Weber serves on an international level as a business communication analyst, influencer and transformer. His activities are dedicated to the ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ via presentations, management briefings, coachings, workshops, analysis&reports, strategic advice.

 


 

ValueCheck AutLay 01

Das Kölner Start-up AutLay.com schickt sich an, die Welt der Datenaufbereitung für den Druck zu revolutionieren. Bildcollage: Andreas Weber

Von Andreas Weber

Das Kölner Start-Up „AutLay.com” profitiert von jahrelanger, erfolgreicher Forschungsarbeit an der Universität zu Köln. Wirtschaftsinformatiker beschäftigen sich dort seit über einem Jahrzehnt mit Personalisierung und Individualisierung im Druck.

Herausgekommen ist eine neue, funktionsfähige Software-Architektur, die die automatisierte Erstellung von Layouts für druckfertige Dokumente in Echtzeit ermöglicht. Der Name AutLay steht für „Automatisches Layout“.

Seit Sommer 2017 fördern die Europäische Union im Rahmen des EFRE.NRW sowie die NRW-Landesregierung das Spitzenprojekt im Rahmen des Förderwettbewerbs START-UP-Hochschul-Ausgründungen. Bis November 2018 sollen finale Marktest abgeschlossen sein.


Innovationsansatz

Die Wissenschaftler sehen die Innovationsmöglichkeiten im Digitalzeitalter nicht nur auf rein digitale Entwicklungen begrenzt, sondern haben das größte Potenzial identifiziert in der Kombination von Print (via Digitaldruck) und eines integrierten Verfahrens durch neuentwickelte Software-as-a-Service-Lösungen zur vollautomatisierten Layout-Erstellung inkl. Druckdatenaufbereitung in Echtzeit.

Der Clou: Die Kölner kommen ohne sog. Templates aus, bislang das Nadelöhr der Pre-Media-Prozesse bei Print-Produktionen aller Art. Denn Templates sind starre Vorlagen, die als „digitale Schablonen“ bei Web-to-Print- resp. Web-to-Publishing Anwendungen bis dato notwendig sind und definieren fixe sowie variable, veränderbare Bestandteile, wie Texte oder Bilder.

Statische Templates werden bei AutLay.com durch Algorithmen ersetzt, die auf frei bestimmbaren Regelwerken basieren und vordefinierte Druckergebnisse in Echtzeit sicherstellen. Es werden dabei Metriken zur Quantifizierung von Ästhetik identifiziert, konsolidiert und entwickelt. Durch sogenannte Recommender-Systeme (automatisierte Empfehlungstechnologien) lassen sich die relevanten Inhalte für jeden Empfänger individuell festlegen.


ValueCheck AutLay 02

Der venezianische Buchdrucker und Verleger Aldus Manutius (1449-1515) gilt als wegweisender Typograph, der u. a. den Satzspiegel ‚erfand“‘ und damit die Basis für moderne Layout-Techniken und die Verwendung von Templates legte. Sein Druckerzeichen zeigt einen Anker und einen Delphin: Der Anker steht als Symbol für die Langsamkeit, der Delphin für die Geschwindigkeit. [Im Bild: Das Geburtshaus von Aldus in Bassiano]. — Der dynamische Erfinder-Geist von Aldus wie auch von Johannes Gutenberg verfügt auch heute noch über Strahlkraft und Leitbild-Funktion bei Innovatoren, die sich aber im Digitalzeitalter nicht mehr mit beweglichen Lettern, sondern mit variablen Daten beschäftigen. Bildcollage: Andreas Weber.

 


Innovationspotenzial

Weltweit werden pro Jahr über 3.000 Milliarden Euro aufgewendet, um für über 800 Milliarden Euro Drucksachen aller Art herstellen zu können. [Quelle: ValueTrendRadar Analysis: Print in seiner wirtschaftlichen Bedeutung.]

Erste Analysen zeigen, dass bei einzelnen Anwendungen wie z. B. für individualisierte Verkaufskataloge oder kurzfristige Verkaufsaktionen für Lagerbestände die üblichen Produktionsprozesses im Zeitaufwand um ein vielfaches reduziert und im Kostenaufwand nahezu halbiert werden können.

Den enormen Einsparungen durch den Einsatz von AutLay.com an Zeit und Geld stehen signifikante Vorteile beim Time-to-Market gegenüber, da schneller, unkomplizierter und Kundenbedürfnis-orientierter Waren und Leistungen aller Art angeboten und verkauft werden können.

 


 

 

Unter https://www.autlay.com/demo/ruck.html kann eine Demo Online angesehen werden.


 

Innovationsvorteile

Ein Umdenken wird möglich und praktikabel, um Kommunikation und Transaktion soweit es geht nahtlos zu vereinen und einfach, schnell sowie äußerst wirkungsvoll in der Praxis umzusetzen. Mit dem Effekt: Mass Marketing wandelt sich zu Customized Mass Marketing, denn grundsätzlich ist AutLay.com in seinem Leistungsvermögen beliebig skalierbar.

Ein wichtiger Zusatz-Effekt ist, dass Unternehmen erfolgreich den Kunden und seine spezifischen Bedürfnisse in den Mittelpunkt einer werthaltigen Kommunikation über alle Ebenen und Kanäle hinweg stellen können – dazu zählt insbesondere die Print-Kommunikation. Denn erstmals wird das in zahlreichen Systemen vorliegende Wissen über den Empfänger auch für die Print-Kommunikation nutzbar.


EFRE


 

Fazit

Mit diesem neuartigen Ansatz und dem engen Kontakt mit begleitender, unabhängiger wissenschaftlicher Forschung setzt sich AutLay.com deutlich von bestehenden Modellen der Software-Entwicklung zur Automatisierung von Medienkommunikation ab.

 


INFOKASTEN — Das Wichtigste im Überblick
(Ergebnisse aus aktuellen Expertengesprächen)

  1. Der generelle Nutzen von AutLay.com liegt nicht nur darin, Digitaldrucktechnik besser ausnutzen zu können, sondern darin, entscheidend zu helfen, Marketing-Prozesse und Print-Kommunikations-Abläufe durch Automatisieren qualitativ und quantitativ zu verbessern.

  2. Der ökonomische Nutzen liegt primär darin, dass Werbungtreibende mit ihren Dienstleistungspartnern entscheidend die unabänderlich steigenden Herstellungskosten im Druck wie auch im Versand (Logistik) kompensieren können. Und zwar indem durch AutLay.com die Premedia-Prozesse vereinfacht werden und sich dadurch Kosten- und Zeitaufwand drastisch reduzieren.

  3. Der funktionale Nutzen: AutLay.com nutzt alle relevanten Business Intelligence- und Big Data-Funktionalitäten, um Inhalte zweck- und zielgerichtet im Sinne des Targeting und der Mass Customization an die richtigen Zielpersonen per Print und damit nachhaltig wirkungsvoll auszuliefern.

  4. AutLay.com ist zukunftssicher aufgestellt und unterscheidet sich von anderen etablierten Lösungen durch sein variables SaaS-/Subscription-Modell: Es müssen keine hohen (Vor-)Investitionen in Soft- und Hardware getätigt werden, sondern es wird für die Nutzung bezahlt, die sofort Wirkung durch besseres Verkaufen zeigen kann. (Stichwort: Return-on-Invest quasi in Echtzeit!)

  5. AutLay.com verschafft Werbungtreibenden wie auch Agenturen mehr Freiraum für Kreativität, da man sich nicht mehr mit Technik/Layout/Design, sondern mit Kampagnen für Verkaufsaktionen beschäftigen kann.

  6. Last but not least: Die Wirkungsweise bewährter klassischer Direktmarketingmaßnahmen wird auf ein neues Level gehoben und durch Individualisierungsmöglichkeiten in Echtzeit erheblich aufgewertet.

 

#ops2018 David Schölgens AutLay

Eines der Highlights auf dem 6. Online Print Symposium 2018 in München: Die Präsentation zur Forschung rund um AutLay.com von Dr. David Schölgens.— Foto: #ops2018


Ausblick

Den bereits vorhandenen prototypischen Lösungen werden rasch weitere Beispiele im realen Praxistest für verschiedene Bereiche wie Handel oder Direktverkauf folgen. Denkbar sind zudem Kooperationen mit Print-Technologie-Herstellern.

AutLay.com ist als digitale Plattform durch sein SaaS-/Subscription-Preismodell sofort und unkompliziert nutzbar. 

Ein hoher Installations- oder Schulungsaufwand entsteht nicht. AutLay.com kann zudem je nach Anforderung individuell angepasst, modifiziert und erweitert werden.

 


 

 

2017-AutLayTeam

Das AutLay.com Projektteam: Dr. David Schölgens (links) und Sven Müller. 

 

Kurz-Übersicht zu Projekt & Team der Universität zu Köln

AutLay.com ist ein Ausgründungs-Projekt der Universität zu Köln. Im Mittelpunkt steht das vollautomatische und Template-freie Layouten druckfertiger Erzeugnisse. Mit diesem Ansatz ermöglichen die Kollegen Dr. David Schölgens und Sven Müller die individualisierte Kommunikation mit gedruckten Medienerzeugnissen. Gefördert wird das Projekt durch den Europäischen Fonds für regionale Entwicklung (EFRE) sowie Gelder des NRW-Haushaltes im Rahmen des Förderwettbewerbs START-UP-Hochschul-Ausgründungen. Professionell wird das Team unterstützt von ihrem Mentor Prof. Dr. Detlef Schoder und dem Coach Prof. Dr. Kai Thierhoff. Als Tutor steht der Analyst, Print- und Kommunikations-Experte Andreas Weber zur Verfügung.


 

Über den Autor: Über einen Zeitraum von mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Er hat zahlreiche Firmen mit begründet oder als Start-up betreut. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice. — Seit dem Jahr 2004 unterstützt er als Ratgeber und „Denk-Partner“ Prof. Dr. Detlef Schoder und sein Team bei der Innovationsentwicklung zu AutLay.com.

 


 

 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Foto: Heidelberg


„Im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen neuen, netzwerk- und plattform-basierten Ökonomiemodellen muss alles in Echtzeit passieren, transparent werden und sich der kontinuierlichen Steigerung des Kundennutzen unterordnen.“ — Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview und Analyse von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English Version

Erfolg im Print kommt nicht von alleine. Sondern nur durch neues Denken und Handeln! So kann man auf einen Nenner bringen, worum es Chief Digital Officer Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann, seit November 2016 Mitglied im Vorstand der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, bei seiner Arbeit geht. Im Exklusiv-Gespräch erklärt er die Prinzipien der ‚Subscription Economy‘, die bei Heidelberg nunmehr fest etabliert wird und aus dem Stand heraus Erfolge zeigen soll.

 


 

Hinweis: Im April 2018 erschienen weitere Neuigkeiten und Kommentare zu Heidelbergs Subscription Modell, zum Beispiel im Handelsblatt. “Der Verkauf von Druckmaschinen ist nicht mehr das Hauptgeschäft.”

Auch neue Kunden wurden vorgestellt, wie die Klampfer Group in Österreich oder die Lensing Druck Group in Deutschland.


 

Dies führt Heidelberg als Branchenprimus und seine vorwiegend industriell ausgerichteten Kunden auf das nächste Level der Transformation. Für die Print-Branche ist das ein Novum und eine Herausforderung zugleich, da die Leistungen von Druckereien erstmals individuell bewertet und abgerechnet werden. Die üblichen Abrechnungswege durch Verkauf von Equipment zu Festpreisen im Offsetdruck oder Click-Charge-Modelle im Digitaldruck werden durch Subscription überholt. Das bietet Vorteile.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info-Box: Was bedeutet ‚Subscription‘?

Die Subscription Economy korreliert mit dem fundamentalen Wandel eines auf Individualisierung ausgerichtetem Kauf- und Verbraucherverhalten im B2C wie immer stärker auch im B2B. Langfristige und flexible Kundenbeziehungen und der kontinuierliche Kundennutzen stehen im Fokus, nicht mehr der Erwerb und Besitz von Produkten. Die resultierenden technischen und organisatorischen Anforderungen sind hoch. In der Druckbranche sind solche Lösungen partiell schon bekannt durch singuläre Software-as-a-Service-Lösungen. Wichtige Parameter sind Automatisierung und Skalierbarkeit, komplexe Datenmodelle, veränderte Rechnungslegung bis hin zu Analytics. Von entscheidender Bedeutung ist es, kontinuierlich Aufschluss über die Kundenzufriedenheit und v.a. die Art und Weise der Nutzung von Produkten oder Services zu erhalten, da sie es Unternehmen erlauben, die Dienste individueller zu gestalten, um Wachstum für Lieferant und Kunde gleichermaßen zu ermöglichen. Studien belegen, dass in den USA als dem Mutterland der Digitalisierung die Subscription Economy schon weit entwickelt ist und in den letzten 10 Jahren bereits rund 800 Milliarden US-Dollar an Wertschöpfung erzielte. —aw


 

Worum es geht

Die Subskriptions-Ökonomie könnte auch in unserer Branche das große Thema werden — in den USA bereits wirtschaftlich extrem erfolgreich, bei uns bis dato noch kaum beachtet. Was ändert sich dadurch?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Der Begriff ‚Subscription‘ steht für ein neues Modell der Wertschöpfung durch konsequente Nutzen-Zentrierung. Es bedeutet primär das Ende der produktzentrischen Orientierung von Firmen, die ihre Wertschöpfung nicht am Nutzen des Kunden ausmacht, sondern aus dem Produktentstehungsprozess ableitet.

In dieser am Produkt und seiner Vermarktung ausgerichteten analogen Welt ist das Unternehmen bestrebt, so bald wie möglich den Aufwand, den sie für Entwicklung, Produktion, Vertrieb und Bereitstellung hatte, an die Kunden weiter zu berechnen. Ob die Kunden auf ihre Kosten kommen ist hier nur eine Frage, die für den Wiederhol-Kauf relevant ist. Also vertagt wird.

Worauf kommt es also bei ‚Subscription‘ speziell drauf an?

Es kommt auf eine dauerhafte Kundenbeziehung an; diese entsteht sicher für Service-Dienstleitungen „um das Produkt herum“, nicht aber für den eigentlichen Produktwert. Produktzentrierung passte bestens in die analoge Welt und prägte über 100 Jahre das Industriezeitalter, weil die Nutzung und die damit einhergehende Wertschöpfung beim Kunden eben nur schwer messbar waren.

In einer Digitalökonomie ist das nicht mehr zeitgemäß, da hier über die Nutzungsdaten verfügt und durch neue Geschäftsmodelle der Nutzwert, nicht der Produktwert in den Vordergrund gestellt wird. Dies wollen und können wir bei Heidelberg als erster Anbieter für Druckereien gezielt im Markt etablieren.

Worin liegen die Vorteile von Nutzen-Zentrierung bzw. die Nachteile der Produktzentrierung?

Wie gesagt, im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen Plattformen können Anbieter Daten aller Akteure sammeln, profilieren und analysieren mit dem Ziel, den Kundennutzen nachhaltig und dauerhaft zu erhöhen und damit werthaltige Loyalitäten beim Kunden zu schaffen. Folglich muss alles Handeln sich daran orientieren und für alle Beteiligten in Echtzeit transparent sein. Durch die Produktzentrierung geht verloren, umfassend und zeitnah zu wissen, was Kunden mit dem Produkt wann genau wie machen. Ein Momentum, das übrigens querbeet viele Arbeits- und Lebensbereiche betrifft…

… können Sie Beispiele nennen?

Es fängt beim Lesen eines Buches oder Magazins an, oder damit, wann Kunden Produktionsmittel an- und ausschalten, warum sie im Auto sitzen und wohin sie fahren. Der Hersteller/Lieferant weiß darüber in der Regel nichts über die Produktverwendung. Die Folge ist, dass mit hohem Aufwand durch Befragungen und Analysen eine Antizipation der Nutzung erfolgen muss, um in langen Zyklen recht mühselig Verbesserungen vornehmen zu können.

Innovationen unterlagen in der analogen Zeit daher längeren und wegen der damit verbundenen Risiken in der Regel schrittweisen Innovationszyklen, was zur Folge hatte, dass der Anteil der Zeit, mit der sich analoge Firmen um die Optimierung der internen Wertschöpfung bemühen, unverhältnismäßig hoch war. Es ist nur offensichtlich, dass in dieser Welt auch der Preis nicht die Nutzung des Produktes durch den Kunden reflektiert, sondern eher der Deckung von Material und Produktionsaufwand.

 

Ein Meilenstein auf dem Weg, die digitale Transformation und letztlich das Subscription-Programm realisieren zu können: Die Markteinführung des Heidelberg Assistant im Dezember 2017, die Dr. Ulrich Hermann persönlich per Youtube-Video erläuterte.

 


 

Worauf es ankommt

Wie geht die Umstellung auf Nutzen-Orientierung von statten?

Wenn man den Aspekt rund um das Nutzen-Stiften als Kerngedanken ins Zentrum der Betriebswirtschaft einer Firma stellt, kommt man zu völlig anderen Vorgehensweisen. Man will wissen, wofür zahlt mein Kunde, während er die zur Verfügung gestellten Produkte nutzt. Disruptive Geschäftsmodelle der digitalen Welt bauen exakt darauf auf: Das Nutzungsverhalten wird zum Maß aller Dinge — getragen durch die User Experience und die Customer Journey.

Wird das in der Print-Branche auch schon richtig verstanden? Schließlich reden fast alle mittlerweile über Kundenorientierung.

Unterschätzt wird von Technik-Anbieter-Seite aus oftmals, dass allein die Kundenzentrierung als Vorbedingung der Nutzen-Orientierung eine umfassende Transformation der Organisation erfordert. Von der Denkweise und Kultur bis zur Produktentstehung, alles verändert sich. Die digitale Messbarkeit der Nutzung von Produkten und Services rückt in den Mittelpunkt der Wertschöpfung. Sämtliche Geschäftsaktivitäten müssen darauf abgestimmt sein.

Valide, langfristig erhobene Datenanalysen bei installierten Maschinen und Systemen helfen dabei Benchmarks mit Vergleichsgruppen aufzubauen, damit Ziel- und Führungsgrößen für die optimale Nutzung abzuleiten. Solche Daten erheben wir bei Heidelberg seit der Einführung der Remote Service-Technologie bereits seit dem Jahr 2004 und sind für uns die Basis für die Einführung von Subscription.

Bezogen auf die Print-Industrie heißt das: Es genügt also nicht, digitale Prozesse und Verfahren nur in die Fertigung von Print-Produkten einfließen zu lassen?

Genau. In der digitalen Ökonomie dreht sich der Wettbewerb nicht ums Produkt, sondern vor allem um die Ausgestaltung des relevanten Nutzererlebnisses — im neudeutschen eben „User-Experience“ genannt. Ich zeige gerne ein Bild, dass das Straßengeschehen von Manhattan als Herzstück von New York City zeigt. Bis vor 10 Jahren war es noch geprägt von den Taxis, den Yellow Cabs; heute von dunklen Limousinen.

Das eigentliche Produkt ist vergleichbar, nur eben schwarz und nicht gelb: Ein Auto mit Fahrer und Fahrgast eben — und von außen betrachtet nicht auf Anhieb als digitales Produkt erkennbar. Der Unterschied liegt aber im Nutzen-Erlebnis: Es ist viel einfacher mit Uber ein Taxi zu bestellen, auszuwählen, zu bezahlen, zu fahren und mit Bewertungen die Qualität des Geschäftsmodelles selbst zu beeinflussen.

Als Fahrgast fühlt man sich ernstgenommen, irgendwie als Partner, nicht als Gefangener hinter einer Plexiglasscheibe. Es geht also nicht mehr um das reine Leistungs- oder Produktangebot, sondern um die Customer Journey und die neue, smarte Art der Produktnutzung.

Was heißt das konkret, bezogen auf Heidelberg und seine Kunden?

Die Subscription-Economy bietet in unserem Kontext die Chance, darüber nachzudenken, wie wir unser Geschäft grundlegend verändern müssen. Indem wir nicht mehr nur Maschinen und Services verkaufen, also den Produktwert abrechnen, sondern neue Modelle finden, die Nutzung und die daraus resultierenden positiven Effekte zu bewerten.

 

Auch im Marketing geht Heidelberg neue Wege. Wie der Image-Film zu Heidelberg Subscription zeigt.

 


 

Wie es funktioniert

Wie muss man sich Subscription bei Heidelberg im Detail vorstellen?

Vor über einem Jahr haben wir einen Veränderungs-Prozess angestoßen. Wir haben uns zuerst folgende Fragen gestellt. Worin liegt das größte Gewinnpotential für unseren Kunden? Aus dem Besitz von günstiger Druckkapazität oder aus seiner optimalen Auslastung? Wenn unsere Kunden erst Mehrwert aus der maximalen Maschinenauslastung, oder anders ausgedrückt: der optimierten Nutzung einer abgestimmten Kombination aus einer Vielzahl von Einzelprodukten, wie Maschine, Verbrauchsgüter, Service und Software ziehen, warum soll der Kunde uns nicht genau erst für diesen Mehrwert zahlen und nicht bereits schon für die Einzelkomponenten?

Und wie sie sind Sie vorgegangen, um auf diese zentralen Fragen Antworten zu finden?

Aus verschiedensten Disziplinen wie Finanzierung, Service, Produktentwicklung, Vertrieb, Marketing/Produktmarketing wurde ein Team gebildet, um ein Geschäftsmodell zu finden, in dem Heidelberg nicht die Einzelprodukte dem Kunden verkauft, sondern die Nutzung eines auf den individuellen Kunden optimierten Gesamtsystems anbietet. — Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnten wir mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Weitere Abschlüsse sind in trockenen Tüchern. Und das Interesse im Markt wächst erheblich weiter.

Sind Druckereien da nicht skeptisch? Viele Drucker hadern ja auch mit den im Digitaldruck zwangsläufig üblichen Click-Charge-Modellen.

Die im Markt üblichen Click-Charge-Modelle haben einen Nachteil: Sie reflektieren die Marktpreise der Anbieter von Digitaldruckmaschinen und orientieren sich eben nicht an den wirklichen Kosten pro gedruckte Seite des Kunden seiner laufenden Offset-Printproduktion. Es gibt auch keine Benchmarks für Produktivitätsziele, und so weiter. In unserem Modell rechnen wir ebenfalls pro gedruckte Seite mit der sogenannten „Impression Charge“ ab.

Was ist unter „Impression Charge“ zu verstehen? 

Dieser Preis pro Seite reflektiert das Potential einer verbesserten Auslastung innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit, setzt aber voraus, dass der Kunde ein erfolgreiches Geschäftsmodell hat, mit dem er nachhaltig wächst. Subscription in unserem Angebot ist eben eine echte Performance-Partnerschaft. Sollte Heidelberg innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit die Potentiale nicht heben, dann können sowohl der Kunde als auch wir nicht die volle Margenerwartung realisieren. Das ist der Unterschied zur Click Charge.

Die üblichen Digitaldruck-Click-Charges orientieren sich an den Kosten der Digitaldruckmaschinen-Hersteller und ihrer Gewinnerwartung, nicht an den Vergleichskosten des Kunden. Sie stellen ein produktorientiertes Pricing dar, das vom Kunden, der Druckerei, nicht kontrolliert werden kann und auch nicht seine tatsächliche Kostenstruktur reflektiert. Digitaldruck ist daher kein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Hinzu kommt: Ist die Auslastung schwankend oder nicht ausreichend vorhanden, werden Click-Charges schnell ruinös.

Was ist demnach entscheidend, um Kosten-Abrechnungs-Modelle kundengerecht zu gestalten?

Druckereien wollen ihre Kosten selbstbestimmt managen können. Aus gutem Grund. Der Druckbetrieb war Jahrhunderte lang stets handwerklich orientiert, mit vom Menschen kontrollierter Qualität; erst in jüngster Zeit wurde begonnen, das Geschäft durch die Automatisierung von Produktionsprozessen mithilfe von Standards zu industrialisieren. Beim Handwerker stehen das Ergebnis einer individuellen Leistung mit seiner besonderen Note sowie die Kundennähe im Fokus. Entsprechend waren Druckergebnisse bisweilen komplett unterschiedlich in Qualität und Preis.

 

Ein erstes Erklärung-Video zu Heidelberg Subscription (in englischer Sprache).

 


 

Was es bringt

Was wir durch die industrielle Produktion anders als bei ‚Handwerk‘?

Durch die industrielle Produktion auf Basis von Standards sind Ergebnisse weitgehend gleich. Nur der Grad der Automatisierung schafft noch Unterschiede durch die Produktion und definiert das drucktechnische sowie das betriebswirtschaftliche Ergebnis.

Um ihre Leistung differenzieren zu können, müssen Druckereien daher erheblich in die eigene, zunehmend digitale Kundenbeziehung investieren. Digitales Marketing, Internetpräsenz und die Digitalisierung der Bestellwege der Print-Besteller wird extrem wichtig. Das eigene Investment in den Drucksaal mag alter Tradition folgen, schafft aber kaum noch Möglichkeiten zu differenzieren und lenkt von der eigentlichen Aufgabe eines Druckunternehmers in der digitalen Zeit ab: nämlich Kunden zu gewinnen. Vor diesem Hintergrund fällt eine Umorientierung hin zu Subscription nicht nur leicht, sondern macht absolut Sinn.

Wie definiert sich eine Ergebnis-orientierte Bezahlung?

Durch eine von uns durchgeführte, umfassende Analyse des Druckbetriebes werden alle Kosten bewertet: für Personal, Verbrauchsmaterialien, Stillstandszeiten, Plattenwechsel, Makulatur, Abschreibungen und vieles mehr. Wir nutzen dazu unsere erfahrenen, auf die Performance orientierten Consultants. Am Ende lässt sich aus dieser Gesamtsicht ein für jeweiligen Betrieb tatsächlicher Herstellungs-Seitenpreis ermitteln.

Zudem nutzen wir unsere Performance Daten aus mehr als zehntausend angeschlossenen Maschinen, um Führungsgrößen zu entwickeln. Auf dieser Datenbasis können wir dann dem Kunden ein Angebot machen, diesen Preis im Rahmen eines Subskriptionsvertrages zu unterbieten, weil wir wissen, wie sich dieser Betrieb weiter optimieren lässt.

Welche Kriterien greifen für die Subscription?  

Subscription fußt bei uns auf Basis folgender Überlegung bzw. Maßgabe:

  1. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss ein Steigerungspotential seiner OEE [Overall Equipment Effectiveness] haben, die bei den allermeisten der Kunden im Schnitt zwischen 30 % und 40 % liegt.
  2. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss signifikantes Wachstum in seinen Auftragsvolumen anstreben, weil er sich auf Produkt-Innovationen und auf Kundenakquisition konzentriert.

Kunden, die in Betracht kommen, bieten wir einen attraktiveren Preis auf Basis von Überlegungen sowie der Vorwegnahme, die OEE um definierte Werte zu steigern, beispielsweise also von 35 % auf 45 %. Wir verkaufen dadurch Produktivitätsvorteile und helfen dem Kunden dabei, diese zu erreichen bzw. zu übertreffen. Es liegt in der Verantwortung von Heidelberg, das Gesamtsystem dementsprechend einzurichten.. Wir übernehmen damit die Garantie, dass sich unser Preis-Premium für das bessere und produktivere Gesamtsystem nicht nur rechnet, sondern vom Kunden geschlagen wird.

Wie reagieren interessierte Kunden auf diesen neuen Ansatz?

Viele Kunden sind begeistert. Denn sie haben es dann mit Heidelberg als einem Lieferanten zu tun, der nicht am Anfang sein Geld für höhere Qualität verlangt und, wenn die Maschine steht, sogar noch Servicekosten berechnet, sondern der alles dafür tut, dass die Performance die vereinbarte Zielmarke übersteigt und sich die Qualität für den Kunden rechnet!

Heidelberg geht also ins Risiko bzw. wird Erfolgsgarant? 

Ja und nein. Ja, denn im Subscriptionsvertrag mit dem Kunden ist es Heidelbergs eigenes Interesse, dass die Maschine läuft, dass Software-Updates durchgeführt werden, der Einsatz von Verbrauchsmaterialien optimiert wird, und alles zu tun, um Leistungssteigerungen zu realisieren. Nein, da wir unsere Subscriptionskunden schließlich als Partner sorgfältig auswählen. Die Kunden müssen vor allem eines gemeinsam haben: Ihr unternehmerischer Fokus gilt dem Wachstum und der Produktinnovation im Markt und ihr Geschäftsmodell zeigt, dass Sie weiter wachsen können.

Diese Analyse war ja schon immer wichtig für uns als Hersteller. So wollen wir ja mit den erfolgreichen Kunden mitwachsen. Das stand aber im traditionellen Geschäft nicht im Vordergrund, sofern der Kunde die Maschine bezahlen kann! Wir sprechen hier über eine exzellente, neue Dimension der Partnerschaft. Wir diskutieren dabei nicht mehr, ob unsere Maschinen, Services oder Materialien günstiger oder teurer sind als beim Wettbewerb. Alles regelt sich über die gemeinsam festgelegten Performance-Ziele mit den errechneten Seitenpreisen als Orientierung.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Ein weiteres wichtiges Element für Subscription basiert auf autonomem Drucken gemäß dem auf der drupa 2016 vorgestellten Push-to-Stop-Prinzip. — Siehe unseren ValueCheck und Praxisbericht.


 

Wie es sich rechnet

Wie legen Sie die Kosten mittels eines Subskriptions-Vertrags fest?

Das erfolgt individuell je nach Kunde und seinen Möglichkeiten. Beispielsweise kommt für den Kunden, der sein Geschäft erweitern möchte, eine Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 in Betracht. Der Kunde leistet dann eine Upfront-Zahlung, die nur einen kleineren Teil des Gesamtwertes ausmacht, den er bei Kauf hätte zahlen müssen, zzgl. eines monatlichen Fix-Betrages, der sich spezifisch nach der Seitenpreis-Berechnung des vereinbarten Seitenvolumens, das gedruckt werden soll und das unter der durchschnittlichen Seitenproduktion des Kunden liegt, ergibt. Erst wenn das Seitenvolumen die vereinbarte Zielmarke überschreitet, werden zusätzliche Impression-Charges berechnet.

Passt sich das Subscription-Angebot auf die Kunden an?

Wesentlich und einzigartig ist, dass wir das Ganze äußerst individuell gestalten können. Beispielsweise wird bei einem Betrieb, der wenig Produktivitätssteigerung erwarten kann, weil seine OEE aufgrund exzellenter industrieller Fertigkeit sowieso schon hoch ist, die Upfront-Zahlung entsprechend justiert, ebenso wie der monatliche Fix-Betrag, der zu zahlen ist. Oder: Bei Kunden mit hohen Performance-Steigerungspotenzialen und dynamischen Steigerungs-Möglichkeiten beim Auftragseingang legen wir mehr Fokus auf die Variabilität der Zahlungen.

Unser Subscription-Programm befreit den Kunden von der Investitionslast im Drucksaal und der Problematik, die ihm zur Verfügung stehende Technik voll zu nutzen und selbst auf Stand zu halten.

Warum sollen sich Kunden ausschließlich an Heidelberg binden?

Wenn sich ein Kunde für das konventionelle Modell entscheidet, steht er in weit aus komplexeren Abhängigkeiten. Mit dem Kauf der Maschine legt er sich für einen großen Teil des Investments fest und steht häufig in Abhängigkeit von der Bank. Der vermeintlichen Freiheit, Verbrauchsgüter selbst zusammenzustellen und die insgesamt angebotenen Features selbst zu optimieren, stehen immer höhere Aufwände gegenüber und die gesamten Einzelbeziehungen mit den Lieferanten stehen den Gewinnzielen des Druckbetriebes diametral entgegen…

… das heisst doch, dass der klassische Weg der Anschaffung im Konzert mit vielen Anbieten Probleme bringt, oder? 

Jeder versucht, die Kosten auf den anderen abzuwälzen. Ich halte hier die Abhängigkeiten mit Blick auf den eigentlichen Zweck, ein Papier zu bedrucken, in Summe für erheblich grösser als einen langfristigen Subscriptions-Vertrag mit einem Hersteller einzugehen, in dem erstmalig Gewinninteressen gleichgeschaltet sind. Ein Heidelberg Subscription-Vertrag wird auf eine Laufzeit von fünf Jahren ausgelegt. Innerhalb der Laufzeit gehen wir stets immer von Zuwächsen bei der OEE aus. Zum Beispiel: Steigern wir das Seitenvolumen von 35 Mio. Seiten pro Jahr auf 55 Mio., entspricht das einem OEE-Zuwachs von rund 35 % auf 60%. Was das für den Gewinn des Kunden bedeutet, erschließt sich von selbst.

Heidelberg übernimmt damit die Finanzierung der Herstellkosten für die Produktionsmittel?

Das Equipment gehört Heidelberg und ist in unserer Bilanz bzw. der unserer Finanzierungspartner enthalten. Das deckt sich mit den Vorstellungen derjenigen Kunden von uns, die zum einen ihrerseits die digitale Transformation, sprich die Wende zur automatisierten Druckfabrik und zur digitalen Kundenbeziehung, bewerkstelligen. Unser Subscription-Modell beinhaltet, stets den höchst erreichbaren Automatisierungsgrad beizubehalten, ohne sich um Technik-Updates, Neuinvestitionen und deren Finanzierung kümmern zu müssen.

Zum anderen wollen diese Kunden ihre Kundenbeziehungen ebenfalls durch die Digitalisierung stärken. Die Go-to-Market-Befähigung wird durch digitale Kompetenzen auf breiter Ebene extrem aufgewertet.

 

subscribe1


 

Wie sich das Go-to-Market verändert

Das heißt, ein wesentlicher ‚Neben’-Effekt der Subscription liegt darin, die Go-to-Market-Befähigung ihrer Kunden zu beflügeln, weil Ressourcen bei Druckereien frei werden?

Jede Neuerung, die Druckereien vornehmen, erfordert bis dato ungeheure Anstrengungen. Nicht nur, um dies technisch solide zu gestalten, sondern vor allem um Preise durchzusetzen, wenn Produkte aufwändiger und damit noch wirkungsvoller werden sollen. Die einseitige Konzentration des Druckbetriebes auf die Produktion und die Vernachlässigung des Kundenwertes in einer digitalen Kundenbeziehung rächt sich auch für die heute noch extrem erfolgreichen Betriebe.

Seine Ressourcen auf die  Weiterentwicklung der vom Druckbetrieb dargebotenen Customer Journey zu konzentrieren und sich nicht mehr im Technischen oder Administrativen zu verlieren, ist der beste Weg, immer auf der Höhe der Zeit sein zu können, um sich Wettbewerbsvorteile zu sichern.

Mit anderen Worten, Sie verschieben also den Geschäftsfokus Ihrer Kunden?

Unsere wachstumsstarken Kunden sind alles exzellente Unternehmer, deren Fokus immer dort ist, wo Geld fließt, um ihre Investitionen zu schützen. Wenn wir sie nicht mehr zwingen, sich vor allem mit dem Kauf und der Pflege von kapitalintensiven Produktionsmitteln beschäftigen zu müssen, profitiert die Kundenorientierung ganz erheblich. Der absolute Kundenfokus als Kernelement der digitalen Ökonomie ist immer das beste Prinzip für prosperierendes Geschäft. Das gilt für uns genauso wie für unsere Kunden.

Bei Subscription übernimmt Heidelberg die Finanzierung. Stellt Sie das vor neue, schwierige Herausforderungen?

Ein börsennotiertes und in Fragen der Kundenfinanzierung erfahrenes Unternehmen wie Heidelberg ist prädestiniert für neue Wege bei der Finanzierung. Wir haben sogar eine Banklizenz. Das Beste für unsere Investoren sind immer Cash-stabile Verträge mit ausgewählten, wachstumsfähigen und innovationsstarken Kunden.

Dies stellen wir beim Subscription-Programm mit seinen garantierten monatlichen Zahlungen sicher. Zumal wir die Verträge bündeln und außerhalb über einen Finanzpartner „traden“ können. Das ist für Geldgeber viel attraktiver als mit einzelnen Druckbetreiben Abschlüsse verhandeln zu müssen. Wir bieten durch die gründliche Selektion und Bewertung ein ausgeglichenes Risiko durch eine breitgestreute Subskriptionsbasis.

Zu guter letzt: Wie schnell wollen und können Sie mit Subscription im Markt wachsen?

Die Nachfrage ist sehr groß. Wir lassen uns aber Zeit, nehmen ausgewählte ‚Early Adopters‘ unter Vertrag. Dieses Geschäftsjahr wollen wir mit 10 Verträgen Erfahrungen sammeln und ein solides Fundament legen, um das Angebot allmählich breit im Markt zu verankern.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnte Heidelberg mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Foto: Heidelberg


 

Auf den Punkt gebracht

Wie lautet Ihr Fazit?

Wir leben in einer spannenden Zeit mit völlig neuen Chancen für uns und unsere Kunden. Die Digitalökonomie bietet hierfür völlig neue Denkmuster. Die Transparenz der Nutzung des Leistungsangebotes in der digitalen Geschäftsbeziehung führt zur Konzentration auf das wirklich Wertschöpfende…

… und das heisst letztlich?

Die Transparenz, die wir ermöglichen, führt zu einer fairen Geschäftsbeziehung der Akteure —  aber verlangt auch nach einer hohen Verantwortung aller Akteure, letztlich zum Schutz ihrer Freiheiten. Mit der Verantwortung rückt das Wertesystem der Geschäftspartner mehr in den Vordergrund. In unserer digitalen Strategie nimmt das Wertesystem von Heidelberg eine besonders starke Rolle ein und ist die eigentliche Konstante in unserer langen Industriegeschichte. Wir haben diese Verantwortung für Heidelberg als Partner der Druckindustrie neu formuliert mit: Zuhören, Inspirieren und Liefern. Es gibt fast keine bessere Wertebasis für ein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Danke für das Gespräch, das sehr aufschlussreich ist und zeigt, welche Komplexität dahinter steckt, den digitalen Wandel zu meistern.

 


#ValueCheck: Heidelberg Subscription als neues Ökonomie-System

Warum das Subskriptions-Modell von Heidelberg nicht nur Sinn macht sondern eine kluge Notwendigkeit darstellt, um Wachstum durch Innovation sicherzustellen

STATUS QUO

  • Das Print-Produktions-Volumen (PPV) bleibt stabil mit rund 410 Milliarden Euro weltweit pro Jahr.
  • Die Zahl der Druckereien nimmt aber ab, ebenso wie die Zahl der Druckwerke in den Betrieben („Print-Units“) aufgrund von besseren Maschinenleistungen.
  • Die OEE (Overall-Equipment-Effectiveness) kann selbst bei kleiner werdenden Druckauflagenhöhen durch Automatisierung bei industriell ausgerichteten Betrieben gesteigert werden.
  • Steigerungsraten können von heute 30% auf 70% in 10 Jahren mehr als verdoppelt werden
  • Da sich das PPV nicht verdoppeln wird, sinkt zwangsläufig die Zahl der verkaufbaren Druckwerke deutlich (bis zu 50%).
  • Die Wertschöpfung muss sich also bei Heidelberg verlagern, um nicht in einem kleiner werdenden Maschinenmarkt nur noch durch Verdrängung oder durch Marktanteile-Abjagen vom Wettbewerb überlebensfähig zu sein.

MASSNAHMEN

  • In den Fokus rückt Heidelberg als ‚Gesamtsystem‘ mit seiner umfassenden Print-Kompetenz und der seit 2004 durch Predictive Monitoring für den Service aufgebauten Datenbasis bezüglich der konstanten Analyse und Verbesserung der installierten Produktionsmittel. Derzeit über zehntausend Heidelberg-Druckmaschinen werden konstant analysiert.
  • Heidelberg kümmert sich beim Subskriptionsmodell vollständig um die optimale Nutzung der installierten Technik in der Druckerei.

EFFEKTE

  • Das Risiko für Innovationen wird nicht nur drastisch gesenkt, sondern verteilt.
  • Kapitalintensive Investitionen in Produktionsmittel belasten nicht mehr die Bilanzen der Druckereien, sondern die Kunden werden von Heidelberg unterstützt bzw. die Investitionen gebündelt zu guten Konditionen mit Finanzpartnern umgesetzt.
  • Dies hat unmittelbar positive Auswirkungen auf industriell ausgerichtete Heidelberg-Kunden, da das Mehr an Flexibilität und die Nutzungsvariabilität enormen Freiraum bieten, um sich optimal auf die Vermarktung der gesteigerten Leistung zu fokussieren und das Wachstum der Druckerei zu beschleunigen.
  • In der konstanten Nutzungssteigerung liegt kurz-, mittel und langfristig die Steigerung der Profitabilität.
  • Durch das Subscription-Programm bieten sich für Heidelberg und seine Kunden nicht nur lineare, sondern exponentielle Wachstumsmöglichkeiten.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Foto: Heidelberg

 

Zur Person

Seit November 2016 ist Prof. h. c.  Dr. Ulrich Hermann Mitglied des Vorstands der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG und gleichzeitig Chief Digital Officer. Im August 2017 wurde er als ausgewiesener Experte im Bereich der digitalen Transformation von Unternehmen von der Allensbach Hochschule Konstanz zum Honorarprofessor berufen.

1966 in Köln geboren, studierte er an der RWTH, Aachen und am Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge U.S.A. und schloss als Diplom-Ingenieur Maschinenbau ab.

1996 erfolgte die Promotion an der Hochschule St. Gallen im Bereich Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 1998  wurde er zum Geschäftsführer Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG und 2002  zum Geschäftsführer Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation ernannt.

2005 übernahm er den Vorsitz der Geschäftsführung Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding und wurde 2010 Bereichsvorstand der Wolters Kluwer N. V. Region Central Europe.

 


 

Über den Autor: Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice.

 


 

ValueCheck Lufthansa 2018.001.jpeg

Fotos: Lufthansa

Von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English version

 

Vorbemerkung: Als Teenager machte ich meine erste Flugerfahrung mit Lufthansa. Das war toll! Im Verlauf der folgenden 45 Jahren hatte ich mit der Kranich-Airline (auch einige Jahre mit Lufthansa-Senator-Status) so manche ‘Ups & Downs’. Neuigkeiten beobachte ich als Analyst stets hochinteressiert.

 

Mit einem Big-Bang, vielen Werbemillionen und voller Inbrunst inszeniert sich Lufthansa als Marke neu. Im Kern steht ein aufwendiges Re-Design — vor allen Dingen des Kranichs als Wappenzeichen — , das nach Schätzungen mindestens sieben Jahre zur vollständigen Umsetzung in Anspruch nehmen wird.

Die neue Markenwelt sei für ihn das I-Tüpfelchen der Modernisierung, meinte Konzernchef Carsten Spohr voller Stolz und Freude. Das wirkt. Experten werden nicht müde, sich über sämtliche Designaspekte im neuen Markenauftritt auszulassen. [Die Zeitung HORIZONT lieferte einen Überblick].

Der Nachrichten-Sender n-tv bemerkte aber zurecht mit Hilfe des Media-Experten Thomas Koch: Ob das Re-Design tatsächlich neue Kunden bringe und das Geschäft beflügele, sei fraglich. Der Kunde, so Koch, entscheide nach der Leistung [und Güte] des Angebotes. Ein renoviertes Logo als Markenzeichen sei da eher beiläufig. 

Lufthansa Marketing-Chef Alexander Schlaubitz betont, dass es um mehr [oder gar alles!] gehe. Wie sein Konzernchef sagte: Die Lufthansa bedarf der Modernisierung. Für das Konzern-Marketing heisst das, sich allem zu entledigen, was nicht optimal digitalisierbar ist, um der digitalen Transformation und der mobilen Kommunikation auf den Pixel genau gerecht zu werden. [Siehe Interview von Fabian Wurm].

 

Kranich vorher nachher 58181-detail

Das Lufthansa Logo seit 1990.

 

Das hatte eigentlich schon der Design-Urvater Otl Aicher im Blick, der Anfang der 1960er Jahre den Kranich als Markenzeichen im Rahmen einer umfassenden CI neu gestaltet hat. Doch seinen Anspruch nach Klarheit, Prägnanz und Einfachheit hatte man seiner Zeit doch etwas die Federn gerupft und Kompromisse an die Tradition verlangt. Erstaunlich, dass nunmehr, fast 60 Jahre später, man zu Resultaten kommt, die vielfach auf Aichers ursprüngliche Absichten zurückgreifen. [Hinweis: Das konnte ich aus erster Hand erfahren, da ich persönlich einige Jahre mit Aicher eng an seinem Schriftenprojekt Rotis zusammen gearbeitet habe, und er oft von Lufthansa und anderen Kunden sprach.]

Viel Lärm um nichts?

Wie so oft, ist das Kundenerleben im Umgang mit der Marke ein ganz anderes, als das, was vom Marketing vorausgesetzt wird. Zeitgleich verschickte die Lufthansa ein E-Mail (wohl an alle Kundenprogramm-Mitglieder, in modifizierter Form auch als Manifest per Anzeigenmotiv verwendet), das nachdenklich macht, da es das Selbstlob überfordert und dabei in vielen Stakkato-ähnlichen Satzfetzen den möglichen Kundennutzen ziemlich ausser Acht lässt:

  • Der Einleitungssatz beginnt mit „Wir“ (i. S. v. „wir bei Lufthansa“ und nicht im Sinne von „wir als Gemeinschaft“).
  • Der Kunde wird gleich zu Beginn, spitz formuliert, als „Flug-Begleiter“ stilisiert.
  • Es wird vorausgesetzt, dass Kunden dem Anspruch von Lufthansa folgen müssen.
  • Der angepriesene Claim im modernen Hashtag-Gewandt #SayYesToTheWorld ist lächerlich banal und impliziert, dass Lufthansa-Kunden am besten abheben, in dem sie zu Ja-Sager werden.
  • Last but not least; Das Key-Visual im E-Mail zeigt die Heckflosse eines Flugzeugs — gerade so, als hätte der geneigte Reisende seinen Flug verpasst…
  • Und last but not least: Eine Möglichkeit oder gar aktive Aufforderung, sich zum modernisierten „Outfit“ der Lufthansa unmittelbar und per Reply zu äußern, erhält der E-Mail-Empfänger nicht. Schade. Oder? Denn das konterkariert die Werte, wofür das Digitale im Social Media-Zeitalter steht.
  • Anmerkung: Es ist davon auszugehen, dass viele Hunderttausende Kunden das E-Mail erhalten haben, in jedem Fall vermutlich deutlich mehr, als zum Zeitpunkt des E-Mail-Versandes vom Re-Branding über die Medien Kunde erhalten hatten.

Der „krass zeitgemäße“ digitale E-Mail-Schuss ging damit aus meiner Sicht nach hinten los, weil es dem Kunden nichts bringt, sondern Eindruck schinden will. Das ruft bei mir ungute Erfahrungen ins Gedächtnis, die ich als langjähriger Lufthansa Senator immer wieder durchmachen musste.


Besser spät als nie: Das Kommunikationsruder rumreißen!

Sollte es tatsächlich darum gehen, die Marke Lufthansa, dem Selbstverständnis nach dem „Premium“ verpflichtet, ins Digitalzeitalter zu transformieren, müssen radikale Änderungen im Denken und im Kommunikationsverhalten der Lufthansa erfolgen.

Diese Aspekte sollten aus meiner Sicht bedacht werden:

  1. Entscheidend ist, die Innovations- und Technologie-Mechanismen so auszunutzen, dass Dialoge respektive Konversationen mit Kunden in Echtzeit entstehen, um für die Perfektionierung von Services und Produkten nutzbar zu werden, die sich am individuellen Bedarf des Kunden ausrichten.
  2. Die Marke selbst steht nicht mehr im Zentrum, sie wird quasi zum gemeinsamen Vehikel von Unternehmen und Kunden. Aus Mass Marketing wird Customized Mass Marketing. Legt man wie die Mehrzahl der etablierten Markenunternehmen den Fokus auf Brand Experience, um über die möglichst starke Strahlkraft der Marke per Mass Penetration Kunden zu beeindrucken und so zum Kaufen zu bewegen, kann man im besten Falle Kosten decken, aber kaum noch profitabel organisch wachsen oder zweistellige Margen erzielen.
  3. Die Realität ist zwangsläufig: Kunden fühlen sich mehr und mehr enttäuscht, wenn Marken offensichtlich den persönlichen Kontakt zu Ihnen verloren haben.


My Take

Manchmal erscheint mir der Kranich wie eine Schwalbe, die noch keinen Sommer bringt. Um bestmöglich kundenorientiert zu sein, und damit Unzufriedenheit und Loyalitätsverlust bei Kunden zu vermeiden, bedarf es aus meiner Sicht nicht unbedingt eines veränderten Markenauftritts, sondern zunächst der Änderung des Auftrags und einer Wandlung des Denkens der Verantwortlichen. Mit dem Bekenntnis zur Globalisierung, zur Weltoffenheit und Neugierde” ist ja bei Lufthansa ein Anfang gemacht. — But at least: Customer First! — Das ist umso wichtiger, da die Lufthansa laut eigenem Bekunden dabei ist, die größte Werbeinvestition in der Geschichte des Unternehmens” zu starten — nachdem 2017 das beste Geschäftsjahr in der Unternehmensgeschichte war, und man 130 Millionen Kunden verzeichnete. Ich bin gespannt.

 


Über den Autor

Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice.

In seinem aktuellen ‚Think Paper’ hat Andreas Weber provokative Gedanken zu ‚Brand Experience vs. Customer Experience’ dargelegt. Mit den zentralen Fragen: „Was bringt dem Kunden eine Marke? Was bringt eine Marke dem Kunden?“.

Bei Interesse bitte Email senden, um das o. g. Think-Paper zu erhalten:
zeitenwende007{at}gmail.com

 


 

Mike Hilton's Global News Review 08072016.001

World Premiere: Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Member of the Board and Chief Digital Officer at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, started at 12. December 2017 together with Tom Oelsner, SVP Sales Excellence, the go-to-market campaign for Heidelberg.

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value

— Access to German Version —

Think global, act local — this motto could now also apply to print shops, both small and large: regardless of where the owner/manager is, the Heidelberg Assistant as a new, browser-based platform now makes it possible to monitor and manage all important workflows and process steps in-house and not just in the pressroom at all times via a smartphone, tablet, or PC. It also provides many new possibilities, such as the ability to see how your company stacks up against others. And everything needed to keep the production resources up and running is done automatically, from technical servicing and maintenance to ordering materials. This new form of integrated operations management is now a reality, and speeding up the journey of digital transformation. At the same time, Heidelberg is transforming its mechanical engineering business to become a modern, innovative platform operator for the printing industry.

The facts: Heidelberg Assistant launches in four countries

The Heidelberg Assistant is ready for the market. According to Heidelberg, it lays the foundation for taking the business of printed products of all kinds to a new level. The goal is to be able to seamlessly digitize Heidelberg’s collaboration as a supplier with thousands of its print shop customers at all levels. The pilot markets are Germany, Switzerland, the USA, and Canada. Over 30 customers from six countries were involved in the development, backed up by 400 customer surveys — primarily in China. The highlight: the integrated platform approach is making completely new operator models and eCommerce offerings possible, including in traditional printing, allowing print shops to concentrate fully on their core business. At the same time, Heidelberg can assume higher turnover from servicing and consumables in the long term. . The basic version of the Heidelberg Assistant is free of charge for customers, and securely controlled via an individual Heidelberg ID.

“With the Heidelberg Assistant, we’re digitizing collaboration with the customer. The lessons learned from this form the basis for the development of our new digital business models and speed up the digital transformation of the company,” says Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Member of the Management Board responsible for Heidelberg Services and Chief Digital Officer.

 

Video: Heidelberg.

 


 

According to information from the company, the details are as follows:

  1. Digital collaboration with the customer over the entire lifecycle — The Heidelberg Assistant will enable customers to run their processes smoothly and to operate their print shops smartly and efficiently.
    Benefits: Users get a complete overview of the service and maintenance status of their print shop, including data-based failure prediction. By getting access to the biggest knowledge base in the industry, users should also benefit from new performance services that enable them to maximize the potential of their entire value chain. The access to big data performance analytics should offer further potential for boosting productivity.
    Additional benefits: The Assistant will enable Heidelberg to further scale its existing big data applications such as predictive monitoring and performance consulting in the market.
  2. Digitization of the service chain Personal access to real-time access to knowledge base and service.
    Benefits: Customers get secure and personal access to the Heidelberg Assistant, which allows them to call up all information such as the status or productivity of their presses or services availed of in their company, anytime, anywhere.
    Additional benefits: Things like software updates, predictive maintenance messages or contract management and an invoice overview are possible in the system.
  3. Smart eCommerce offering all the way up to new business models The Heidelberg Assistant offers direct access to the new Heidelberg eShop (www.shop.heidelberg.com).
    Benefits: This link creates a smart eCommerce solution, since products can be individually recommended according to customers’ installations and needs. Additional benefits: Consumables and selected service parts are generally delivered within 24 hours.

 

171211_Heidelberg_Assistant

Photo: Heidelberg.

 

The added highlight: new kinds of operator models

Above all, Heidelberg also sees digitization as the basis for new digital business models. According to the company, two divisions are being introduced for this, both of which follow the win-win principle:

  1. Big Data: The extensive data analysis from the globally installed and networked base of machines and software enables Heidelberg to develop new digital business models. All in all, customers and Heidelberg benefit from the evaluation of a database of over 10,000 connected machine systems and over 15,000 software systems.
    Benefits: According to Heidelberg, an offering consisting of equipment, software, consumables, and service tailored to the exact needs of the customer and its entire value chain can be created based on this.
  2. Subscription: Operator models in which Heidelberg agrees a fixed price with its customers for the printed sheet will also be possible on this basis. Heidelberg provides all the necessary equipment for this.
    Benefits: The customer can concentrate fully on marketing its produces and services. Against the background of a growing number of customers that choose an operator model, increasing sales can be assumed both for customers and for Heidelberg.

 


 

“Spotlight on…—via ValueDialog:  Tom Oelsner, Head of Sales Excellence at Heidelberg, answers questions about the Heidelberg Assistant product launch.

Your project was truly mammoth, involving over 30 pilot customers. What were the biggest challenges?

Tom Oelsner: The biggest challenge was to establish an interactive and agile design process in dialog with selected international customers, and to advance our digital developments in a targeted way. Presenting the Heidelberg Assistant as a prototype at drupa 2016 allowed us to already gather a lot of customer feedback. On this basis, a dedicated team together with customers extended the platform to orient itself fully towards the daily needs of the participating customer employees (from the press operator to the operations manager, buyer, etc. as well as the management). These extensions were quickly designed and rendered tangible using agile development techniques, and then were available without delay for discussion and further tests.

Which criteria/aspects were and are the most important for your customers?

Tom Oelsner: The Heidelberg Assistant supports the customer over the product’s entire lifecycle. The customers are involved in industrial production, so machine availability and productivity are the most important goals. Topics relating to service and maintenance therefore become extremely important. With questions like ‘when will which technician come’, ’when, which materials’, etc. Basically, differentiations are required in the different production areas that our customers represent, which also depend on the type of company and the company/employee structure. For example, we needed to find out whether there are full-time buyers or people performing dual and multiple roles in the companies so that we can ensure that all the employees involved are adequately supported for their specific tasks by their platform account and find themselves. By doing so, we can address complex requirements and ensure tailored role/task-specific use of the Heidelberg Assistant, which can be differentiated by our own sub-accounts.

What is the most exciting thing about the project for you? And how do you see it developing?

Tom Oelsner: The most exciting thing is that for the first time, we have a platform with a variety of real-time interaction options. This allows us to meet the requirements of the platform economy and port them transparently to the print production business. Feedback from customers has been excellent and any possible acceptance thresholds are quickly overcome. Further development will take place in three directions.

1. Scope: Targeting other customers in the four pilot countries to include as many Heidelberg customers as possible or ideally all of them there, as well as extending the platform to other countries like Japan and China.

2. Product integration: To date, all Heidelberg products have been integrated, but not yet to the same depth. Little by little we want to extend the scope of service for all Heidelberg and OEM products and, for example, offer failure prediction beyond sheetfed presses.

3. Innovation: Currently we have over 200 new ideas from the teams, which we’re reviewing from the point of view of technical feasibility and profitability and integrating into new releases. The next release of the current Heidelberg Assistant 1 will come in March 2018, but extremely fast cycles mean that others will follow every three months. Incidentally, the reception internally at Heidelberg, i.e. among colleagues, has been fantastic. This all makes me extremely happy, and shows that we’re on the right path to making the digital transformation a reality.

Thank you very much for this informative interview!


 

tom-oelsner-foto.256x256

About the interviewee:

Tom Oelsner did a degree in computer science at TU Dresden. He joined Linotype-Hell AG in 1990, working in various software development areas and roles. From 2002, he developed Remote Services/Heidelberg Cloud as a program manager for Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG. He was appointed Vice President Enterprise & Services in 2008 and has been promoting digitization projects for Heidelberg and its customers as SVP Sales Excellence since 2010.

 

6F43C4EF-C3D2-4D75-B6F2-7C7B1768E4A9.jpeg

When iron stirs emotions: Koenig & Bauer commended for product campaign by Marketing Club Dresden/ Germany. Photo: kba.com

Graphic Repro On-line News to Friday 15 December 2017

Welcome to a roundup of 15 News items, plus Laurel Brunner’s Verdigris environmental Blog, which this week looks at Kodak, as it hopes to become the leading company for sustainability in the graphics industry.

As the year draws to a close the news has also slowed down, so I shall leave you to browse through this week’s headlines which contain an excellent selection of mixed news once again. Of particular note are the leaders on Tuesday with Baldwin Technology having now finalised the acquisition of QuadTech from QuadGraphics; and then on Thursday we have Leonhard Kurz, as it announces ground breaking test results from INGEDE confirming flawless deinkability for the recyclability of KURZ’ foil-decorated papers and boards. Then Sappi on Friday, as it announces plans to significantly increase the production of dissolving wood pulp at its Saiccor and Cloquet Mills in South Africa and North America by 2020.


Mike Hilton's Global News Review 08072016.001

World Premiere: Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Member of the Board and Chief Digital Officer at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, started at 12. December 2017 together with Tom Oelsner, SVP Sales Excellence, the go-to-market campaign for Heidelberg. Read our ValueCheck and ValueDialog report.


The tailender for this week goes to Koenig & Bauer (Monday) for the commendation it received for its current campaign ‘Built for Your Needs. The KBA B2 Presses’ product campaign, at an awards ceremony held at the Marketing Club in Dresden at the end of November.

If you are in the Southern Hemisphere and are due to close for the holidays during the coming week, do take care, stay safe and enjoy your time with your family and friends over the festive season and New Year. Please don’t drink and drive, or text and drive, or even use your cellphone when driving… we need you to stay alive. Have a wonderful Christmas and wish you a very Happy and Prosperous and Successful New Year 2018.

My best wishes and best regards

Mike Hilton


e-News comprises: Headline News – Online Feature Articles – the Verdigris initiative and our drupa Newsroom, all of which can be accessed from the Website Home Page and its Index. We also have News in Review, which provides an overview of the week’s news each weekend.

Headline News

Almost 30,000 news items have now gone online since we launched our Website in September 2001. News for the past 24 months can still be accessed via the Home Page and its continuation pages

Week beginning Mon 11 December – the published date appears in article footline

Monday
When iron stirs emotions at Koenig & Bauer
Koenig & Bauer commended for product campaign ‘Built for Your Needs. The KBA B2 Presses’ at event held in Dresden…

Sun Chemical price increase for Flexible Packaging
High raw materials costs the reason for the increase…

Flint announces price increase for Packaging Inks
Increased, incremental cost escalation forces Flint Group to raise the prices of its Packaging Inks products…

Tuesday
Baldwin Technology acquires QuadTech Inc.
Acquisition creates vision and inspection print technology powerhouse for the commercial, newspaper, labels, packaging, converting and publication gravure industries…

Mimaki to exhibit at PSI 2018 in January
Mimaki to bring a mini promotional product factory to PSI 2018 at Messe Düsseldorf 9 – 11 January

Resource Digital’s Fujifilm Acuity investment pays off
High Wycombe-based wide-format printer impressed with upturn in productivity following Acuity Select HS installation…

Wednesday
Digital transformation of Heidelberg gathers pace

Heidelberg breaking new ground in customer support: Heidelberg Assistant goes into series production…

 

New reader survey suggests print investment opportunities

Vaughan Patterson, product marketing manager for commercial and industrial print at Ricoh SA reports on the recent Two Sides global survey which included South African respondents…

 

Screen Truepress Jet L350UV for Tenovis in Slovenia

Tenovis answers short-run demand and opens up new market opportunities with Screen Truepress Jet L350UV…

Thursday
Kurz cold foil passes deinking test with distinction
Ground breaking test results from INGEDE for the recyclability of foil-decorated paper confirm flawless deinkability…

Streamline Press Leicester chooses ‘Push to Stop’
Streamline seeks ‘world class’ status with Heidelberg investment in ‘Push to Stop’ Speedmaster XL 106-5+L…

Screen and Meccanotecnica to collaborate for books
Companies to collaborate for optimised book finishing using EQUIOS Book Solution with Universe Sewing from Meccanotecnica…

Friday   
Sappi to significantly increase DWP capacity by 2020
Sappi confirms expansion plans for dissolving wood pulp (DWP) capacity at its Saiccor and Cloquet Mills…

FINAT Technical Seminar March 2018, Barcelona
The New World of Labels: FINAT event tackles the technical challenges from 7 – 9 March 2018 in Barcelona…

The first Heidelberg Speedmaster CS 92 in France
Rollin Imprimeur greatly improves cost-efficiency and flexibility with France’s first Speedmaster CS 92…

The lead article from a week last Friday…

Sappi Fashion White grades launched for shopping bags
Unique brand communication with excellent colour reproduction on new grades for shopping bags of the future…

GraphicRepro.Net e-News  (ISSN 1814-2923) is sponsored and made possible by:

Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG  (Heidelberg), The world’s largest printing press manufacturer for the industry worldwide. Visit the Heidelberg Website for more information.

drupa 2020 (drupa), the international flagship fair of the printing and media industry. Visit the drupa 2020 Website.You can also visit blog.drupa.comfor the latest industry news and developments.

Online Feature articles 2017
Only 49 articles last year – but you will find another eleven Expert Articles and ten drupa ante portas Blogs from Andreas Weber in our drupa Newsroom. There were over 70 in 2015, and over 90 in 2013 and in 2014 which can still be accessed via the Index on the Home Page.

VaueDialogue 2017

Previous…      #InfluenceB2B Transformation for the Digital Age
#InfluenceB2B programme leads from innovation to transformation! By Andreas Weber, Head of Value…

Online Features Nov/Dec Chapter 08

Previous…      Comexi and QuadTech collaborate for flexible packaging
Both companies invest in research, innovation and training to better serve flexible packaging printing with closed-loop colour control…

Future solutions for the ‘growth market of packaging printing’
More than 300 customers from around the world attended the Packaging Day hosted by Heidelberg at its Wiesloch-Walldorf plant in November…

Sappi expands speciality and packaging paper capacity
Sappi to acquire the speciality paper business of Cham Paper Group Holding in Switzerland and Italy…

Verdigris – Environmental Initiative

Laurel Brunner’s weekly Verdigris Blogs 2017

Kodak & Corporate Responsibility
The weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner – Mon 11 Dec

Previous…      Sustainability Initiatives
The weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner – Mon 04 Dec

Drupa Newsroom

Our Drupa Newsroom with news from Messe Düsseldorf in 2017 and for Drupa 2016 can be found in the Index. It is divided into Chapters for your convenience…just scroll down to view each Chapter

News from Messe Düsseldorf 2017

Previous…     Intelligent Printing in Focus
All in Print China to be staged at the new International Expo Center in Shanghai from 24 to 28 October 2018

The various Chapters in the drupa Newsroom are highlighted below. When you enter, just scroll down to see and access the complete collection::

drupa daily; drupa Exhibitors’ show + post-show News; drupa pre-show Exhibitor news; post-drupa from Messe Düsseldorf; drupa ante portas Blogs from Andreas Weber; drupa Expert Articles – and more

The Graphic Repro On-line is supported and sponsored by:
Drupa 2020,   Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, and  Kemtek Imaging Systems

If you would like to send news for consideration for the Graphic Repro On-line Website (ISSN 1814-2915) or to submit comments, please e-mail Mike Hilton at: graphicrepro.za@gmail.com.

Our Website urls are:
http://www.graphicrepro.co.za
http://www.graphicrepro.net

GraphicRepro.Net e-News (ISSN 1814-2923)  provides weekly updates from the Graphic Repro On-line Website and is  compiled and published by Mike Hilton,graphicrepro.net, PO Box 10 Peterburgskoe Shosse 13/1, 196605 Pushkin 5, St. Petersburg, Russia.  e-mail graphicrepro.za@gmail.com

Mike Hilton's Global News Review 08072016.001

Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Vorstand und Chief Digital Officer der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, gab am 12. Dezember 2017 im Team mit Tom Oelsner, SVP Sales Excellence, den Start für die Vermarktung von Heidelberg Assistant bekannt. Foto: Heidelberg.

Von Andreas Weber, Head of Value

—Link zur englischen Fassung—

Think global, act local — Diese Devise könnte nunmehr auch für Druckereien – kleine wie große – gelten: Egal wo der Inhaber/Manager sich aufhält: per Smartphone, Tablet oder PC wird es jederzeit über den Heidelberg Assistant als neuartige, Browser-basierte  Plattform möglich, alle wichtigen Abläufe und Prozessschritte im eigenen Unternehmen und nicht nur im Drucksaal zu überwachen und zu steuern. Hinzu kommen viele neue Möglichkeiten, etwa das eigene Unternehmen im Vergleich zu sehen mit anderen. Und alles was es braucht, um die Produktionsmittel am Laufen zu halten, erfolgt automatisch. Vom technischen Service/der Wartung, bis zur Materialbestellung. Diese neuartige Form des integrierten Betriebsmanagements ist nunmehr Realität und beschleunigt die Fahrt auf der „Digital Transformation Journey“ aufs Beste. Heidelberg selbst transformiert dabei sein Maschinenbaugeschäft in der Weise, ein zeitgemäß-innovativer Plattformbetreiber für die Druckbranche zu sein.

Die Faktenlage: Serienstart von Heidelberg Assistant in vier Ländern

Der Heidelberg Assistant geht marktreif an den Start. Damit ist laut Heidelberg die Basis geschaffen, um das Geschäft mit Printproduktionen aller Art auf eine neue Ebene zu heben. Das Ziel lautet, die Zusammenarbeit von Heidelberg als Lieferant mit tausenden seiner Druckerei-Kunden auf allen Ebenen nahtlos digital gestalten zu können. Pilotmärkte sind Deutschland, Schweiz, die USA und Kanada. Über 30 Kunden aus sechs Ländern waren in die Entwicklung involviert, flankiert von 400 Kundenbefragungen — vor allem auch in China. Der Clou: Der integrierte Plattform-Ansatz macht auch im klassischen Druck ganz neue Betreibermodelle und eCommerce Angebote möglich, damit sich Druckereien ganz auf ihr Kerngeschäft konzentrieren können. Gleichzeitig kann man in Bezug auf Heidelberg langfristig von höheren Umsätzen im Servicebereich und bei Verbrauchsmaterialien ausgehen. Die Basisversion des Heidelberg Assistant ist für Kunden kostenlos und wird sicher über eine individuelle Heidelberg-ID geregelt.

„Mit dem Heidelberg Assistant digitalisieren wir die Zusammenarbeit mit dem Kunden. Die daraus gewonnen Erkenntnisse sind Voraussetzung für den Aufbau unserer neuen digitalen Geschäftsmodelle und beschleunigen die digitale Transformation des Unternehmens“, legt Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Vorstand Heidelberg Services und Chief Digital Officer, dar.

 

Video: Heidelberg

 


 

Im Detail geht es laut Unternehmensangaben um folgendes:

  1. Digitale Zusammenarbeit mit dem Kunden über den gesamten Lifecycle — Heidelberg Assistant ermöglicht Kunden einen reibungslosen Ablauf ihrer Prozesse bzw. den smarten und effizienten Betrieb ihrer Druckerei.
    Vorteile: Anwender erhalten einen Gesamtüberblick über den Service- und Wartungsstatus ihrer Druckerei inklusive datengestützter Ausfallvorhersage. Zudem sollen Nutzer durch den Zugriff auf die größte Wissensdatenbank der Branche von neuen Performancedienstleistungen profitieren, mit denen sie das Potenzial ihrer gesamten Wertschöpfungskette möglichst vollständig ausnutzen können. Der Zugang zu Big-Data-Performance-Analysen soll weitere Potenziale zur Produktivitätssteigerung bieten.
    Zusatznutzen: Heidelberg kann mit dem Assistant seine bereits eingeführten Big-Data-Anwendungen wie Predictive Monitoring und Performance Consulting weiter im Markt skalieren.
  2. Digitalisierung der Servicekette — Persönlicher Zugang mit Echtzeitzugang zu Wissensdatenbank und Service.
    Vorteile: Kunden erhalten einen sicheren und persönlichen Zugang zum Heidelberg Assistant und können so alle Informationen, wie Status bzw. Produktivität ihrer Maschinen oder über in Anspruch genommenen Dienstleistungen rund um ihr Unternehmen überall und jederzeit abrufen.
    Zusatznutzen: Beispielsweise sind Softwareupdates, vorausschauende Wartungsmeldungen oder das Vertragsmanagement und ein Rechnungsüberblick im System möglich.
  3. Smartes eCommerce-Angebot bis hin zu neuen Geschäftsmodellen — Der Heidelberg Assistant bietet einen direkten Zugriff auf den neuen Heidelberg eShop (www.shop.heidelberg.com).
    Vorteile: Durch diese Verbindung entsteht eine smarte eCommerce-Lösung, da Produkte nach Kundeninstallation und bedarf individuell empfohlen werden können.
    Zusatznutzen: Verbrauchsmaterialien und ausgewählte Serviceteile werden in der Regel innerhalb von 24 Stunden geliefert.

 

171211_Heidelberg_Assistant

Foto: Heidelberg.

Das zusätzliche Highlight: Neue Formen für Betreibermodelle

Heidelberg sieht die Digitalisierung vor allem auch als Basis für neue digitale Geschäftsmodelle. Hierfür werden gemäß Unternehmensangaben zwei Bereiche angeführt, die jeweils dem Win-Win-Prinzip folgen:

  1. Big Data: Die umfangreiche Datenanalyse aus der weltweit installierten und vernetzten Basis an Maschinen und Software ermöglicht Heidelberg den Aufbau neuer digitaler Geschäftsmodelle. Insgesamt profitieren Kunden und Heidelberg von der Auswertung einer Datenbasis von über 10.000 angeschlossenen Maschinen- und über 15.000 Softwaresystemen.
    Vorteile: Daraus kann laut Heidelberg ein auf den exakten Bedarf des Kunden und seiner gesamten Wertschöpfungskette zugeschnittenes Angebot bestehend aus Equipment, Software Verbrauchsmaterialien und Service erstellt werden
    .
  2. Subscription: Betreibermodelle, bei denen Heidelberg mit Kunden einen fixen Preis für den bedruckten Bogen vereinbart, werden auf dieser Grundlage möglich. Heidelberg stellt dafür alle notwendigen Betriebsmittel zur Verfügung.
    Vorteile: Der Kunde kann sich voll auf die Vermarktung seines Angebots konzentrieren. Vor dem Hintergrund einer wachsenden Anzahl von Kunden, die sich für ein Betreibermodell entscheiden, ist von steigenden Umsätzen auszugehen, bei Kunden wie bei Heidelberg.

 


Nachgefragt per ValueDialog — Tom Oelsner, Leiter Sales Excellence bei Heidelberg, stand beim Produkt-Launch von Heidelberg Assistant Rede und Antwort.

Sie haben ein echtes Mammut-Projekt gestemmt. Im Team mit über 30 Pilotkunden. Was waren dabei die größten Herausforderungen?

Tom Oelsner: Die größte Herausforderung bestand darin, einen interaktiven agilen Designprozess im Dialog mit ausgewählten internationalen Kunden zu schaffen und zielführend unsere digitalen Entwicklungen nach vorne zu bringen. Durch die Vorstellung des Heidelberg Assistant als Prototyp auf der drupa 2016 konnten wir bereits viel Kundenfeedback sammeln. Ein eigens zusammengestelltes Team erweiterte auf dieser Basis gemeinsam mit Kunden die Plattform, um sich hundertprozentig am Tagesbedarf der beteiligten Kundenmitarbeiter (vom Print-Operator über den Betriebsleiter, Einkäufer etc. sowie die  Geschäftsführung) zu orientieren. Dabei wurden über agile Entwicklung diese Erweiterungen schnell ausgestaltet und greifbar gemacht, die dann sehr rasch zur Diskussion und für weitere Tests bereit standen.

Welche Kriterien/Aspekte waren und sind für Ihre Kunden am Wichtigsten?

Tom Oelsner: Der Heidelberg Assistant begleitet den Kunden über den gesamten Lebenszyklus des Produkts. Es geht um industrielle Produktion, daher sind Maschinenverfügbarkeit und Produktivität die wichtigsten Ziele. Somit nehmen die Themen rund um Service und Wartung eine herausragende Stellung ein. Mit Fragen wie: Wann kommt welcher Techniker, wann welche Materialien etc. Grundsätzlich sind in den verschiedenen Produktionsbereichen, die unsere Kunden abbilden, Differenzierungen vorzunehmen, die auch vom Unternehmenstyp und von der Firmen-/Mitarbeiterstruktur abhängen. Es galt z. B. herauszufinden, ob es Vollzeit Einkäufer oder Doppel- und Mehrfachfunktionen in den Betrieben gibt, damit wir sicherstellen können, dass alle involvierten Mitarbeiter adäquat für ihre spezifischen Aufgaben durch ihren Plattform-Account unterstützt werden und sich wieder finden. Dadurch lösen wir komplexe Anforderungen und stellen einen maßgeschneiderten Rollen-/Aufgaben-spezifischen Umgang mit Heidelberg-Assistant sicher, der durch eigene Sub-Accounts ausdifferenziert werden kann.

Was ist für Sie persönlich das Spannendste an dem Projekt? Und wie wird es sich weiterentwickeln?

Tom Oelsner: Das Spannendste ist, dass erstmals eine Plattform mit einer Vielzahl von Interaktions-Möglichkeiten in Echtzeit entsteht. Damit erfüllen wir die Anforderungen der Platform-Economy und portieren diese in transparenter Form auf das Print-Produktions-Geschäft. Das Kunden-Feedback ist ausgezeichnet, mögliche Akzeptanzschwellen werden rasch überwunden. Die Weiterentwicklung vollziehen wir in drei Richtungen.

1. Reichweite: Weitere Kunden in den vier Pilot-Ländern ansprechen, um dort möglichst viele, am besten alle Heidelberg-Kunden einzubeziehen, sowie für die Plattform-Nutzung weitere Ländern erschließen wie Japan und China.

2. Produkt-Integration: Bis dato sind alle Produkte von Heidelberg-bereits integriert, aber noch nicht in gleicher Tiefe. Nach und nach wollen wir den Leistungsumfang für alle Heidelberg- und OEM-Produkte erweitern und beispielsweise die Ausfallvorhersage auch über Sheetfed-Maschinen hinaus anbieten..

3. Innovation: Derzeit haben wir über 200 neue Ideen aus den Teams, die wir auf technische Machbarkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit prüfen und in neue Releases einarbeiten. Das nächste Release der jetzigen Fassung Heidelberg Assistant 1 kommt bereits im März 2018, weitere werden dann durch extrem schnelle Zyklen alle drei Monate folgen.

Übrigens: Der Zuspruch intern bei Heidelberg, also aus der Kollegenbasis, ist fantastisch. Das alles zusammen macht große Freude und zeigt, dass wir auf dem richtigen Weg sind, die digitale Transformation Wirklichkeit werden zu lassen.

Vielen Dank für das informative Gespräch!


 

tom-oelsner-foto.256x256

Zur Person

Tom Oelsner studierte an der Technischen Universität Dresden und schloss als Diplom-Informatiker ab. Seit 1990 war er für Linotype-Hell AG in verschiedenen Software-Entwicklungsbereichen/-Funktionen tätig. Seit 2002 entwickelte er als Program-Manager für Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG die Remote Services/Heidelberg Cloud; 2008 wurde er Vice President Enterprise & Services und seit Oktober 2010 treibt er als SVP Sales Excellence Digitalisierungsprojekte für Heidelberg und seine Kunden voran.

 


 

%d bloggers like this: