Advertisements

Archive

Tag Archives: digital age

ValueCheck DOG Heidelberg Assistant.001

Revealing: Great conversation about the Heidelberg Assistant at the pharmaceutical service provider D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt, Germany. Photo: Heidelberg

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

 


“For me, Heidelberg Assistant is a tool that is very important to our digitization strategy, one that is indispensable for the future.”— Andre Gass, IT specialist and senior executive at D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt


 

Managing processes with the aid of digital communications creates transparency in real time for complex technical procedures and takes industrial print production to a whole new level. This was the most important insight gleaned from the follow-up meeting with D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt. 

The aim of the meeting was to examine the use of the Heidelberg Assistant as a central digital management platform in a highly specialized print shop. D.O.G. was represented at this meeting by senior executive Andre Gass, who, as a qualified IT specialist, deals primarily with the Heidelberg Assistant and intelligent data analysis for the operational and technical management of the print shop. Tom Oelsner, Head of Innovation at the Heidelberg Digital Unit, also attended the meeting on behalf of Heidelberg.

 


Information box

Precision and reliability based on flexibility and innovation

D.O.G. GmbH is a family business and has specialized in work for customers in the German and European pharmaceutical industry and the cosmetic and airline sectors since it was founded in 1996. The solutions in its portfolio include sophisticated print products and services such as packaging inserts, booklets, standard labels, piggyback labels, outserts, folding cartons, labels for folding cartons, design and consulting services, logistics, and engineering. Everything at D.O.G. is genuine precision work, which is monitored by customers through audits. Founder and Managing Director Johann Gass has ushered in a new era so that his company can meet the requirements of the digital age in the best way possible. Three of his children have also joined the team. D.O.G. runs production operations at two sites in western Darmstadt and has been using the Heidelberg Assistant since June 2018. 

The Heidelberg Assistant is a universal web platform that allows various users to digitally manage all the relevant aspects of a print shop. These aspects include, for instance, the printing technology in use (including performance measurement and predictive monitoring), support, purchasing through an eShop, and administration. The combined use of Heidelberg IDs and customer-/employee-specific dashboards supports personalized access to the system and allows companies to integrate all specific components in a customized and scalable way. The Heidelberg Cloud ensures the best possible connectivity and provides an optimum means of sharing data and knowledge. After being launched initially in Germany, Switzerland, the USA, and Canada, the project was rolled out in Japan in July 2018. And there are more countries to come. The platform has an open design and can even integrate products from other manufacturers. The basic version is available to all customers free of charge.


 

Useful to customers from day one!

“Following the launch with around 30 customers in December 2017, it is clear that industrial customers with an affinity for services and cutting-edge equipment draw particular benefit from the Heidelberg Assistant. Right now, there are already over 200 customers using the Assistant. There’ll be 500 by the end of the year,” Oelsner states confidently. The aim is to make both the platform and Heidelberg Cloud meet the highest security standards.

Oelsner sees his collaboration with IT specialist Andre Gass as the perfect opportunity to put the platform through its paces and make sure it continues to evolve. Thanks to the modular design of the Assistant, new customer requirements can be integrated as add-ons as necessary. A new release goes live every three months. “The capacity utilization is very high right from the start. There are many customers who use the Heidelberg Assistant several times a week, some even daily,” explains Oelsner.

 

Tom Oelsner IMG_4927

Tom Oelsner, Head of Innovation at Heidelberg Digital Unit, is pushing the digital transformation forward. Photo: Andreas Weber

 

This high intensity of use appears to be rather consistent across the individual markets, although market penetration has progressed furthest in Switzerland: “The Assistant offers the widest range of applications for customers with machines connected to the Heidelberg Cloud. In Switzerland, around 50 percent of this customer group already uses the Assistant, mainly to boost productivity and get advance warning of potential failures.” The feature in highest demand appears to be the service status, which, thanks to its traffic-light system, can be checked at a glance. 

The ability to customize the platform makes it particularly appealing to users – this even includes assigning names to machines and photos of installed machines and print shop employees. 

Oelsner explains: “It’s really important to us that we can put the customer at the very heart of what we do. That means we make it possible for our customers to give their staff exactly the support they need for their respective tasks. For instance, employees can select the events for which they would like to receive a messenger or email notification. “Do you still use the telephone or do you use the Heidelberg Assistant?” That has to be the question we ask customers – because they can now track service processes, spare part deliveries, predicted failures, and productivity 24/7 without having to make a single call. 

The many benefits of digital communication and smart automation

Managing maintenance operations has to be a key focal point for industrial print shops, as Gass is well aware. The Assistant automatically generates a maintenance calendar, which helps customers find the best way to incorporate various machines into production planning. After all, downtimes lower productivity and so, in principle, should not occur unless scheduled. Maximizing the availability of production systems is important, first and foremost, in giving print shops the flexibility they need when plans change because the customer has moved a deadline. Workflows must always be designed to achieve maximum productivity. 

“Digital communication with Heidelberg Service, either through the Assistant’s messaging system or the eCall functions [for instance, the machine automatically reports and documents signs of faults], really takes a lot of weight off our shoulders. Nothing gets lost, and all processes are always running at optimum level,” Gass explains. He appreciates the platform’s clear structure, transparency, and user-friendliness. 

“Our core values of reliability, commitment to quality, flexibility, and innovation are fully reflected in the Assistant, which helps us considerably when it comes to doing the best possible job in the interest of our customers,” adds Gass.

Gass worked very closely with the Heidelberg Assistant while preparing for the installation of a new Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106-2-P. “We take a very methodical and structured approach to everything we do, and always push ourselves to the limit when it comes to performance and quality. This is because customer requirements, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, are extremely high.” Gass has been very impressed by the way Heidelberg makes the premium technology of its hardware and software both transparent and simple to use. 

“We’re really benefiting from everything the Assistant is making possible because reaching a high level of digitization is very much a priority, not just for us but also for our customers. This is because one of our core missions is to create the best possible interfaces to our customers’ highly diverse systems,” explains Gass. Orders are sent to the print shop digitally and can then be managed and monitored on an entirely digital basis and optimized using process management where appropriate. 

 

20180906_Bild_3_HDA-DOG-Weber_L096_1

Andre Gass (left) and Tom Oelsner enjoyed their conversation. Photo: Heidelberg

 

As a result, it may become necessary to create an interface between the Heidelberg Assistant and the ERP system at D.O.G. for future use. Oelsner adds: “A system connection is already being tested for error messages. This allows the customer’s system to send an XML file to the Assistant for electronic processing without an employee having to fill out a new form.”

However, it is important to make full use of the wide range of options already available first, primarily with regard to the platform’s add-on options, and particularly those relating to performance measures. The basic version of the Assistant provides the customer with KPIs. Additional options for more detailed analysis can be agreed in a separate contract.

Important outcomes: Speed, error prevention, convenience functions

Gass has been impressed by the integration of the Heidelberg eShop, which is tailored to the specific needs of his company: “We have preconfigured shopping lists, and it only takes a few clicks to put together the right order. The eShop range adapts to our requirements and selects the consumables we actually need. Incorrect orders are now a thing of the past. Even today, the Heidelberg eShop is already designed to work fast.

According to Oelsner, it takes an average of 70 seconds to place an order using shopping lists. In the future, the necessary order volumes will be calculated on a predictive basis using key data from production and the customer will be advised on when to place an order, so that no surplus stock has to be stored in the print shop.

With the exception of a completely autonomous ordering process, which will be available in future configurations of the Assistant, the print shop could not have chosen a more dependable procurement system. 

 

20180906_Bild 1_ HDA-DOG-Weber_L020

Andre Gass, IT specialist and senior executive at D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt puts digitization in the focus to strengthen the printing business.

 

There is another feature of the Assistant that Gass finds particularly practical – users can intervene if necessary, and are not solely reliant on automation. Oelsner goes on to discuss the feedback he’s gotten from many customers: “All kinds of additional documents, such as text, images and video, can be sent to Heidelberg using the service system, even an audio file of a rattling sound, which would be difficult to explain otherwise.” 

For Gass, this represents a significant improvement to communication and a noticeable increase in the speed and quality of troubleshooting. He also believes it is important the system documents what it does, so as to create transparency for the management team. 

Gass summarizes his experience with the Assistant: “For me, Heidelberg Assistant is a tool that is very important to our digitization strategy, one that is indispensable for the future. What’s more, everything we’re familiar with in terms of modern digital communication through social media in our private lives is also offered by the Assistant for our business matters: Messenger and chat functions, notifications, and much more. Everything is recorded automatically in timelines and can be researched later on.”

 


 

DOG Kompakt

Screenshot from D.O.G.’s website. 

 


 

My take – times are changing. And that’s perfect!

In the print business, there is still a lot that can be done much better as part of a smart digitization strategy driven by IT expertise. This is particularly true when tech manufacturers, like Heidelberg in the case of the Heidelberg Assistant, create innovative, scalable and interactive platforms that print shops can use in structured, personalized and creative ways. 

At D.O.G. in Darmstadt, they aren’t just aware of this – they’re actively integrating it into their new business strategy, making it an important part of this new era in the company’s management. This is all the more fitting, as D.O.G. aims for the highest level of quality and precision based on its clearly defined company values. 

Digital communication at every step in the industrial print manufacturing process is a must if you want to take a modern approach to business operations and the concerns of end customers. 

If all necessary business communication between the tech manufacturer and the customer in the printing industry can be optimized to such a degree, then everyone wins – with mutual benefits, profitable growth and sustainable development in business activities! —Andreas Weber

 


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been a print expert and internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer, and networker for over 25 years. His activities focus on transformation for the digital age and include lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses, reports, and strategic advice. – His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires readers from over 150 countries worldwide.

About ValueBlog IMG_9105


 

Advertisements
ThinkPaper BlogPost Fraser Church.001

Print ad out of a campaign by ‘internet.org by Facebook’, designed by Sid Lee, U.S.A.

 

#Think!Paper — Edition 1, Volume 2

”I believe Think!Paper’s stance of recognising the role of print in a digital age will help address this  issue and fill an incredible void in knowledge in an ever-shifting communication environment.”

 

By Fraser Church

 

I applaud the initiative of Think!Paper. This addresses a number of issues that have become prevalent in recent years particularly in the communication industry. 

Today’s marketers have been brought up on digital and social media as being the default form of customer communication, with the much-heralded cry of “digital first” becoming increasingly common. However, the question is whether they are listening to their customers, or whether they are getting carried away on the digital wave whilst at the same time being influenced by perceived efficiencies based more on cost than actual return on investment.

Brands are increasingly focussing on Customer Experience and optimising the customer journey; however, to do that properly, marketers need to recognise that a decision to make a purchase is as much emotional as rational these days. Brand trust, values and relationships are increasingly important in a world where there is a narrowing in product differentiation. As part of building that relationship, it is important for brands to understand which media to use when and for which messaging. 

Print is perhaps the most trusted medium.

Remember the phrase “I would like to see that in writing”. So, when something needs consideration, or has to be seen as authoritative, print can be a great medium. Print Is also the only channel that can impact on one of our most important senses of touch. Indeed, in my later years at Paragon I spend considerable time persuading clients of the value of increasing the production values of their printed output, and thus cost, to help subliminally re-enforce brand values. 

You could for example question whether a Tiffany shopping bag is perhaps an accessory as much as a means of getting goods home. At the same time, you have to be careful not to over play your hand; for example, charities would never use a coated stock, as this would seem to go against their environmental and cost saving credentials (even though recycled paper can cost more!).

But this does not mean everything should be printed.

Email is a great means to deliver offers, newsletters and access to the depth of content that the online environment can provide. Mobile, whilst being often seen as an invasive medium, is perhaps the best way to remind people of a medical or retail appointments, or increasingly keep them up-to-date in real time about their purchase deliveries; and with the advent of 5G networks they will increasingly deliver richer experiences. Apps are a great way for people to manage their life, for example online banking or travel. Whilst social media lets us reach audiences at pace, in an informal and engaging manner.

The issue is that whilst a digital revolution is undoubtedly taking place, interested parties have been perhaps a bit blinkered. The Print Industry has tended to take great pleasure at criticizing digital media whenever it can. On the other hand, the digital communication industry has just ignored print as irrelevant. It is not either or. It is not one or the other. The true power is recognising how brands can use all of the media to their best advantage, optimising customer journeys and building long-term relationships. I believe Think!Paper’s stance of recognising the role of print in a digital age will help address this issue and fill an incredible void in knowledge in an ever-shifting communication environment.

Finally, what about Digital Transformation?

Digital Transformation is often misunderstood. It is not about making sure that all communication is sent via email or mobile; it is about using technology to make it more efficient for businesses to both operate and deliver more engaging experiences for the customer. It is an innovation enabler, allowing new business, operational and communication models. 

However, this does not preclude print, and it should always be considered as a channel to be used to undertake specific roles. For example, whilst comparison websites may help you find the best mortgage, and banks want you to complete applications online, the issuing of printed legal document, welcome pack and annual statements can provide reassurance and feeling of security for customers. 

Also, we should remember that not all consumers are digital natives and a considerable proportion of the population have grown up enjoying and trusting print as a media.

So, whilst Digital Transformation will be responsible for creating a number of digital only brands such as Uber, the majority of companies partaking in digital transformation will still find there is a role, and a productive one at that, for print in their business model.

 

 


About Fraser Church

Fraser_Church

Fraser Church is an independent communication consultant and also General Manager of CPX Group — a co-operative of nine of the world’s largest and most innovative print and digital communication companies.

Fraser, who has a degree in Economics, started his career in consumer marketing working for a number of the UK’s leading brands. He then transferred his allegiances to the agency world as a director of RMP a data driven one-to-one communication agency specialising in customer loyalty in the retail sector.

He cut his teeth in the new digital world by setting up a dot.com company in 1999, providing consumers with an online resource for ordering catalogues and brochures. Fraser subsequently moved on to create some of the world’s earliest and most successful variable digital print applications for DSI who eventually became part of the Paragon Group.

Fraser was most recently Head of Creative Development at Paragon, particularly enjoying spending time with clients evangelising about how print plays an important part in customer journeys in an ever-increasing digital world.

He currently became a member of our #Think!Team to support the #Think!Paper initiative and to enrich knowledge sharing.

Contact via LinkedIn


 

 

ThinkPpaer Key Visual Blog Post.001

#Think!Paper the key facts at a glance

What we do
We evaluate and profile print and its proponents as an effective driving force for transformation – across all industries!

Our mission
We show, first and foremost, that print is by no means driftwood in an ocean of transformation (with Titanic-style effects) but rather a solid anchor for the ‘tsunamis in our heads’!

Our USP

  • We are bringing together the brightest minds to form interdisciplinary #Think!Teams with a global outlook. 
  • We are building up the finest pool of expertise with a clear focus on interaction, discourse, customer experience and sustainable conversations.
  • We are reinforcing the bedrock of any successful ‘digital’ transformation – proficient, dynamic and meaningful communication.

Benefits for our partners
We help our partners make new and market-relevant discoveries that inspire them and inject new energy into their development.

 


German Version

The status quo

Print in context with digital transformation

Much is mixed up or misrepresented in the discussions regarding “digital transformation” in the context of print. Success factors and new potentials are hardly achievable. At least, it certainly does not have to be mentioned that print production is a 100 percent data-driven and thus digital process, with constantly new and unique applications. But, where is the beef?

Challenge: Solutions available — and who knows?

Communication about a product is as important as the product or service itself.

What if there are highly complex technical solutions that could enable customers or customers’ customers to better manage and profit from the process of digital innovation and the necessary transformation?

Learn from communication errors

When it comes to understanding, informing, convincing, finding acceptance or even influencing opinions — be it employees, customers, potential customers, shareholders or even the media for the public — all of us obviously did not everything right but probably too much wrong.

Current sales figures and stock market prices on a low/declining level speak for itself.

01-ThinkPaper Handout

The solution: #Think!Paper

Based on an exchange of views, knowledge and experience, we have developed an innovative approach to business communication, which itself is the best example of innovation and transformation.

While the well-known form of the static ’White Paper’ points out problems in the existing and designs possible solutions, the newly developed format of the #Think!Paper offers a dynamic form of expert communication via conversation based on perpetuum mobile-effects:

We use our profound knowledge to gain insights in an ongoing dialogue, to question things wisely, and to clarify in dialogue with others. Transformation can only succeed if we align communication with human-to-human relationships.

How does it work?

Think!Paper appears as a novel, cross-media, interactive publication designed as a sequel and compatible with the essence of transformation: research, analysis, assessment, insights and recommendations are always in flux.

Updates will be done by the publishers / authors in the team with selected-qualified partners as contributors.

In addition to a strong social media presence, the centerpiece is the ValueBlog, with excerpts appearing in the DRUCKMARKT (PDF magazines and print editions). As a special edition of the DRUCKMARKT collections, the Think!Paper is available to partners and subscribers for individual use.

Selected partners are actively involved and part of the conversation: Technology manufacturers and users who demonstrably contribute to the transformation of and with print for the digital age.

Together we reduce complexity and create clarity — promised!

The most important topics at a glance:

  • What is actually meant by “digital transformation”?
  • What role does print play?
  • Which benefits are available?
  • Where do we stand (Best Practice)?
  • Where do we have to go (Strategy & Outlook)?

Start: August 2018 — Destination: #drupa2020


 

 


Andreas_Nico

The publisher and author team: Andreas Weber, Head of Value, and Klaus-Peter Nicolay, publisher DRUCKMARKT.

 


Further information and contact

We would be happy to talk to you specifically about how you / your company can contribute and participate.

Andreas Weber as coordinator can be reached via:

Mail: zeitenwende007(at)gmail.com

Or via LinkedIn.

 


Read as well #Think!Paper — Edition 1, Volume 1: Print for the Digital Age

#Think!Paper #PDA Sommer Weber.001

 


 

ValueCheckXeroxForum 2018 Keyvisual.001

Wow! Nach der Krise folgt die Katharsis. — Wer hätte das gedacht: Xerox geht aus all den heftigen Streitereien in den Top-Führungsgremien des Konzerns gestärkt hervor. Es scheint, als habe man nicht einfach den ‚Re-Set-Button‘ gedrückt, sondern die Firma konnte aus sich heraus sich quasi komplett neu erschaffen! Und das auf Basis von ‚Core Values‘, die Xerox aus meiner Sicht seit jeher ausmachen und die entscheidend sind, um wie Phoenix aus der Asche zu steigen: Team-Geist, ungebrochene Innovationskraft, Offenheit und Kollegialität, Verantwortungs-Bewusstsein und emphatisches Gespür für das, was sich ändern muss.


Von Andreas Weber, Head of Value

 


English summary

#XeroxForum 2018: WOW! Digital can be more human!

After all those negative headlines about the proxy fight at Xerox, it seems even more exciting to look around personally at the #XeroxForum 2018 in Warsaw from May 22, 2018 to May 24, 2018 to assess the state of affairs.

My insights: Wow! After the crisis follows the catharsis. 

Who would have thought that? Xerox emerges strengthened from all the fierce quarrels in the top executive bodies of the group. It seems like you have not just pressed the ‘Re-Set-Button’, but the company could almost completely re-create itself! And on the basis of ‘Core Values’, the Xerox in my view from time immemorial and are crucial to rise like Phoenix from the ashes: team spirit, uninterrupted innovation, openness and collegiality, sense of responsibility and an empathetic sense for that, what needs to change.

Conclusion: It’s all about #hyperpersonalization.

Above all, the new task of Xerox is to shape the digital transformation so that human needs are not neglected.

 


Prolog

Nicht erst seit einigen Wochen, seit vielen Jahren kommt Xerox nicht mehr aus den Negativ-Schlagzeilen heraus. Dem Schlingerkurs in der Unternehmensstrategie seit 2010 folgten derbe Umsatzeinbrüche im Office-Solutions- und Highend-Printing-Sektor, Restrukturierungen bis hin zum Split Ende 2016 und aktuell ein bis dato nicht für möglich gehaltener offener Streit mit zwei Hauptaktionären. Das Kernproblem bis dato: Wie erreicht man starkes Wachstum durch eine pro-aktive Zukunftsplanung? Das größte Übel: Auf der Stelle treten!


“Hence, #Xerox is today a gradually melting iceberg, but far from a catastrophe.“ Source: Fortune May 21st, 2018: Paper Jam! How Carl Icahn And a Billionaire Partner Blocked Xerox’s Merger with Fujifilm

Foto Fortune Xerox


Umso spannender erschien es mir, mich auf dem global ausgerichteten #XeroxForum 2018 vom 22. Mai 2018 bis 24. Mai 2018 in Warschau persönlich umzuschauen, um zu beurteilen, wie der Stand der Dinge ist. 

Die Dramaturgie im Vorfeld konnte gar nicht besser sein:

Am Tag meiner Abreise nach Warschau schlug der o.g. Artikel in Fortune vom 21. Mai 2018 wie eine Bombe ein. Akribisch und tief gehend wurden alle Vertraulichkeiten offen gelegt, die durch aktuelle Gerichtsunterlagen dokumentierten, wie derb der Streit an der Spitze von vier ‚alten‘ Männern eine Unternehmens-Ikone wie Xerox nachhaltig beschädigt. (Darwin Deasen, Carl Icahn, Jeff Jacobson und Shigetaka Komori sind zusammen über 300 Jahre alt, letztlich alle geprägt von Egozentrik inkl. einem extremen Hunger nach Macht und Geld.)

Zum ersten Forums-Tag erinnerte mich Facebook an ein Foto aus meinem Account, dass exakt 10 Jahre alt ist. Es zeigt die unvergessliche Anne Mulcahy noch als Chairman & CEO von Xerox Corp., die mir erklärte, wie stolz und zufrieden sie sein könne, dass Xerox seine Innovationsführerschaft in einer solch guten Verfassung zukunftsorientiert auf solidem Fundament ausbauen kann. Insofern könne sie beruhigt den Stab als Chefin weitergeben…

 

Anne Mulcahy drupa 2008

 


Zerrbild oder Realität: Xerox — ‚ein schmelzender Eisberg‘?

Anna Naruszko, Chefredakteurin Poligrafika and Opakowanie Magazines, war vom #XeroxForum 2018 in ihrer Heimatstadt Warschau sichtlich beeindruckt. Sie sei quasi in ein Dilemma geraten, das sie so noch nicht kannte. Am Tag nach dem Event fielen ihr beim Interview mit Xerox-Top-Manager Andrew Copley kaum noch offene Fragen ein. „Das XeroxForum war perfekt organisiert, alles auf den Punkt gebracht, hoch informativ, unterhaltsam und inspirierend — ohne uns Zuhörer zu überfrachten“, sagte sie mir unmittelbar im Anschluss.

Andrew Copley, President, Graphic Communications Solutions,  hatte beim Presse- und Analysten-Briefing klar und ohne Umschweife Position bezogen. Copley betonte, dass Xerox trotz vieler Medienberichte zum ‚Proxy Fight’  im Tagesgeschäft völlig Intakt sei: „Daily business and operations aren‘t infected and absolutely stable“. 

Dass Copley Recht hat, ließ sich in meinen Gesprächen mit vielen der rund 500 Teilnehmern überprüfen. Nicht nur Top-Kunden aus aller Welt, sondern auch Händler und Partnerunternehmen aus dem Software- und Papier-Sektor waren präsent. Tenor: Hohe Kompetenz und Innovationskraft von Xerox lassen uns alle zuversichtlich sein, die Transformation-Journey im Digitalzeitalter bestens zu überstehen, weil Print durch Xerox-Innovationen auf vielen Ebenen stark bleibt.


Trumpfkarte ‚Hyperpersonalisierung‘

Was die Zukunft von uns allen ausmachen wird, erläuterte engagiert und motivierend Toni Clayton-Hine, SVP, Chief Marketing Officer, Xerox Corporation. Sie betonte was nicht nur für Xerox selbst, sondern vor allem für seine Kunden, Händler und Partner wichtig sei, um in allen Märkten Erfolg zu haben: #hyperpersonalization. 

Xerox habe sich entsprechend neu justiert, da nur so die Customer Experience inklusive Customer Benefits und Customer Relations als das Maß aller Dinge in den Fokus rücken können. 

 

‚Hyperpersonalisierung‘? Schon wieder so ein ‚Buzz-Word’ um eine neue Sau durchs Dorf zu treiben? Nein, keinesfalls! ‚Hyperpersonalisierung‘ ist existentiell von Belang, trifft den Nerv von Kunden im Digitalzeitalter und hindert daran, von den dunklen Seiten der Digitalisierung gepackt, als Individuum in Anonymität und Bedeutungslosigkeit zu versinken.

Das Besondere an #hyperpersonalization

Während ‚personalisierter Service‘ häufig bedeutet, den Kunden beim Namen zu nennen und seine Präferenzen zu verfolgen, wird der Umgang mit dem Kunden durch Hyperpersonalisierung auf ein viel höheres Niveau gehoben — mit weitaus höherem, persönlichen Nutzen. Denn es geht primär darum, Kundendaten in Echtzeit zu entschlüsseln, zu bearbeiten und v. a. in den Kontext zu stellen, mit dem was Win-Win-Szenarien leisten müssen.

Zum Bild: In der Mode- und Kosmetik-Welt ist Hyperpersonalisierung bereits angekommen. Siehe Instagram @londaprof oder YouTube: https://youtu.be/RNVA_PcbeGo

Fakt ist: Kunden von heute haben eine völlig andere Erwartungshaltung. Sie möchten mit Unternehmen und Marken interagieren, die sie als Individuum identifizieren, die ihnen sofortigen Zugriff auf Informationen über jede Interaktion in jedem Kanal bieten. Und die Probleme sofort verstehen und wissen, wie sie es lösen können, basierend auf den erfassten Daten. Das ganze kann und muss konform sein mit den Datenschutzrichtlinien.

Für Toni Clayton-Hine zeigt sich, dass Xerox dabei seine Stärken und Kompetenzen voll zur Entfaltung bringen kann. „Print in seinen modernen, durch Digitaltechnologien angereicherten Möglichkeiten, spielt im Kontext mit #hyperpersonalization eine ganz maßgebliche und auch auf lange Zeit unverzichtbare Rolle“, sagte sie mir im persönlichen Gespräch. Darauf sei nicht nur das Xerox-Leistungsangebot, sondern auch das Marketing von Xerox auf allen Ebenen ausgerichtet. 

Des Pudels Kern: Konversationen!

Dass dieser Anspruch von Toni Clayton-Hine ernst gemeint ist und kein bloßes Marketing-Palaver sein kann, zeigte sich mir in den letzten Wochen: Beinahe täglich war ich seit Anfang Mai 2018 auf der xerox.com-Website, um zusehen, was es zu den Konzernführungs-Streitigkeiten Neues gibt. 

 


Bildschirmfoto 2018-05-26 um 12.32.11 Screenshot von der Xerox Corp. Website per 26. Mai 2018


 

Ich wurde durchgehend vom 9. Mai 2018 bis dato (26. Mai 2018) auf die neueste Innovation von Xerox im Print hingewiesen, die auch auf dem #XeroxForum 2018 in Warschau zelebriert wurde: Iridesse – eine faszinierende neue Technologiebasis, die „BeyondCMYK“ das Digitaldrucken auf Premium-Niveau mit einem Feuerwerk an zusätzlichen Metallic-Farben in sog. One-Pass-Verfahrensweise, also in einem integrierten, durchgängigen Prozess, auf einer Vielzahl von Bedruckstoffen ermöglicht. So stark und gut platziert war bis dato bei Xerox auf Konzernebene noch keine Print-Innovation!

Beachtenswert: Jacob Aizikowitz, Präsident der Xerox-Tochter XMPIE, brachte auf den Punkt, worum es in seinen HiTech-Workflow- und Software-Anwendungen tatsächlich geht: „At least: it’s all about storytelling!“. 


 

XMPie Jacob Key Visual.001

Storytelling ist kein Luxus. Sondern ein Muss!

Im Nachgang zum #XeroxForum ergab sich zu meinem o. g. Echzeit-Post eine interessante, ergänzende Diskussion auf LinkedIn. Jacob Aizikowitz führte in einem Kommentar weiter aus, was aus seiner Sicht unter Storytelling im Kontext mit Multichannel zu verstehen ist:

Its not fairytale stories… and its perfectly OK to collaborate with an Agency in order to invent, tell, and execute the ‘story’. Its not enough these days to say that you do just print; nor is it enough to say that you know how to do PURLs. These days you need to talk Customer Experience… Engagement… Journeys from touch point to touch point, moving between Print and Digital, outbound and inbound, leading towards some desired goal of success.

A hot example is the story of engaging a consumer via the package of the goods they purchased. The package’s QR code leads the consumer mobile into a landing site… interaction adds more data, helps identify desires, and maybe followed with an email and a coupon landing in the consumer’s e-Wallet. This is story-telling.

You need to know how to tell such story in order to get the job from your client. They need to be engaged by your story. And in order to create such stories, one needs experience, imagination, innovation, and a good set of tools for sketching, developing, telling, interacting, deploying, and managing the execution of all journeys that flow from the story.

Meine Ergänzung:

Fully agreed, Jacob Aizikowitz. — Addendum: But don‘t forget that it‘s also a challenge to have a best-in-class storytelling approach to communicate properly (mainly by Social Media in real-time!) that you are a storyteller in the way you described it.

 


 

Mit andern Worten: Die Aufgabe von Xerox ist vor allen Dingen, die digitale Transformation so zu gestalten, dass dabei menschliche Bedürfnisse und relevante Konversationen  nicht zu kurz kommen und persönliche Belange jederzeit beim Einsatz von digitalen Medientechnik-Prozessen zu berücksichtigen sind. 

Multichannel erhält dadurch eine neue Dimension: Humanity — Menschlichkeit! Das passt in Zeiten von Social Media, Social Responsibility und Social Selling perfekt ins Bild. — Der kanadische Musiker und Bestseller-Autor David Usher zeigte in seiner herausragenden multimedialen Präsentation wie im Mix aus persönlichem Vortrag, Live-Gesang, witzig-pointierten Charts, Videos (u.a. mit seiner kleinen Tochter) und dem Dialog mit dem Publikum des #XeroxForum vom Menschen erschaffene Kreativleistung inszeniert werden kann. #Benchmark


 

Neue Chancen. Neues Glück?

Die Art und Weise, wie das #XeroxForum 2018 konzipiert und durchgeführt wurde, haben das Publikum wie auch mich nachhaltig begeistert. Das Forum war (wie sonst vielfach üblich) kein Show-Act, um möglichst stark zu beeindrucken! Alle Beteiligten waren mit Herz und Verstand dabei und schafften einen Konsens für alle Branchenvertreter aus dem globalen Print-Business, dem sich niemand entziehen konnte. Dazu trug auch bei, dass die Referenten durchweg smart, eloquent und sympathisch ihr Publikum zu keiner Zeit aus den Augen verloren. Entsprechend funktionierte das Networking und Miteinander ganz hervorragend.

Ein wichtiger Indikator für den Erfolg: Das Echt-Zeit-Feedback via Social Media war phänomenal. Allein per Twitter wurden über 2,6 Millionen Impressions während des Events erreicht. Zehntausende reagierten auf der Business-Plattform LinkedIn. 

Zugleich zeigte sich, dass die eingangs zitierten Streitigkeiten auf Top-Führungsebene nach außen mehr Schaden anrichteten als Spuren im Inneren des Konzerns zu hinterlassen: Iridesse als komplexes Entwicklungsprojekt von Xerox mit Fuji Xerox litt und leidet unter keinerlei Schwierigkeiten im Miteinander. Im Gegenteil, die heterogenen Teams aus den USA und Japan verstehen sich bestens. Weiteres ist in der Pipeline.


Epilog

Zwei kleine ‚Schönheitsfehler‘ gab es am Rande des #XeroxForum 2018 zu beobachten:

  1. Es wurde wie in der Branche üblich noch immer darüber spekuliert, dass Druckereien / Print Service Provider nunmehr doch endlich Marketing Services Provider werden müssten. — Hoppla! Das ist Quatsch! Druckerei zu sein, ist auch im Digitalzeitalter keine Schande. Warum auch? Druckereien müssen mit dem was sie gut können einfach ‚nur’ einen richtig guten Job machen und stets über Innovations-Lösungen zeigen, dass Print werthaltig und heute wie morgen unverzichtbar ist. — Wenn schon ein neuer Begriff, dann doch eher: ‚Print Innovation Solution Partner‘. Kurz: #PISP. Oder?
  2. In einem Workshop wurde Druckereien anhand eines 10-Punkte-Plans pragmatisch erklärt, wie sie sich vernünftig präsentieren und ihre Geschäfts-Kommunikations- und -Marketing-Aufgaben optimieren. Ganz anschaulich und in den Anforderungen moderat, fast so, wie man das vor zehn Jahren hätte machen sollen. Für 99 Prozent der Teilnehmer war dies dennoch Neuland — und wird es wohl für viele auch künftig bleiben, je schneller die ‚Digital Transformation‘-Journey voranschreitet. — Autsch! — Aber die Hoffnung stirbt bekanntlich zuletzt.


#XeroxForum 2018 via Twitter— ein starker Erfolg!

 

: Great success for on — 2,684,548 impressions by 113 contributors! — Most active: #1 #2 #3 | Results via

 


 

Video mit Galapräsentation

 


 

Die wichtigsten Tweets im Überblick

Per Value-Echtzeit-Report via Twitter Moments gibt es einen umfassenden und rasch erfahrbaren Überblick über alles Wichtige auf dem #XeroxForum 2018 (inklusive Fotos und Videos).


Addendum

Beispiel, wie Änderungen im Verbraucherverhalten durch Innovationen im Packaging auf innovative Weise ein Echo finden können.

 


 

Zum Autor

Andreas Weber ist Gründer und CEO von Value Communication AG. Als Analyst & Berater für Erfolg mit Print im Digitalzeitalter ist er zugleich auch globaler Netzwerker und Publizist. Sein Blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspiriert Nutzer/Leser aus über 130 Ländern.

About-ValueBlog-IMG_9105.jpg

 


 

ValueCheck Marina.001

Photos: http://designingforprint.com

 

By Marina Poropat Joyce, Designer, Print Activist and Author of Designing for Print

This is an article I wrote for Printing Impressions a while ago and rather than rewriting it, I think it is still apropos in its entirety. If you are a designer or a printer, you can use this to reach out to your customer/vendor and start a dialog that will improve your work and your project.


Note: Listen to the latest #printerverse podcast as well, listening to Deborah Corn’s conversation with Marina Poropat Joyce!


10 Things Printers can Teach Designers

Designers are visual people and the best way to teach a visual person is to show them. Graphic designers are also curious people who generally like to see how things work. We all walk around with our cameras all day, lauding their efficiency for email, Slack, twitter and more. But it is the instant transmission of images and videos that make showing easy-as-pie.

Here are 10 ways you can use your smartphone to reach out to your designer clients, add value to your company website and make life easier for yourself. (Sales managers, appoint one person to collect this kind of knowledge and disseminate to the whole sales team.)

1. Coated vs. Uncoated. Sit down with a designer and have two paper swatch books in front of you and explain coated paper versus uncoated paper. You will have saved yourself countless hours of “it looks like postcard paper” descriptions, and the like.

2. Bleeds. Take a video of your guillotine cutter in action, preferably a job with a bleed. Zoom in on the crop marks, text it to your designer client. (Put it on your website too!)

3. Grain. Look in your sample room for something with a nice black solid. Pull two samples. Fold one sample with the grain. Fold the other sample against the grain. Put them side-by-side folds-up and photograph with your phone. Open the image and crop to relevant image area and mark as a favorite in your phone for quick retrieval.

4. Waste=Cost. Show your client an illustration of paper waste for various page sizes. Here are some examples you can use: (Put it on your website too!)

 

5. Quantity matters. Walk into your pressroom and film a sheet-fed press at the delivery end while it is running for 30 seconds. Confirm run speed with pressman. Text video to the client explaining that’s how long it takes for (insert quantity here) brochures/posters, etc. to run through the press and why they should opt for digital printing on this short run. (At 15,000 iph 30 seconds is 125 sheets, 8-up that’s 1000 pieces!)

6. Printing is green. Calculate how many pounds of trim, corrugated and electronics you recycle each year (if your trim is picked up and weighed by a recycler they have this info). Next time your vendor picks up a container run out to the parking lot and take a pic. Put the photo on your website with an infographic of the tonnage you recycle annually. Explain that the trim and corrugated goes into future recycled paper products.

7. Ink can change color. Show your client this photo. Explain that the ink formulas with a high percentage of opaque white (basically all pastels) will shift within a year (swatch on left was two years old, on right 6 months, when photographed). Share that pastel colors are great for a short-lived item like an invitation not so great for an identity system.

 

 

8. Paper makes a difference. Next time you’ve got an attractive job with photos that’s going to run on white paper, order some extra sheets of ivory, canary and grey uncoated paper. Add those colored sheets to the job and photograph the same detail area of all four colors. Make a montage (easy with the Layout app for iPhone). Send this montage to a client who is wondering about running a job on colored stock and put it on your website too.

9. How to read a swatch book. Oh boy, if I had a penny for every time a customer found the “perfect paper” in a swatch book and placed an order specifying that sheet only to find out there wasn’t enough, or it wasn’t stocking or that the chosen color had been discontinued… This is a great topic to discuss at a quick lunch with a new customer. Text her an image showing how to look up the date of a swatch book. Then bring her some lunch and a few swatch books and show her how to “read” it.

10. Art takes time. Text your idea of a rudimentary schedule to your client as a pdf graphic they can print out and pin to their idea wall. Next time they are working with a client to develop a timeline they won’t guess and it saves them and you a call/email.

 

Printing-schedule-graphic-for-IG.jpg

 

I know that some will think that answering questions and fielding problems bring value to a client, and they do. But do they bring value to a business owner? If staff is reacting/interacting at the 100-foot level, how are they going to interact at the 30,000 foot level with intention? Focus on the little things with intention and planning and then the 30,000-foot questions aren’t as scary. What are your clients’ plans for next year? Are you discussing budgets internally? Are they planning on launching any new products or services within the next six months? These conversations are really easy when “what do I need a bleed for” is taken care of.

 


About The Author

Marina Poropat Joyce is a passionate paper geek who has been marketing, graphic designing, publishing and printing her whole life. She fell in love with design and printing early on, and founded one of the first design-to-print companies in Los Angeles. 

Her company INTAGLIO was ranked as one of the 50 fastest growing print companies in the country, a winner of Inc. Magazine’s Inner City 100 and one of Los Angeles’ top 100 women-owned companies.

She wrote Designing for Print to explain printing in graphic designer-speak after working with many frustrated designers who wanted to know more. Marina served on the board of the Printing Industries Association of Southern California (PIASC) as a board member and Chairman. Another joy she’s found other than seeing a design come to life in print was driving with her husband from London to Mongolia through 16 countries in a 9,600-mile rally.


Fan Resources

Twitter/Facebook Posts
For Twitter, you can include @designingprint and/or hashtag #DesigningForPrint

Social Media Accounts/Pages
Facebook Book Page: https://www.facebook.com/DesigningForPrint/
Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/MarinaPoropatJoyce/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/designingprint


About the Book Designing for Print

“As a design, print production professional and College level instructor on print and print for designers, your book is a much-needed tool that transports legacy print into the new world of print, which I call mutant print!”    —Thaddeus B. Kubis, Print Advocate, Designer, Professor

 


 

ValueCheck Inkjet Printing.001

Von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English Version

Prolog

Mein nun auch im ValueBlog publizierter Beitrag zu Inkjet-Printing war redaktioneller Teil einer erfolgreichen Premiere in der Schweiz! Zur 25-Jahrfeier bietet Herausgeber Martin Spaar mit seinem Team die erste, komplett individualisiert im Inkjet-Druck hergestellte Ausgabe. 

 


 

Wir stehen also an der Schwelle zu einem neuen Zeitalter der gedruckten Kommunikation. Denn was Individualisierung bringt und bewirken kann, erleben wir täglich im Web und speziell in den sozialen Netzwerken. Diese digitale Raffinesse verbunden mit der physischen Schlagkraft des Gedruckten hat ein riesiges Potenzial. —Martin Spaar 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-05-08 um 10.02.47

Zur Online-Ausgabe des gedruckten Magazins gehts per Klick!


 

Es vergeht kaum ein Tag, an dem nicht von Herstellerseite den Druckereien versprochen wird: Inkjet-Printing ist das Maß aller Dinge und eröffnet neue Märkte und Profite. Stimmt das? Ja und Nein. 

Ja, weil das Inkjet-Verfahren nicht mehr nur auf das Bedrucken von Papier oder Karton abzielt und damit über Nutzungsmöglichkeiten im klassischen Druck hinausführt. Sogar das Bedrucken dreidimensionaler Gegenstände ist möglich, wie z. B. Heidelberger Druckmaschinen und Xerox mit neuen Systemen wirkungsvoll beweisen.

Nein, weil damit einher geht, dass es schlicht nicht stimmt zu behaupten, man könne mit Inkjet-Printing den Offsetdruck ablösen oder aus dem Stand heraus ganz neue Anwendungsbereiche für die Druckbranche erschließen.

Genau hinschauen und abwägen, ist zwingend notwendig, um einen Tanz ums Goldene Kalb zu vermeiden. Hier eine Auswahl meiner aktuellen Beobachtungen: 

  1. Inkjet-Printing für den professionellen, hochproduktiven Druck ist relativ neu. Erfolgreiche Anwender in der Druckbranche lassen sich bis dato mit wenigen Fingern abzählen. Bei allen war der Schlüssel zum Erfolg nicht der Fokus auf die Drucktechnik, sondern auf die Pre-Media-Prozesse sowie das Finishing/die Verarbeitung inklusive Logistik/Distribution. Bestes Beispiel: Peter Sommer und Elanders Germany in Waiblingen. (Siehe Lesetipp unten)
  2. Hohe Inkjet-Druck-Volumen, auf die sich Hersteller gerne berufen, laufen seit langem im Transaktionsdruck, da man hier IT-Kompetenz mit Automation der Verarbeitung und Distribution nahtlos gestalten kann. (Übrigens der Grund, warum ein Big-Player wie Pitney Bowes in das Vermarkten von Digitaldrucktechnik eingestiegen ist).
  3. Es werden von den Herstellern mit Inkjet-Printing fokussiert neue Kundengruppen ausserhalb der Druckbranche und des Transaktionsdruck angesprochen. Canon Europa ist der Vorreiter, in dem es im Zuge der Reorganisation nach der drupa 2016 einen neuen Geschäftsbereich gegründet hat: Die Canon Graphic & Communications Group führt u. a. die Kreativwirtschaft sowie zahllose Branchen wie Architekten, Handwerker etc. mit neuen Systemen ans Inkjet-Drucken heran.
  4. Seit der drupa 2016 zeigt sich, dass die Inkjet-Revolution bei den Herstellern ihre Kinder frisst. HP genügt sich selbst (und optimiert statt innoviert). Landa kommt nicht von der Stelle. Bobst hat eine Kehrtwende vollzogen und mit Gründung der Mouvent AG die Neukonzeption für Inkjet-Printing durch eine clevere Cluster-Technik und anderes mehr vollzogen. Und Heidelberg hat im Team mit Fujifilm durch Primefire eine neue bahnbrechende Plattform für Hochqualitäts-Inkjet-Printing entwickelt, die im anspruchsvollen Verpackungsmarkt für Aufsehen und Anerkennung sorgt. 
  5. Traditionsunternehmen wie die Durst Group haben sich neu aufgestellt: Mit der P5-Philosophie wird alles darauf ausgerichtet und optimiert, was die Leistung und Verfügbarkeit der Drucksysteme maximiert sowie eine beispiellose Flexibilität in der Medien- und Auftragsabwicklung zulässt. Übrigens waren die Durst-Innovationen ein Highlight auf dem Online Print Symposium 2018 in München. 
  6. Es haben sich ganz neue Anbieter still und leise in Stellung gebracht, die mit neuen Systemarchitekturen individuell konfigurierbare, modulare Inkjet-Printing-Produkutionsanlagen ermöglichen, wie zum Beispiel die Firma Cadis Engineering aus Hamburg zeigt. Cadis kann z. B. HTML-Daten drucken und verzichtet aufs Rippen.
  7. Der eigentliche Gewinner bei Inkjet-Printing ist derzeit ein Hidden Champ: Der Bücherdruck. Xerox Europe zeigte dies eindrucksvoll Ende März im Team mit Book on Demand GmbH in Hamburg beim #Books2018 Event. Eine riesige, automatisierte Druckfabrik erzeugt in Echtzeit bis zu 25.000 Book-for-One-Produkte pro Tag. Wachstumstreiber sind die Impika-Inkjet-Drucksysteme von Xerox mit ausgeklügelter Hunkeler- und Müller-Martini-Technik zur Verarbeitung. Der Clou: Eine neue Impika-Tinte, die ungestrichene Papiere problemlos und bestens bedrucken kann.
  8. Last but not least: Wenn von massiver Substitution gesprochen werden kann, dann ersetzen Inkjet-Printing-System (Bogen wie Rolle) am ehesten bestehende Toner-Digitaldrucksysteme.

Fazit: Beim Inkjet-Printing wird und muss sich noch viel tun. Wir stehen erst am Anfang. Und müssen neu Denken lernen, um nicht in die Innovationsfalle zu tappen: Indem wir fälschlicherweise davon ausgehen, Inkjet-Printing sei primär dazu da, das was wir ohnehin im Druck tun können, zu verbessern.

Es geht daher weniger ums ‚schneller, besser, billiger‘, es geht vielmehr ums ‚neu, zeitgemäß und anders‘, um die komplexen Kommunikations-Herausforderungen des Digitalzeitalters zu meistern. — Think different!

 


Zum Autor

Andreas Weber ist Gründer und CEO von Value Communication AG. Als Analyst & Berater für Erfolg mit Print im Digitalzeitalter ist er zugleich auch globaler Netzwerker und Publizist. Sein Blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspiriert Nutzer/Leser aus über 130 Ländern.


 

Lesetipp: Peter Sommer im ValueCheck

Peter Sommer, Digitaldruck- und Inkjet-Pionier, Elanders Group: „Das Elanders-Konzept ist nicht auf eine bestimmte Drucktechnik fixiert. Die zentrale Frage ist immer, was mit einem Produkt erreicht werden soll und wie es zum Empfänger kommt. Die Integration in die Supply-Chain beginnt bei der Beratung der Kunden und hört bei der maßgeschneiderten Logistik auf.“

ValueCheck Peter Sommer Elanders ENG.001

 


 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Photo: Heidelberg

 


“In today’s digital age with its cutting-edge business models based on networks and platforms, everything needs to be transparent, in real time, and focused on enhancing customer benefits.” – Professor h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview and analysis by Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German version

Successful printing doesn’t just happen. It’s all down to innovative plans and putting these into action. That’s the main focus of Chief Digital Officer Professor Ulrich Hermann, member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG since November 2016. In an exclusive interview, he explains the principles of the ‘subscription economy’, which is now firmly established at Heidelberg and is set to bring about success right from the get-go.

 


 

Note: In April 2018 some new reports in the news came up. Handelsblatt published via its global edition some great observations: Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG begins to look less like a factory and more like an information processing hub for industrial operations.“ — MORE

And more subscription customers got on stage, like Klampfer Group in Austria.  Or Lensing Druck Group in Germany.

 


 

The subscription economy is taking Heidelberg as a market leader and its primarily industrial customers to the next level of the transformation process. For the first time, printing performance is being assessed and billed on a customized basis, thus representing a brand new development and a challenge for the print sector. Conventional billing methods, i.e. selling equipment at a fixed price in offset printing or click charge models in digital printing, are being replaced by subscription models. This has its benefits.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info box: What is the meaning behind ‘subscription economy’?

The subscription economy correlates with the fundamental transition toward customized buying and selling in the B2C, and increasingly in the B2B, sector. The focus has shifted away from acquiring and owning products toward long-term, flexible customer relationships and ongoing customer benefits. The resulting technical and organizational demands are high. Some subscription-based solutions already exist in the printing industry, such as standalone software-as-a-service agreements. Important factors include automation, scalability, complex data models, and changed accounting principles right through to analytics. A constant supply of information on customer satisfaction and, most importantly, the way products and services are used is essential to enable businesses to further customize their services. What’s more, this data also helps both the supplier and customer achieve greater growth. Studies show that in the United States – the birth place of digitization – the subscription economy is already well-developed, generating approximately 800 billion US dollars in added value in the past ten years alone.  – aw


 

What is it all about?

The subscription economy could become the main focus in our sector, too. It has already achieved great economic success in the United States but remains largely disregarded in Germany. What difference will it make?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Subscription models offer a new approach for generating value by consistently focusing on customer benefits. Primarily, this means the end of product-oriented business models whose added value derives from creating a product, rather than from the benefit customers gain from that product.

Companies with analog models focused on manufacturing and selling products are eager to pass on expenses incurred in development, production, sales and supply to the customer as soon as possible. Whether customers are able to recover their costs is a question that is only considered relevant when it comes to the customer making repeat purchases, in other words it only becomes relevant at some point in the future.

What are the important features of a subscription?

It all boils down to a lasting customer relationship. This undoubtedly develops for services relating to the product, but not for the value of the product itself. 

A product-centric focus was the perfect approach for the analog world and shaped the industrial era for over 100 years because it was very difficult to quantify how the product was used and the associated added value for the customer.

In today’s digital economy, however, this approach is outdated as data is available on how products are being used and new business models are shifting the focus away from the value of the product itself and towards the usage value. We now aim to adopt this approach at Heidelberg as the leading supplier on the print shop market.

What are the advantages of focusing on the benefits to the customer and the disadvantages of focusing on the product?

As I’ve said, suppliers in the digital age can use platforms to gather, profile and analyze data on all participants with the aim of continuously and sustainably increasing customer benefits and thus instilling valuable, long-lasting customer loyalty. All processes must therefore focus on this and remain transparent for all participants in real time. If companies focus on the product, they can’t work out in any great detail or very quickly what it is their customers do with the product, when and how. Incidentally, that is a trend that affects many areas of professional and personal life…

… can you give a few examples?

It starts with reading a book or magazine, or when customers switch production equipment on or off, or why they are in the car and where they’re going. Manufacturers/suppliers usually know nothing about how their products are being used. As a result, they have to carry out costly questionnaires and analyses to anticipate how the products are being used and implement laborious improvements in long cycles.

During the analog era, innovations were therefore subject to protracted innovation cycles that were often staggered due to the risks involved. This led to analog companies spending a disproportionately large amount of time on optimizing internal value creation. It is clear that during this era the price of a product did not reflect how the customer used it but rather covered material and production costs.

 

A milestone on the road to the digital transformation and finally implementing the subscription program. A YouTube video of Dr. Ulrich Hermann discussing the market launch of the Heidelberg Assistant in December 2017.

 


 

The key to success

How can the focus be switched to customer benefits?

If we consider customer benefits to be the cornerstone of a company’s business operations, we end up with completely different approaches. Companies want to know what customers are paying for when using the products they have provided. This is exactly what disruptive business models in the digital world are based on. Usage patterns serve as the measure of all things – supported by the user experience and the customer journey.

Have companies in the print industry grasped this point? After all, nearly everyone nowadays is talking about customer orientation.

Technology suppliers often do not fully grasp that customer orientation, as a prerequisite to focusing on customer benefits, itself requires a comprehensive organizational transformation. Everything changes – from the mindset and culture right through to product creation. The ability to digitally measure the usage of products and services is key to creating added value. All business activities must pursue this aim.

Analyzing valid, long-term data collected from installed machinery and systems helps develop benchmarks with reference groups, which in turn enables the derivation of target figures and reference variables for optimum usage. We have been collecting such data at Heidelberg since the introduction of Remote Service technology back in 2004 and it has formed the basis for introducing Heidelberg Subscription.

With regard to the print industry, does this mean that it is not enough to simply introduce digital processes into print product manufacturing?

Exactly. In the digital economy, competition isn’t all about the product – the main focus is on developing the relevant user experience. I like to show a picture that presents the bustling streets of Manhattan as the heart of New York City. Some ten years ago, the streets were still filled with yellow cabs. Today, it’s dark sedans.

The product in this example is the same, just black and not yellow. It is a vehicle with a driver and passenger – and from the outside it is not immediately recognizable as a digital product. The difference, however, lies in the user experience. It is much easier to order, select, pay for and travel in a taxi with Uber and to influence the quality of the business model by writing a review.

Passengers feel like they are being taken seriously – as a business partner rather than a prisoner behind a plexiglass pane, if you like. It is no longer just about the service or product portfolio, but rather the customer journey and a new, intelligent way of using the product.

What does this mean in real terms for Heidelberg and its customers?

In our line of work, the subscription economy offers the opportunity to think about how we need to fundamentally change our business not just by selling machinery and services, i.e. billing for the product value, but by developing new models that assess the usage and the resulting positive effects.

 

This film on Heidelberg Subscription shows how Heidelberg is going down new paths in marketing, too.

 


 

How it works

What is the concept behind Heidelberg Subscription?

More than a year has passed since we began the transformation. We initially asked ourselves the following questions. What offers the biggest profit potential for our customers? Cost-effective printing capacity or optimum utilization? If our customers only derive added value from maximum machine utilization – in other words from optimized utilization of a coordinated combination of numerous individual products such as printing presses, consumables, software and services – why shouldn’t they actually pay us for this added value rather than for the individual components?

How did you go about answering these key questions?

A team of people with backgrounds in a wide range of disciplines such as finance, services, product development, sales and marketing / product marketing were tasked with developing a business model in which Heidelberg would not sell individual products to the customer, but rather offer the use of an end-to-end system that has been optimized for the specific needs of that customer. As early as December 2017, we concluded our first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. More contracts are in place, and interest in the market is continuing to grow significantly.

Aren’t print shops skeptical? Many are still coming to terms with click-charge models, which are now used as standard in digital printing.

There is a disadvantage to the click-charge models commonly found on the market. They reflect the market prices of digital printing press suppliers and are not based on the customer’s actual cost per printed page for offset printing. There are also no benchmarks for productivity targets etc. In our model, we bill per printed page using the ‘impression charge’.

What is an ‘impression charge’? 

The price per page reflects the potential of increased utilization during the contract period. However, the customer has to have a successful business model that allows for sustainable growth. Our subscription model is quite simply a genuine performance partnership. If Heidelberg fails to boost productivity during the contract period, neither the customer or we can fully satisfy margin targets. That is the difference to click-charge models.

The normal click charges for digital printing are based on the costs incurred by the digital press manufacturer and its profit expectations, not on the comparative costs for the customer. They represent a product-based pricing that the customer, the print shop, cannot control and that does not reflect their actual cost structure. Digital printing is therefore not a digital business model.

Added to this is the fact that if utilization fluctuates or is insufficient, click charges can quickly have disastrous effects.

So what is key for developing billing models based on customer needs?

Print shops want to be able to manage their costs themselves. And with good reason, as for many centuries printing was a skilled trade with humans controlling the quality of the work. Only recently has the business started to be industrialized following the automation of production processes with the help of standards. For a craftsman, what’s important is focusing on customer proximity and creating a bespoke end product with a special touch. Accordingly, print results sometimes varied dramatically in terms of quality and price.

 

An introductory explanation on Heidelberg Subscription.

 


 

What are the benefits?

What does industrial production do differently to craftsmen?

Industrial production based on standards creates results that are largely consistent. Only the level of automation creates differences in production, and defines the print outcome and the operating result.

To stand out, print shops must therefore make substantial investments in their own, increasingly digital customer relationships. Digital marketing, an online presence and digitizing the process of ordering best-selling products are becoming very important. Investing in the pressroom may be an age-old tradition but it opens up few opportunities to stand out. It also distracts from the actual job of a printing company in the digital age – namely to attract customers. With this in mind, switching to a subscription model is an easy and entirely logical decision.

What does results-based payment entail?

Our experienced performance-focused consultants conduct a comprehensive analysis of the print shop, reviewing costs for personnel, consumables, downtimes, plate changes, waste, depreciation, and much more. Once this thorough analysis has been completed, a unit page price can be determined that is specific to the relevant customer.

What’s more, we use the performance data we have gathered from more than ten thousand networked machines to establish reference variables. Thanks to this database we can make an offer to the customer to lower this price through a subscription contract because we know how to optimize their operations.

What criteria apply for the subscription?  

Heidelberg Subscription is based on the following considerations/criteria:

  1. Customers must demonstrate growth potential in terms of overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). For most customers, this averages between 30 % and 40 %.
  2. Concentrating on product innovations and customer acquisitions, customers must aim to significantly boost order volumes.

Suitable customers are offered an attractive price based on the above considerations and on a specific expected OEE increase, e.g. from 35 % to 45 %. Using this model, we sell productivity gains and help customers to achieve and exceed their goals. Heidelberg is responsible for setting up the turnkey system accordingly. We promise customers that the price premium for our optimized and more productive turnkey system will not only be worth it, but will out-do their expectations.

How do potential customers react to this new approach?

Many customers are enthusiastic as they are not dealing with a supplier that demands money up front for better quality and even charges for servicing if a machine breaks down. Instead, Heidelberg does everything it can to exceed agreed performance targets and ensure quality matches customer expectations.

Is Heidelberg taking a risk by standing as guarantor for success? 

Yes and no. Yes because with the subscription contract, it is in our own interest to ensure machinery is running, software updates are carried out, the use of consumables is optimized, and to do everything we can to increase output. No because ultimately, we take care in choosing our subscription customers. Most importantly, customers must all have one thing in common – they need to concentrate on growth and product innovation on the market, and their business model must demonstrate the potential for further growth.

Analyzing such factors has always been important for us as a manufacturer. We want to grow alongside our successful customers. In the traditional business, this took a back seat provided the customer could pay for the equipment. What we are talking about here is an excellent, new dimension to the partnership. We are no longer looking at whether our machinery, services or materials are cheaper or more expensive than rival products. Everything is defined by the mutually agreed performance targets, using the calculated price per page as a guideline.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Another important aspect of the subscription model is based on autonomous printing following the Push to Stop principle presented at drupa 2016. – See our ValueCheck and case report.


 

Invoicing method

How do you determine the costs with a subscription contract?

That is tailored to the customer and their potential. For customers wishing to expand their business, for example, we might recommend our Speedmaster XL 106. Customers then make an upfront payment, which is only a small portion of the overall cost that would have been due if they had purchased the machinery. They also pay a fixed monthly charge based specifically on the price per page calculation of the agreed page volume that the customer aims to print and that is lower than their average page production. Additional impression charges are only incurred if the page volume exceeds the agreed targets.

Is the subscription tailored to the customer?

A fundamental and unique element to our offer is that we can customize the subscription in its entirety. For example, for companies unable to greatly increase productivity because excellent industrial systems already ensure a high OEE, we adjust the upfront payment and the fixed monthly charge accordingly. Alternatively, for customers with significant potential to increase performance and dynamic opportunities to increase order volume, we focus more on the variability of the payments.

With our subscription program, customers no longer need to worry about investing in their pressroom, making full use of available technology, or keeping systems up to date.

Why should customers tie themselves exclusively to Heidelberg?

If customers opt for the conventional model, they are dependent on a much bigger group of partners. Buying machinery takes up a large part of investment and often means being dependent on a bank. The supposed freedom that comes with pulling together consumables and optimizing the various features themselves comes with greater outlay, and all the separate relationships with numerous suppliers are diametrically opposed to the print shops’ profit targets…

…so that means the classic method of gathering lots of offers before purchasing brings its own problems? 

Everyone tries to pass on their costs. If we focus on the actual purpose of printing on paper, I believe all these dependencies are a much bigger issue than signing up to a long-term subscription contract with one manufacturer in which the profit interests of the manufacturer and customer are aligned for the first time. A Heidelberg Subscription contract runs for five years. We anticipate continuous OEE growth within that period. For example, if we increase page volume from 35 million pages per year to 55 million pages, this corresponds to OEE growth from approximately 35 % to 60 %. There is no need to explain what this means for the customer’s profits.

Is Heidelberg therefore financing the manufacturing costs for the production equipment?

The equipment belongs to Heidelberg and forms part of our balance sheet and/or our financing partners’ balance sheets. On the one hand, this fits in with the expectations of those customers who are undergoing digital transformation, i.e. the move toward an automated printing operation and digital customer relationships. Subscription customers always enjoy the highest possible level of automation without having to worry about technology updates, or financing new investments.

On the other hand, such customers also want to use digitization to bolster relationships with their own customers. Digital expertise helps to significantly improve go-to-market capacity across a broad spectrum.

 

subscribe1


 

How go-to-market is changing

Does this mean the subscription model also helps improve customers’ go-to-market capacity because it frees up resources at the print shop?

Every new print shop development until now has required enormous effort to ensure the technology is sound but also to secure prices that reflect more complex and thus more effective products. Placing a unilateral focus on production and ignoring customer value in digital customer relationships will come back to haunt even extremely successful modern printing companies.

Devoting resources to further develop the customer journey offered by the print shop and not getting bogged down by technical and administrative aspects is the best way of standing out from competitors and keeping ahead of the curve.

In other words, you are shifting your customers’ business focus?

Our high-growth customers are all excellent entrepreneurs who always focus on where the money flows so as to protect their investments. Customer orientation is greatly enhanced if we no longer force them to buy and maintain capital-intensive production equipment. Focusing completely on the customer as a core concept of the digital economy is always the best way forward for a prosperous business. That applies both to us and our customers.

With the subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of the financing. Do you anticipate any new challenges as a result?

A listed company with experience in customer financing such as Heidelberg cannot help but adopt new approaches in terms of financing. We even have a banking license. What works best for our investors is always cash-stable contracts with selected customers that have good potential for growth and are highly innovative.

That’s exactly what our subscription program ensures with its guaranteed monthly payments – particularly given that we can pool contracts and also trade through a financing partner. This is a much more attractive option for investors than having to negotiate contracts with individual print shops. Risks are balanced thanks to a diversified base of carefully assessed and chosen subscribers.

Last but not least, how quickly can you and do you want to increase market share with the subscription model?

There is very strong demand. But we are taking our time and signing contracts with selected ‘early adopters’. In this financial year, we aim to conclude ten contracts to gain experience and lay a solid foundation to gradually establish the offer across the market.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

As early as December 2017, Heidelberg concluded its first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. Photo: Heidelberg


 

Final conclusions

How would you summarize this development?

We live in exciting times with completely new opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers. The digital economy offers entirely new mindsets for these opportunities. Ensuring the transparent use of products and services in a digital business relationship enables us to concentrate on the real source of added value…

…and what does that ultimately mean?

The transparency we provide establishes fair business relationships between those involved, but also places great responsibility on all participants in the interest of preserving their freedom. This responsibility puts the spotlight on the values of the business partners. Heidelberg values have remained constant throughout our long industrial history and play a particularly important role in our digital strategy. We have reworded the responsibility assumed by Heidelberg in its role as a printing industry partner: Listen. Inspire. Deliver. Digital business models hardly get any better than that.

Thank you for agreeing to this interview and giving a detailed insight into the hidden complexities of mastering digital transformation.

 


 

#ValueCheck – Heidelberg Subscription as a new economic system

Why the subscription model from Heidelberg is not only a logical choice, but also essential for ensuring growth with innovative ideas

STATUS QUO

  • The print production volume (PPV) is stable at approximately 410 billion euros worldwide each year.
  • Despite this, the number of print shops and print units is decreasing due to improved press performance.
  • Even as print runs shrink, OEE (overall equipment effectiveness) can be increased through the automation of industrial-scale operations.
  • Today, growth rates can be more than doubled from 30 percent to 70 percent over ten years.
  • Given that the PPV cannot be doubled, there is an inevitable and considerable decrease in the number of print units that can be sold (up to 50 percent).
  • Heidelberg therefore has to generate added value elsewhere if it is to avoid becoming dependent on crowding out competitors or snatching market shares in order to survive in a shrinking machinery market.

MEASURES

  • Heidelberg is gaining attention as an “all-in system” thanks to its extensive print know-how and its servicing database, which has been established on the basis of predictive monitoring since 2004 and focuses on the continuous analysis and improvement of installed production equipment. More than 10,000 Heidelberg presses are currently subject to continuous analysis.
  • With its subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of everything to ensure maximum use is made of installed print shop technology.

EFFECTS

  • The risk associated with innovations is not only dramatically reduced, but also more widely spread.
  • Capital-intensive investments in production equipment no longer put a financial strain on print shops. Heidelberg supports customers, pooling and implementing investments with financing partners on good terms.
  • This has immediate positive effects on our industrial-scale customers, as increased flexibility and variability of usage provides immense freedom to concentrate on optimizing the marketing of enhanced performance and accelerating print shop growth.
  • The continuous increase in utilization results in improved profitability in the short, medium and long term.
  • The subscription program opens up linear and exponential growth opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Photo: Heidelberg

 

 

About Dr. Ulrich Hermann

Dr. Ulrich Hermann has been a member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG in his role as Chief Digital Officer since November 2016. Thanks to his proven expertise in the digital transformation of businesses, Hermann was made an honorary professor at Allensbach University, Constance, Germany, in August 2017.

Born 1966 in Cologne, he earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at RWTH in Aachen and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge, United States.

In 1996, he completed a doctorate in business economics at the University of St. Gallen, in 1998 he became the Managing Director of Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG, and in 2002 he was appointed Managing Director of Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation.

In 2005, he assumed the role of Chairman of the Management Board at Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding, later becoming a Member of the Divisional Executive Board for the Central European Region at Wolters Kluwer n.v. in 2010.

 


 

About Andreas Weber, Founder and CEO of Value Communication AG: Since more than 25 years Andreas Weber serves on an international level as a business communication analyst, influencer and transformer. His activities are dedicated to the ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ via presentations, management briefings, coachings, workshops, analysis&reports, strategic advice.

 


 

ValueCheck AutLay 01

Das Kölner Start-up AutLay.com schickt sich an, die Welt der Datenaufbereitung für den Druck zu revolutionieren. Bildcollage: Andreas Weber

Von Andreas Weber

Das Kölner Start-Up „AutLay.com” profitiert von jahrelanger, erfolgreicher Forschungsarbeit an der Universität zu Köln. Wirtschaftsinformatiker beschäftigen sich dort seit über einem Jahrzehnt mit Personalisierung und Individualisierung im Druck.

Herausgekommen ist eine neue, funktionsfähige Software-Architektur, die die automatisierte Erstellung von Layouts für druckfertige Dokumente in Echtzeit ermöglicht. Der Name AutLay steht für „Automatisches Layout“.

Seit Sommer 2017 fördern die Europäische Union im Rahmen des EFRE.NRW sowie die NRW-Landesregierung das Spitzenprojekt im Rahmen des Förderwettbewerbs START-UP-Hochschul-Ausgründungen. Bis November 2018 sollen finale Marktest abgeschlossen sein.


Innovationsansatz

Die Wissenschaftler sehen die Innovationsmöglichkeiten im Digitalzeitalter nicht nur auf rein digitale Entwicklungen begrenzt, sondern haben das größte Potenzial identifiziert in der Kombination von Print (via Digitaldruck) und eines integrierten Verfahrens durch neuentwickelte Software-as-a-Service-Lösungen zur vollautomatisierten Layout-Erstellung inkl. Druckdatenaufbereitung in Echtzeit.

Der Clou: Die Kölner kommen ohne sog. Templates aus, bislang das Nadelöhr der Pre-Media-Prozesse bei Print-Produktionen aller Art. Denn Templates sind starre Vorlagen, die als „digitale Schablonen“ bei Web-to-Print- resp. Web-to-Publishing Anwendungen bis dato notwendig sind und definieren fixe sowie variable, veränderbare Bestandteile, wie Texte oder Bilder.

Statische Templates werden bei AutLay.com durch Algorithmen ersetzt, die auf frei bestimmbaren Regelwerken basieren und vordefinierte Druckergebnisse in Echtzeit sicherstellen. Es werden dabei Metriken zur Quantifizierung von Ästhetik identifiziert, konsolidiert und entwickelt. Durch sogenannte Recommender-Systeme (automatisierte Empfehlungstechnologien) lassen sich die relevanten Inhalte für jeden Empfänger individuell festlegen.


ValueCheck AutLay 02

Der venezianische Buchdrucker und Verleger Aldus Manutius (1449-1515) gilt als wegweisender Typograph, der u. a. den Satzspiegel ‚erfand“‘ und damit die Basis für moderne Layout-Techniken und die Verwendung von Templates legte. Sein Druckerzeichen zeigt einen Anker und einen Delphin: Der Anker steht als Symbol für die Langsamkeit, der Delphin für die Geschwindigkeit. [Im Bild: Das Geburtshaus von Aldus in Bassiano]. — Der dynamische Erfinder-Geist von Aldus wie auch von Johannes Gutenberg verfügt auch heute noch über Strahlkraft und Leitbild-Funktion bei Innovatoren, die sich aber im Digitalzeitalter nicht mehr mit beweglichen Lettern, sondern mit variablen Daten beschäftigen. Bildcollage: Andreas Weber.

 


Innovationspotenzial

Weltweit werden pro Jahr über 3.000 Milliarden Euro aufgewendet, um für über 800 Milliarden Euro Drucksachen aller Art herstellen zu können. [Quelle: ValueTrendRadar Analysis: Print in seiner wirtschaftlichen Bedeutung.]

Erste Analysen zeigen, dass bei einzelnen Anwendungen wie z. B. für individualisierte Verkaufskataloge oder kurzfristige Verkaufsaktionen für Lagerbestände die üblichen Produktionsprozesses im Zeitaufwand um ein vielfaches reduziert und im Kostenaufwand nahezu halbiert werden können.

Den enormen Einsparungen durch den Einsatz von AutLay.com an Zeit und Geld stehen signifikante Vorteile beim Time-to-Market gegenüber, da schneller, unkomplizierter und Kundenbedürfnis-orientierter Waren und Leistungen aller Art angeboten und verkauft werden können.

 


 

 

Unter https://www.autlay.com/demo/ruck.html kann eine Demo Online angesehen werden.


 

Innovationsvorteile

Ein Umdenken wird möglich und praktikabel, um Kommunikation und Transaktion soweit es geht nahtlos zu vereinen und einfach, schnell sowie äußerst wirkungsvoll in der Praxis umzusetzen. Mit dem Effekt: Mass Marketing wandelt sich zu Customized Mass Marketing, denn grundsätzlich ist AutLay.com in seinem Leistungsvermögen beliebig skalierbar.

Ein wichtiger Zusatz-Effekt ist, dass Unternehmen erfolgreich den Kunden und seine spezifischen Bedürfnisse in den Mittelpunkt einer werthaltigen Kommunikation über alle Ebenen und Kanäle hinweg stellen können – dazu zählt insbesondere die Print-Kommunikation. Denn erstmals wird das in zahlreichen Systemen vorliegende Wissen über den Empfänger auch für die Print-Kommunikation nutzbar.


EFRE


 

Fazit

Mit diesem neuartigen Ansatz und dem engen Kontakt mit begleitender, unabhängiger wissenschaftlicher Forschung setzt sich AutLay.com deutlich von bestehenden Modellen der Software-Entwicklung zur Automatisierung von Medienkommunikation ab.

 


INFOKASTEN — Das Wichtigste im Überblick
(Ergebnisse aus aktuellen Expertengesprächen)

  1. Der generelle Nutzen von AutLay.com liegt nicht nur darin, Digitaldrucktechnik besser ausnutzen zu können, sondern darin, entscheidend zu helfen, Marketing-Prozesse und Print-Kommunikations-Abläufe durch Automatisieren qualitativ und quantitativ zu verbessern.

  2. Der ökonomische Nutzen liegt primär darin, dass Werbungtreibende mit ihren Dienstleistungspartnern entscheidend die unabänderlich steigenden Herstellungskosten im Druck wie auch im Versand (Logistik) kompensieren können. Und zwar indem durch AutLay.com die Premedia-Prozesse vereinfacht werden und sich dadurch Kosten- und Zeitaufwand drastisch reduzieren.

  3. Der funktionale Nutzen: AutLay.com nutzt alle relevanten Business Intelligence- und Big Data-Funktionalitäten, um Inhalte zweck- und zielgerichtet im Sinne des Targeting und der Mass Customization an die richtigen Zielpersonen per Print und damit nachhaltig wirkungsvoll auszuliefern.

  4. AutLay.com ist zukunftssicher aufgestellt und unterscheidet sich von anderen etablierten Lösungen durch sein variables SaaS-/Subscription-Modell: Es müssen keine hohen (Vor-)Investitionen in Soft- und Hardware getätigt werden, sondern es wird für die Nutzung bezahlt, die sofort Wirkung durch besseres Verkaufen zeigen kann. (Stichwort: Return-on-Invest quasi in Echtzeit!)

  5. AutLay.com verschafft Werbungtreibenden wie auch Agenturen mehr Freiraum für Kreativität, da man sich nicht mehr mit Technik/Layout/Design, sondern mit Kampagnen für Verkaufsaktionen beschäftigen kann.

  6. Last but not least: Die Wirkungsweise bewährter klassischer Direktmarketingmaßnahmen wird auf ein neues Level gehoben und durch Individualisierungsmöglichkeiten in Echtzeit erheblich aufgewertet.

 

#ops2018 David Schölgens AutLay

Eines der Highlights auf dem 6. Online Print Symposium 2018 in München: Die Präsentation zur Forschung rund um AutLay.com von Dr. David Schölgens.— Foto: #ops2018


Ausblick

Den bereits vorhandenen prototypischen Lösungen werden rasch weitere Beispiele im realen Praxistest für verschiedene Bereiche wie Handel oder Direktverkauf folgen. Denkbar sind zudem Kooperationen mit Print-Technologie-Herstellern.

AutLay.com ist als digitale Plattform durch sein SaaS-/Subscription-Preismodell sofort und unkompliziert nutzbar. 

Ein hoher Installations- oder Schulungsaufwand entsteht nicht. AutLay.com kann zudem je nach Anforderung individuell angepasst, modifiziert und erweitert werden.

 


 

 

2017-AutLayTeam

Das AutLay.com Projektteam: Dr. David Schölgens (links) und Sven Müller. 

 

Kurz-Übersicht zu Projekt & Team der Universität zu Köln

AutLay.com ist ein Ausgründungs-Projekt der Universität zu Köln. Im Mittelpunkt steht das vollautomatische und Template-freie Layouten druckfertiger Erzeugnisse. Mit diesem Ansatz ermöglichen die Kollegen Dr. David Schölgens und Sven Müller die individualisierte Kommunikation mit gedruckten Medienerzeugnissen. Gefördert wird das Projekt durch den Europäischen Fonds für regionale Entwicklung (EFRE) sowie Gelder des NRW-Haushaltes im Rahmen des Förderwettbewerbs START-UP-Hochschul-Ausgründungen. Professionell wird das Team unterstützt von ihrem Mentor Prof. Dr. Detlef Schoder und dem Coach Prof. Dr. Kai Thierhoff. Als Tutor steht der Analyst, Print- und Kommunikations-Experte Andreas Weber zur Verfügung.


 

Über den Autor: Über einen Zeitraum von mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Er hat zahlreiche Firmen mit begründet oder als Start-up betreut. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice. — Seit dem Jahr 2004 unterstützt er als Ratgeber und „Denk-Partner“ Prof. Dr. Detlef Schoder und sein Team bei der Innovationsentwicklung zu AutLay.com.

 


 

 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Foto: Heidelberg


„Im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen neuen, netzwerk- und plattform-basierten Ökonomiemodellen muss alles in Echtzeit passieren, transparent werden und sich der kontinuierlichen Steigerung des Kundennutzen unterordnen.“ — Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview und Analyse von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English Version

Erfolg im Print kommt nicht von alleine. Sondern nur durch neues Denken und Handeln! So kann man auf einen Nenner bringen, worum es Chief Digital Officer Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann, seit November 2016 Mitglied im Vorstand der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, bei seiner Arbeit geht. Im Exklusiv-Gespräch erklärt er die Prinzipien der ‚Subscription Economy‘, die bei Heidelberg nunmehr fest etabliert wird und aus dem Stand heraus Erfolge zeigen soll.

 


 

Hinweis: Im April 2018 erschienen weitere Neuigkeiten und Kommentare zu Heidelbergs Subscription Modell, zum Beispiel im Handelsblatt. “Der Verkauf von Druckmaschinen ist nicht mehr das Hauptgeschäft.”

Auch neue Kunden wurden vorgestellt, wie die Klampfer Group in Österreich oder die Lensing Druck Group in Deutschland.


 

Dies führt Heidelberg als Branchenprimus und seine vorwiegend industriell ausgerichteten Kunden auf das nächste Level der Transformation. Für die Print-Branche ist das ein Novum und eine Herausforderung zugleich, da die Leistungen von Druckereien erstmals individuell bewertet und abgerechnet werden. Die üblichen Abrechnungswege durch Verkauf von Equipment zu Festpreisen im Offsetdruck oder Click-Charge-Modelle im Digitaldruck werden durch Subscription überholt. Das bietet Vorteile.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info-Box: Was bedeutet ‚Subscription‘?

Die Subscription Economy korreliert mit dem fundamentalen Wandel eines auf Individualisierung ausgerichtetem Kauf- und Verbraucherverhalten im B2C wie immer stärker auch im B2B. Langfristige und flexible Kundenbeziehungen und der kontinuierliche Kundennutzen stehen im Fokus, nicht mehr der Erwerb und Besitz von Produkten. Die resultierenden technischen und organisatorischen Anforderungen sind hoch. In der Druckbranche sind solche Lösungen partiell schon bekannt durch singuläre Software-as-a-Service-Lösungen. Wichtige Parameter sind Automatisierung und Skalierbarkeit, komplexe Datenmodelle, veränderte Rechnungslegung bis hin zu Analytics. Von entscheidender Bedeutung ist es, kontinuierlich Aufschluss über die Kundenzufriedenheit und v.a. die Art und Weise der Nutzung von Produkten oder Services zu erhalten, da sie es Unternehmen erlauben, die Dienste individueller zu gestalten, um Wachstum für Lieferant und Kunde gleichermaßen zu ermöglichen. Studien belegen, dass in den USA als dem Mutterland der Digitalisierung die Subscription Economy schon weit entwickelt ist und in den letzten 10 Jahren bereits rund 800 Milliarden US-Dollar an Wertschöpfung erzielte. —aw


 

Worum es geht

Die Subskriptions-Ökonomie könnte auch in unserer Branche das große Thema werden — in den USA bereits wirtschaftlich extrem erfolgreich, bei uns bis dato noch kaum beachtet. Was ändert sich dadurch?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Der Begriff ‚Subscription‘ steht für ein neues Modell der Wertschöpfung durch konsequente Nutzen-Zentrierung. Es bedeutet primär das Ende der produktzentrischen Orientierung von Firmen, die ihre Wertschöpfung nicht am Nutzen des Kunden ausmacht, sondern aus dem Produktentstehungsprozess ableitet.

In dieser am Produkt und seiner Vermarktung ausgerichteten analogen Welt ist das Unternehmen bestrebt, so bald wie möglich den Aufwand, den sie für Entwicklung, Produktion, Vertrieb und Bereitstellung hatte, an die Kunden weiter zu berechnen. Ob die Kunden auf ihre Kosten kommen ist hier nur eine Frage, die für den Wiederhol-Kauf relevant ist. Also vertagt wird.

Worauf kommt es also bei ‚Subscription‘ speziell drauf an?

Es kommt auf eine dauerhafte Kundenbeziehung an; diese entsteht sicher für Service-Dienstleitungen „um das Produkt herum“, nicht aber für den eigentlichen Produktwert. Produktzentrierung passte bestens in die analoge Welt und prägte über 100 Jahre das Industriezeitalter, weil die Nutzung und die damit einhergehende Wertschöpfung beim Kunden eben nur schwer messbar waren.

In einer Digitalökonomie ist das nicht mehr zeitgemäß, da hier über die Nutzungsdaten verfügt und durch neue Geschäftsmodelle der Nutzwert, nicht der Produktwert in den Vordergrund gestellt wird. Dies wollen und können wir bei Heidelberg als erster Anbieter für Druckereien gezielt im Markt etablieren.

Worin liegen die Vorteile von Nutzen-Zentrierung bzw. die Nachteile der Produktzentrierung?

Wie gesagt, im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen Plattformen können Anbieter Daten aller Akteure sammeln, profilieren und analysieren mit dem Ziel, den Kundennutzen nachhaltig und dauerhaft zu erhöhen und damit werthaltige Loyalitäten beim Kunden zu schaffen. Folglich muss alles Handeln sich daran orientieren und für alle Beteiligten in Echtzeit transparent sein. Durch die Produktzentrierung geht verloren, umfassend und zeitnah zu wissen, was Kunden mit dem Produkt wann genau wie machen. Ein Momentum, das übrigens querbeet viele Arbeits- und Lebensbereiche betrifft…

… können Sie Beispiele nennen?

Es fängt beim Lesen eines Buches oder Magazins an, oder damit, wann Kunden Produktionsmittel an- und ausschalten, warum sie im Auto sitzen und wohin sie fahren. Der Hersteller/Lieferant weiß darüber in der Regel nichts über die Produktverwendung. Die Folge ist, dass mit hohem Aufwand durch Befragungen und Analysen eine Antizipation der Nutzung erfolgen muss, um in langen Zyklen recht mühselig Verbesserungen vornehmen zu können.

Innovationen unterlagen in der analogen Zeit daher längeren und wegen der damit verbundenen Risiken in der Regel schrittweisen Innovationszyklen, was zur Folge hatte, dass der Anteil der Zeit, mit der sich analoge Firmen um die Optimierung der internen Wertschöpfung bemühen, unverhältnismäßig hoch war. Es ist nur offensichtlich, dass in dieser Welt auch der Preis nicht die Nutzung des Produktes durch den Kunden reflektiert, sondern eher der Deckung von Material und Produktionsaufwand.

 

 

 

 

Ein Meilenstein auf dem Weg, die digitale Transformation und letztlich das Subscription-Programm realisieren zu können: Die Markteinführung des Heidelberg Assistant im Dezember 2017, die Dr. Ulrich Hermann persönlich per Youtube-Video erläuterte.

 


 

Worauf es ankommt

Wie geht die Umstellung auf Nutzen-Orientierung von statten?

Wenn man den Aspekt rund um das Nutzen-Stiften als Kerngedanken ins Zentrum der Betriebswirtschaft einer Firma stellt, kommt man zu völlig anderen Vorgehensweisen. Man will wissen, wofür zahlt mein Kunde, während er die zur Verfügung gestellten Produkte nutzt. Disruptive Geschäftsmodelle der digitalen Welt bauen exakt darauf auf: Das Nutzungsverhalten wird zum Maß aller Dinge — getragen durch die User Experience und die Customer Journey.

Wird das in der Print-Branche auch schon richtig verstanden? Schließlich reden fast alle mittlerweile über Kundenorientierung.

Unterschätzt wird von Technik-Anbieter-Seite aus oftmals, dass allein die Kundenzentrierung als Vorbedingung der Nutzen-Orientierung eine umfassende Transformation der Organisation erfordert. Von der Denkweise und Kultur bis zur Produktentstehung, alles verändert sich. Die digitale Messbarkeit der Nutzung von Produkten und Services rückt in den Mittelpunkt der Wertschöpfung. Sämtliche Geschäftsaktivitäten müssen darauf abgestimmt sein.

Valide, langfristig erhobene Datenanalysen bei installierten Maschinen und Systemen helfen dabei Benchmarks mit Vergleichsgruppen aufzubauen, damit Ziel- und Führungsgrößen für die optimale Nutzung abzuleiten. Solche Daten erheben wir bei Heidelberg seit der Einführung der Remote Service-Technologie bereits seit dem Jahr 2004 und sind für uns die Basis für die Einführung von Subscription.

Bezogen auf die Print-Industrie heißt das: Es genügt also nicht, digitale Prozesse und Verfahren nur in die Fertigung von Print-Produkten einfließen zu lassen?

Genau. In der digitalen Ökonomie dreht sich der Wettbewerb nicht ums Produkt, sondern vor allem um die Ausgestaltung des relevanten Nutzererlebnisses — im neudeutschen eben „User-Experience“ genannt. Ich zeige gerne ein Bild, dass das Straßengeschehen von Manhattan als Herzstück von New York City zeigt. Bis vor 10 Jahren war es noch geprägt von den Taxis, den Yellow Cabs; heute von dunklen Limousinen.

Das eigentliche Produkt ist vergleichbar, nur eben schwarz und nicht gelb: Ein Auto mit Fahrer und Fahrgast eben — und von außen betrachtet nicht auf Anhieb als digitales Produkt erkennbar. Der Unterschied liegt aber im Nutzen-Erlebnis: Es ist viel einfacher mit Uber ein Taxi zu bestellen, auszuwählen, zu bezahlen, zu fahren und mit Bewertungen die Qualität des Geschäftsmodelles selbst zu beeinflussen.

Als Fahrgast fühlt man sich ernstgenommen, irgendwie als Partner, nicht als Gefangener hinter einer Plexiglasscheibe. Es geht also nicht mehr um das reine Leistungs- oder Produktangebot, sondern um die Customer Journey und die neue, smarte Art der Produktnutzung.

Was heißt das konkret, bezogen auf Heidelberg und seine Kunden?

Die Subscription-Economy bietet in unserem Kontext die Chance, darüber nachzudenken, wie wir unser Geschäft grundlegend verändern müssen. Indem wir nicht mehr nur Maschinen und Services verkaufen, also den Produktwert abrechnen, sondern neue Modelle finden, die Nutzung und die daraus resultierenden positiven Effekte zu bewerten.

 

 

Auch im Marketing geht Heidelberg neue Wege. Wie der Image-Film zu Heidelberg Subscription zeigt.

 


 

Wie es funktioniert

Wie muss man sich Subscription bei Heidelberg im Detail vorstellen?

Vor über einem Jahr haben wir einen Veränderungs-Prozess angestoßen. Wir haben uns zuerst folgende Fragen gestellt. Worin liegt das größte Gewinnpotential für unseren Kunden? Aus dem Besitz von günstiger Druckkapazität oder aus seiner optimalen Auslastung? Wenn unsere Kunden erst Mehrwert aus der maximalen Maschinenauslastung, oder anders ausgedrückt: der optimierten Nutzung einer abgestimmten Kombination aus einer Vielzahl von Einzelprodukten, wie Maschine, Verbrauchsgüter, Service und Software ziehen, warum soll der Kunde uns nicht genau erst für diesen Mehrwert zahlen und nicht bereits schon für die Einzelkomponenten?

Und wie sie sind Sie vorgegangen, um auf diese zentralen Fragen Antworten zu finden?

Aus verschiedensten Disziplinen wie Finanzierung, Service, Produktentwicklung, Vertrieb, Marketing/Produktmarketing wurde ein Team gebildet, um ein Geschäftsmodell zu finden, in dem Heidelberg nicht die Einzelprodukte dem Kunden verkauft, sondern die Nutzung eines auf den individuellen Kunden optimierten Gesamtsystems anbietet. — Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnten wir mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Weitere Abschlüsse sind in trockenen Tüchern. Und das Interesse im Markt wächst erheblich weiter.

Sind Druckereien da nicht skeptisch? Viele Drucker hadern ja auch mit den im Digitaldruck zwangsläufig üblichen Click-Charge-Modellen.

Die im Markt üblichen Click-Charge-Modelle haben einen Nachteil: Sie reflektieren die Marktpreise der Anbieter von Digitaldruckmaschinen und orientieren sich eben nicht an den wirklichen Kosten pro gedruckte Seite des Kunden seiner laufenden Offset-Printproduktion. Es gibt auch keine Benchmarks für Produktivitätsziele, und so weiter. In unserem Modell rechnen wir ebenfalls pro gedruckte Seite mit der sogenannten „Impression Charge“ ab.

Was ist unter „Impression Charge“ zu verstehen? 

Dieser Preis pro Seite reflektiert das Potential einer verbesserten Auslastung innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit, setzt aber voraus, dass der Kunde ein erfolgreiches Geschäftsmodell hat, mit dem er nachhaltig wächst. Subscription in unserem Angebot ist eben eine echte Performance-Partnerschaft. Sollte Heidelberg innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit die Potentiale nicht heben, dann können sowohl der Kunde als auch wir nicht die volle Margenerwartung realisieren. Das ist der Unterschied zur Click Charge.

Die üblichen Digitaldruck-Click-Charges orientieren sich an den Kosten der Digitaldruckmaschinen-Hersteller und ihrer Gewinnerwartung, nicht an den Vergleichskosten des Kunden. Sie stellen ein produktorientiertes Pricing dar, das vom Kunden, der Druckerei, nicht kontrolliert werden kann und auch nicht seine tatsächliche Kostenstruktur reflektiert. Digitaldruck ist daher kein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Hinzu kommt: Ist die Auslastung schwankend oder nicht ausreichend vorhanden, werden Click-Charges schnell ruinös.

Was ist demnach entscheidend, um Kosten-Abrechnungs-Modelle kundengerecht zu gestalten?

Druckereien wollen ihre Kosten selbstbestimmt managen können. Aus gutem Grund. Der Druckbetrieb war Jahrhunderte lang stets handwerklich orientiert, mit vom Menschen kontrollierter Qualität; erst in jüngster Zeit wurde begonnen, das Geschäft durch die Automatisierung von Produktionsprozessen mithilfe von Standards zu industrialisieren. Beim Handwerker stehen das Ergebnis einer individuellen Leistung mit seiner besonderen Note sowie die Kundennähe im Fokus. Entsprechend waren Druckergebnisse bisweilen komplett unterschiedlich in Qualität und Preis.

 

 

 

Ein erstes Erklärung-Video zu Heidelberg Subscription (in englischer Sprache).

 


 

Was es bringt

Was wir durch die industrielle Produktion anders als bei ‚Handwerk‘?

Durch die industrielle Produktion auf Basis von Standards sind Ergebnisse weitgehend gleich. Nur der Grad der Automatisierung schafft noch Unterschiede durch die Produktion und definiert das drucktechnische sowie das betriebswirtschaftliche Ergebnis.

Um ihre Leistung differenzieren zu können, müssen Druckereien daher erheblich in die eigene, zunehmend digitale Kundenbeziehung investieren. Digitales Marketing, Internetpräsenz und die Digitalisierung der Bestellwege der Print-Besteller wird extrem wichtig. Das eigene Investment in den Drucksaal mag alter Tradition folgen, schafft aber kaum noch Möglichkeiten zu differenzieren und lenkt von der eigentlichen Aufgabe eines Druckunternehmers in der digitalen Zeit ab: nämlich Kunden zu gewinnen. Vor diesem Hintergrund fällt eine Umorientierung hin zu Subscription nicht nur leicht, sondern macht absolut Sinn.

Wie definiert sich eine Ergebnis-orientierte Bezahlung?

Durch eine von uns durchgeführte, umfassende Analyse des Druckbetriebes werden alle Kosten bewertet: für Personal, Verbrauchsmaterialien, Stillstandszeiten, Plattenwechsel, Makulatur, Abschreibungen und vieles mehr. Wir nutzen dazu unsere erfahrenen, auf die Performance orientierten Consultants. Am Ende lässt sich aus dieser Gesamtsicht ein für jeweiligen Betrieb tatsächlicher Herstellungs-Seitenpreis ermitteln.

Zudem nutzen wir unsere Performance Daten aus mehr als zehntausend angeschlossenen Maschinen, um Führungsgrößen zu entwickeln. Auf dieser Datenbasis können wir dann dem Kunden ein Angebot machen, diesen Preis im Rahmen eines Subskriptionsvertrages zu unterbieten, weil wir wissen, wie sich dieser Betrieb weiter optimieren lässt.

Welche Kriterien greifen für die Subscription?  

Subscription fußt bei uns auf Basis folgender Überlegung bzw. Maßgabe:

  1. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss ein Steigerungspotential seiner OEE [Overall Equipment Effectiveness] haben, die bei den allermeisten der Kunden im Schnitt zwischen 30 % und 40 % liegt.
  2. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss signifikantes Wachstum in seinen Auftragsvolumen anstreben, weil er sich auf Produkt-Innovationen und auf Kundenakquisition konzentriert.

Kunden, die in Betracht kommen, bieten wir einen attraktiveren Preis auf Basis von Überlegungen sowie der Vorwegnahme, die OEE um definierte Werte zu steigern, beispielsweise also von 35 % auf 45 %. Wir verkaufen dadurch Produktivitätsvorteile und helfen dem Kunden dabei, diese zu erreichen bzw. zu übertreffen. Es liegt in der Verantwortung von Heidelberg, das Gesamtsystem dementsprechend einzurichten.. Wir übernehmen damit die Garantie, dass sich unser Preis-Premium für das bessere und produktivere Gesamtsystem nicht nur rechnet, sondern vom Kunden geschlagen wird.

Wie reagieren interessierte Kunden auf diesen neuen Ansatz?

Viele Kunden sind begeistert. Denn sie haben es dann mit Heidelberg als einem Lieferanten zu tun, der nicht am Anfang sein Geld für höhere Qualität verlangt und, wenn die Maschine steht, sogar noch Servicekosten berechnet, sondern der alles dafür tut, dass die Performance die vereinbarte Zielmarke übersteigt und sich die Qualität für den Kunden rechnet!

Heidelberg geht also ins Risiko bzw. wird Erfolgsgarant? 

Ja und nein. Ja, denn im Subscriptionsvertrag mit dem Kunden ist es Heidelbergs eigenes Interesse, dass die Maschine läuft, dass Software-Updates durchgeführt werden, der Einsatz von Verbrauchsmaterialien optimiert wird, und alles zu tun, um Leistungssteigerungen zu realisieren. Nein, da wir unsere Subscriptionskunden schließlich als Partner sorgfältig auswählen. Die Kunden müssen vor allem eines gemeinsam haben: Ihr unternehmerischer Fokus gilt dem Wachstum und der Produktinnovation im Markt und ihr Geschäftsmodell zeigt, dass Sie weiter wachsen können.

Diese Analyse war ja schon immer wichtig für uns als Hersteller. So wollen wir ja mit den erfolgreichen Kunden mitwachsen. Das stand aber im traditionellen Geschäft nicht im Vordergrund, sofern der Kunde die Maschine bezahlen kann! Wir sprechen hier über eine exzellente, neue Dimension der Partnerschaft. Wir diskutieren dabei nicht mehr, ob unsere Maschinen, Services oder Materialien günstiger oder teurer sind als beim Wettbewerb. Alles regelt sich über die gemeinsam festgelegten Performance-Ziele mit den errechneten Seitenpreisen als Orientierung.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Ein weiteres wichtiges Element für Subscription basiert auf autonomem Drucken gemäß dem auf der drupa 2016 vorgestellten Push-to-Stop-Prinzip. — Siehe unseren ValueCheck und Praxisbericht.


 

Wie es sich rechnet

Wie legen Sie die Kosten mittels eines Subskriptions-Vertrags fest?

Das erfolgt individuell je nach Kunde und seinen Möglichkeiten. Beispielsweise kommt für den Kunden, der sein Geschäft erweitern möchte, eine Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 in Betracht. Der Kunde leistet dann eine Upfront-Zahlung, die nur einen kleineren Teil des Gesamtwertes ausmacht, den er bei Kauf hätte zahlen müssen, zzgl. eines monatlichen Fix-Betrages, der sich spezifisch nach der Seitenpreis-Berechnung des vereinbarten Seitenvolumens, das gedruckt werden soll und das unter der durchschnittlichen Seitenproduktion des Kunden liegt, ergibt. Erst wenn das Seitenvolumen die vereinbarte Zielmarke überschreitet, werden zusätzliche Impression-Charges berechnet.

Passt sich das Subscription-Angebot auf die Kunden an?

Wesentlich und einzigartig ist, dass wir das Ganze äußerst individuell gestalten können. Beispielsweise wird bei einem Betrieb, der wenig Produktivitätssteigerung erwarten kann, weil seine OEE aufgrund exzellenter industrieller Fertigkeit sowieso schon hoch ist, die Upfront-Zahlung entsprechend justiert, ebenso wie der monatliche Fix-Betrag, der zu zahlen ist. Oder: Bei Kunden mit hohen Performance-Steigerungspotenzialen und dynamischen Steigerungs-Möglichkeiten beim Auftragseingang legen wir mehr Fokus auf die Variabilität der Zahlungen.

Unser Subscription-Programm befreit den Kunden von der Investitionslast im Drucksaal und der Problematik, die ihm zur Verfügung stehende Technik voll zu nutzen und selbst auf Stand zu halten.

Warum sollen sich Kunden ausschließlich an Heidelberg binden?

Wenn sich ein Kunde für das konventionelle Modell entscheidet, steht er in weit aus komplexeren Abhängigkeiten. Mit dem Kauf der Maschine legt er sich für einen großen Teil des Investments fest und steht häufig in Abhängigkeit von der Bank. Der vermeintlichen Freiheit, Verbrauchsgüter selbst zusammenzustellen und die insgesamt angebotenen Features selbst zu optimieren, stehen immer höhere Aufwände gegenüber und die gesamten Einzelbeziehungen mit den Lieferanten stehen den Gewinnzielen des Druckbetriebes diametral entgegen…

… das heisst doch, dass der klassische Weg der Anschaffung im Konzert mit vielen Anbieten Probleme bringt, oder? 

Jeder versucht, die Kosten auf den anderen abzuwälzen. Ich halte hier die Abhängigkeiten mit Blick auf den eigentlichen Zweck, ein Papier zu bedrucken, in Summe für erheblich grösser als einen langfristigen Subscriptions-Vertrag mit einem Hersteller einzugehen, in dem erstmalig Gewinninteressen gleichgeschaltet sind. Ein Heidelberg Subscription-Vertrag wird auf eine Laufzeit von fünf Jahren ausgelegt. Innerhalb der Laufzeit gehen wir stets immer von Zuwächsen bei der OEE aus. Zum Beispiel: Steigern wir das Seitenvolumen von 35 Mio. Seiten pro Jahr auf 55 Mio., entspricht das einem OEE-Zuwachs von rund 35 % auf 60%. Was das für den Gewinn des Kunden bedeutet, erschließt sich von selbst.

Heidelberg übernimmt damit die Finanzierung der Herstellkosten für die Produktionsmittel?

Das Equipment gehört Heidelberg und ist in unserer Bilanz bzw. der unserer Finanzierungspartner enthalten. Das deckt sich mit den Vorstellungen derjenigen Kunden von uns, die zum einen ihrerseits die digitale Transformation, sprich die Wende zur automatisierten Druckfabrik und zur digitalen Kundenbeziehung, bewerkstelligen. Unser Subscription-Modell beinhaltet, stets den höchst erreichbaren Automatisierungsgrad beizubehalten, ohne sich um Technik-Updates, Neuinvestitionen und deren Finanzierung kümmern zu müssen.

Zum anderen wollen diese Kunden ihre Kundenbeziehungen ebenfalls durch die Digitalisierung stärken. Die Go-to-Market-Befähigung wird durch digitale Kompetenzen auf breiter Ebene extrem aufgewertet.

 

subscribe1


 

Wie sich das Go-to-Market verändert

Das heißt, ein wesentlicher ‚Neben’-Effekt der Subscription liegt darin, die Go-to-Market-Befähigung ihrer Kunden zu beflügeln, weil Ressourcen bei Druckereien frei werden?

Jede Neuerung, die Druckereien vornehmen, erfordert bis dato ungeheure Anstrengungen. Nicht nur, um dies technisch solide zu gestalten, sondern vor allem um Preise durchzusetzen, wenn Produkte aufwändiger und damit noch wirkungsvoller werden sollen. Die einseitige Konzentration des Druckbetriebes auf die Produktion und die Vernachlässigung des Kundenwertes in einer digitalen Kundenbeziehung rächt sich auch für die heute noch extrem erfolgreichen Betriebe.

Seine Ressourcen auf die  Weiterentwicklung der vom Druckbetrieb dargebotenen Customer Journey zu konzentrieren und sich nicht mehr im Technischen oder Administrativen zu verlieren, ist der beste Weg, immer auf der Höhe der Zeit sein zu können, um sich Wettbewerbsvorteile zu sichern.

Mit anderen Worten, Sie verschieben also den Geschäftsfokus Ihrer Kunden?

Unsere wachstumsstarken Kunden sind alles exzellente Unternehmer, deren Fokus immer dort ist, wo Geld fließt, um ihre Investitionen zu schützen. Wenn wir sie nicht mehr zwingen, sich vor allem mit dem Kauf und der Pflege von kapitalintensiven Produktionsmitteln beschäftigen zu müssen, profitiert die Kundenorientierung ganz erheblich. Der absolute Kundenfokus als Kernelement der digitalen Ökonomie ist immer das beste Prinzip für prosperierendes Geschäft. Das gilt für uns genauso wie für unsere Kunden.

Bei Subscription übernimmt Heidelberg die Finanzierung. Stellt Sie das vor neue, schwierige Herausforderungen?

Ein börsennotiertes und in Fragen der Kundenfinanzierung erfahrenes Unternehmen wie Heidelberg ist prädestiniert für neue Wege bei der Finanzierung. Wir haben sogar eine Banklizenz. Das Beste für unsere Investoren sind immer Cash-stabile Verträge mit ausgewählten, wachstumsfähigen und innovationsstarken Kunden.

Dies stellen wir beim Subscription-Programm mit seinen garantierten monatlichen Zahlungen sicher. Zumal wir die Verträge bündeln und außerhalb über einen Finanzpartner „traden“ können. Das ist für Geldgeber viel attraktiver als mit einzelnen Druckbetreiben Abschlüsse verhandeln zu müssen. Wir bieten durch die gründliche Selektion und Bewertung ein ausgeglichenes Risiko durch eine breitgestreute Subskriptionsbasis.

Zu guter letzt: Wie schnell wollen und können Sie mit Subscription im Markt wachsen?

Die Nachfrage ist sehr groß. Wir lassen uns aber Zeit, nehmen ausgewählte ‚Early Adopters‘ unter Vertrag. Dieses Geschäftsjahr wollen wir mit 10 Verträgen Erfahrungen sammeln und ein solides Fundament legen, um das Angebot allmählich breit im Markt zu verankern.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnte Heidelberg mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Foto: Heidelberg


 

Auf den Punkt gebracht

Wie lautet Ihr Fazit?

Wir leben in einer spannenden Zeit mit völlig neuen Chancen für uns und unsere Kunden. Die Digitalökonomie bietet hierfür völlig neue Denkmuster. Die Transparenz der Nutzung des Leistungsangebotes in der digitalen Geschäftsbeziehung führt zur Konzentration auf das wirklich Wertschöpfende…

… und das heisst letztlich?

Die Transparenz, die wir ermöglichen, führt zu einer fairen Geschäftsbeziehung der Akteure —  aber verlangt auch nach einer hohen Verantwortung aller Akteure, letztlich zum Schutz ihrer Freiheiten. Mit der Verantwortung rückt das Wertesystem der Geschäftspartner mehr in den Vordergrund. In unserer digitalen Strategie nimmt das Wertesystem von Heidelberg eine besonders starke Rolle ein und ist die eigentliche Konstante in unserer langen Industriegeschichte. Wir haben diese Verantwortung für Heidelberg als Partner der Druckindustrie neu formuliert mit: Zuhören, Inspirieren und Liefern. Es gibt fast keine bessere Wertebasis für ein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Danke für das Gespräch, das sehr aufschlussreich ist und zeigt, welche Komplexität dahinter steckt, den digitalen Wandel zu meistern.

 


Nachtrag

Print ist SPITZE! Und führend bei Industrie 4.0. — Sehenswerter Filmbeitrag vom #swr im Rahmen der Sendereihe “Made in Südwest” vom 26.4.2018 über Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG beleuchtet eindrücklich, was in der Traditionsbranche Drucken heute auf Welt-Niveau möglich ist. — “Einfach mal die Augen aufmachen und hingucken! Es wird weiter gedruckt werden.” Markus Zielbauer, Produktionsmeister bei Heidelberg, Halle 6 (Speedmaster) 

https://youtu.be/l-si95E5seQ


#ValueCheck: Heidelberg Subscription als neues Ökonomie-System

Warum das Subskriptions-Modell von Heidelberg nicht nur Sinn macht sondern eine kluge Notwendigkeit darstellt, um Wachstum durch Innovation sicherzustellen

STATUS QUO

  • Das Print-Produktions-Volumen (PPV) bleibt stabil mit rund 410 Milliarden Euro weltweit pro Jahr.
  • Die Zahl der Druckereien nimmt aber ab, ebenso wie die Zahl der Druckwerke in den Betrieben („Print-Units“) aufgrund von besseren Maschinenleistungen.
  • Die OEE (Overall-Equipment-Effectiveness) kann selbst bei kleiner werdenden Druckauflagenhöhen durch Automatisierung bei industriell ausgerichteten Betrieben gesteigert werden.
  • Steigerungsraten können von heute 30% auf 70% in 10 Jahren mehr als verdoppelt werden
  • Da sich das PPV nicht verdoppeln wird, sinkt zwangsläufig die Zahl der verkaufbaren Druckwerke deutlich (bis zu 50%).
  • Die Wertschöpfung muss sich also bei Heidelberg verlagern, um nicht in einem kleiner werdenden Maschinenmarkt nur noch durch Verdrängung oder durch Marktanteile-Abjagen vom Wettbewerb überlebensfähig zu sein.

MASSNAHMEN

  • In den Fokus rückt Heidelberg als ‚Gesamtsystem‘ mit seiner umfassenden Print-Kompetenz und der seit 2004 durch Predictive Monitoring für den Service aufgebauten Datenbasis bezüglich der konstanten Analyse und Verbesserung der installierten Produktionsmittel. Derzeit über zehntausend Heidelberg-Druckmaschinen werden konstant analysiert.
  • Heidelberg kümmert sich beim Subskriptionsmodell vollständig um die optimale Nutzung der installierten Technik in der Druckerei.

EFFEKTE

  • Das Risiko für Innovationen wird nicht nur drastisch gesenkt, sondern verteilt.
  • Kapitalintensive Investitionen in Produktionsmittel belasten nicht mehr die Bilanzen der Druckereien, sondern die Kunden werden von Heidelberg unterstützt bzw. die Investitionen gebündelt zu guten Konditionen mit Finanzpartnern umgesetzt.
  • Dies hat unmittelbar positive Auswirkungen auf industriell ausgerichtete Heidelberg-Kunden, da das Mehr an Flexibilität und die Nutzungsvariabilität enormen Freiraum bieten, um sich optimal auf die Vermarktung der gesteigerten Leistung zu fokussieren und das Wachstum der Druckerei zu beschleunigen.
  • In der konstanten Nutzungssteigerung liegt kurz-, mittel und langfristig die Steigerung der Profitabilität.
  • Durch das Subscription-Programm bieten sich für Heidelberg und seine Kunden nicht nur lineare, sondern exponentielle Wachstumsmöglichkeiten.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Foto: Heidelberg

 

Zur Person

Seit November 2016 ist Prof. h. c.  Dr. Ulrich Hermann Mitglied des Vorstands der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG und gleichzeitig Chief Digital Officer. Im August 2017 wurde er als ausgewiesener Experte im Bereich der digitalen Transformation von Unternehmen von der Allensbach Hochschule Konstanz zum Honorarprofessor berufen.

1966 in Köln geboren, studierte er an der RWTH, Aachen und am Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge U.S.A. und schloss als Diplom-Ingenieur Maschinenbau ab.

1996 erfolgte die Promotion an der Hochschule St. Gallen im Bereich Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 1998  wurde er zum Geschäftsführer Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG und 2002  zum Geschäftsführer Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation ernannt.

2005 übernahm er den Vorsitz der Geschäftsführung Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding und wurde 2010 Bereichsvorstand der Wolters Kluwer N. V. Region Central Europe.

 


 

Über den Autor: Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice.

 


 

 

ValueCheck Lufthansa 2018.001

Photos: Lufthansa

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

Note: As a teenager, I made my first flight experience with Lufthansa. That was great! Over the next 45 years, I have had some ‘Ups & Downs’ with the Kranich Airline (also a few years as a premium customer with Lufthansa Senator status). — I watch relevant news as an analyst always highly interested.

With a big bang, millions in advertising revenue and full of fervor, Lufthansa is re-branding itself. At the heart of this is an elaborate re-design – above all the crane as its symbol – which according to estimates has taken at least seven years to be fully implemented.

According to Group CEO Carsten Spohr, the new brand world is the icing on the cake of modernization, he says with pride and joy. It works. Experts are not tired of holding forth about all the design aspects of the new brand identity. [The newspaper HORIZONT provides an overview].

However, the news channel n-tv rightly noted, with the help of media expert Thomas Koch, that whether the redesign will actually bring in new customers and give the business wings is debatable. According to Koch, it’s the customer who decides on the performance [quality] of the offer. A redesigned logo as a trademark is more incidental. 

Lufthansa’s head of marketing, Alexander Schlaubitz, emphasizes that it is about more than that [or even about everything!] As his Group CEO has said, Lufthansa needs modernizing. For corporate marketing, this means doing away with anything which cannot be optimally digitized in order to do justice to the digital transformation and mobile communication, right down to the last pixel. [See interview by Fabian Wurm].

 


Kranich vorher nachher 58181-detail

Photo: The Lufthansa logo since 1990.


 

This was actually something that the godfather of the design, Otl Aicher, had his eye on at the start of the 1960s when he created the crane as the trademark as part of a comprehensive CI. But his demand for clarity, conciseness and simplicity ruffled a few feathers at the time, and compromises had to be made in the tradition. Surprisingly, now, almost 60 years later, the results that have been reached hark back to Aicher’s original intentions. [Note: I became aware of this first-hand because I personally spent a few years working closely with Aicher on his Rotis typeface project and he often spoke of Lufthansa and other clients.]

NOTE: A great review of Lufthansa’s design was already published February 8th, 2018: Feeling Blue.


Much ado about nothing?

As is often the case, the customer’s experience of the brand is very different to how marketing assumed it would be. Lufthansa simultaneously sent out an email (presumably to all customer program members, in modified form also used as a manifesto by advertising motif), which is thought-provoking as it overdoes it with self-praise while in many staccato sentence fragments manage to forget possible customer benefits.

  • The introductory sentence starts with “We” (in terms of “We at Lufthansa” and not “We as a community”).
  • From the outset, the customer is stylized, to put it bluntly, as the “flight attendant”.
  • It is assumed that customers must follow the Lufthansa claim.
  • The advertised claim, in modern hashtag dexterity, #SayYesToTheWorld is laughably banal and implies that Lufthansa customers can best take off by being a yes-person.
  • Last but not least, the key visual in the email shows the tail fin of a plane, as if the person in question had just missed his flight…
  • And last but not least: It’s not personal! An option or even an active request for the email recipient to give immediate feedback to the modernized Lufthansa “outfit” by return is not included. What a shame. Or is it? Because this goes against the values that the digital world stands for in the social media age.
  • Note: It should be assumed that many hundreds of thousands of customers have received the email, in any case presumably significantly more than had received it at the time of the email being sent by re-branding via the media customers.

In my view, the “crassly modern” digital electronic mail-shot back-fired because it does nothing for the customers – instead it wants to create a good impression. This brings to mind unsettling experiences which, as a long-standing senator of Lufthansa, I was continually subjected to.

 


Better late than never: reverse the communication course!

If it really is about the Lufthansa brand (its self-image as being a “premium” brand) being brought into the digital age, Lufthansa’s thinking and mode of communication needs be changed radically.

In my view, these aspects should be considered:

  1. It is crucial that the innovation and technology mechanisms be made use of so that dialog or conversations with customers take place in real time, to serve the optimization of services and products so that they are aligned with the individual needs of the customer.
  2. The brand itself is no longer at the center, instead it becomes a kind of mutual vehicle for companies and customers. Mass marketing becomes customized mass marketing. If, like the majority of established brand companies, the focus is placed on brand experience, to impress customers using the hopefully strong charisma of the brand through mass penetration and thus motivate the customer to make a purchase, in the best case, costs can be covered but it is barely possible to make profit from organic growth or to achieve profit margins in double-figures.
  3. The reality is unavoidable Customers are increasingly disappointed when brands have clearly lost personal contact with them.

 


 

My take

Sometimes the stork appears like a swallow which has not yet brought the summer with it. To avoid dissatisfaction and loss of loyalty from customers, in my opinion, what is needed is not necessarily a change in brand identity but first of all a change in the mission and a change in thinking by those in charge. By acknowledging globalization, cosmopolitanism and curiosity”, a start has been made. – But at least, put the customer first! – This is all the more important since Lufthansa, according to its own statement, is starting the largest investment in advertising in the history of the company” – after the company had the best financial year in its history in 2017, with 130 million customers recorded.

Supplement

As of June 5, 2018 Lufthansa does not come from the negative headlines. An embarrassing mishap at a football World Cup spot for Russia as well as constant improvements in the redesign are already more than amazing. Sounds like intended, but not skillful. — By the way, who, as I recently observed a Lufthansa jet in the new look at the start, notes that even at low altitudes above the city with the naked eye does not recognize that its a Lufthansa airplane … It just lacks the yellow! Ouch!

Lufthansa-Logovergleich-240575-detailp

Lufthansa recently had to change the blue of its new livery because it was too dark (Photo: Lufthansa)

 


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been working as an internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer and transformer for over 25 years. His activities focus on ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ with lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses & reports and strategic advice.

In his current ‘Think Paper’, Andreas Weber presents provocative thoughts on ‘Brand Experience vs. Customer Experience’. With the key questions: “What does a brand mean to a consumer? What does a consumer mean to a brand?”.

In case of interest, please send an email to receive the above-mentioned think paper: zeitenwende007{at}gmail.com

 

%d bloggers like this: