Advertisements

Archive

Tag Archives: Heidelberg

ValueCheckLensing ENG.001

“After four months using the subscription model, we can safely say we made the right decision!” — Robert Dembinski, Managing Director of Lensing Druck, Dortmund/Germany. — Photo: Heidelberg

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value  |  German Version

Can you instantly make a successful printing business even better? You can if you have the courage to try something new. “When I joined Lensing Druck in Dortmund in the fall of 2017, we were planning to invest in new presses. We ended up doing far more than that, though, and it was a good move,” recalls Managing Director Robert Dembinski. 

Lensing Druck had previously focused on maintaining its competitiveness for the benefit of customers, whose main criteria when ordering print products are delivery time and price. “When we heard Heidelberg had something new in the pipeline, we were curious but also somewhat skeptical,” Dembinski explains. “We found it hard to imagine what the subscription model from Heidelberg would involve and weren’t sure it would work,” he adds.

Dembinski studied business management, so the print shop business represents a change of career path. He was actually intending to develop a digital strategy with his colleagues, including new digital offerings to provide customers with a more comprehensive service and open up new business opportunities. The fact that the subscription model from Heidelberg provides new digital tools to transform both production management and business management step by step very much appealed to him and his way of thinking.

Lower costs and higher efficiency

Experts from Heidelberg started by analyzing the actual situation to evaluate the efficiency and productivity of Lensing Druck’s existing presses. This revealed that the assignment of presses needed to be optimized and also that costs were very high, especially for shorter runs. It therefore very quickly became apparent that an increase in efficiency and productivity was both necessary and feasible. The strategy adopted was to skip a generation when replacing the existing presses. A Heidelberg XL-106 9-P-L took over from two older presses – a Heidelberg CD 105-P+L and a KBA Rapida 106 8-P. At the same time, the company switched to the pay-per-use subscription model – including the Prinect Workflow and above all the Heidelberg Performance Plus consulting service – with a view to boosting efficiency and cutting operating costs.

“To be honest, no longer owning a press and being reliant on a single supplier for everything, including consumables, takes some getting used to,” Dembinski admits. “After four months using the subscription model, however, we can safely say we made the right decision! Even in this short space of time, we’ve significantly improved the overall efficiency of our presses and our production volume is already over 20 percent higher than the target level contractually agreed with Heidelberg,” he continues.

Heidelberg Subscription Model.png

Website screenshot to showcase the full range of elements of the Heidelberg Subscription model. 


 

Assistant ensures absolute transparency

Lensing Druck is impressed by the clear and neat structure of the subscription model from Heidelberg and also its absolute transparency. “As I see it, the Heidelberg Assistant is the key component and the brains behind the entire model. All KPIs can be accessed in real time, as can the service status, industry benchmarks, and much more besides,” Dembinski comments. 

The Heidelberg Assistant is used at various levels in the Lensing Druck hierarchy – from senior management to operations/pressroom managers and purchasing staff. Its webcast function is also utilized for monthly meetings with the Heidelberg team to discuss the project status. This results in further new ideas and optimizations being identified over time, the ultimate aim being not only to meet the joint productivity targets but to exceed them by as large a margin as possible. 

Another important thing in Dembinski’s eyes is that print shop staff have responded very positively to the digital transformation using Heidelberg Subscription. “Switching to the new press has motivated our staff, because it shows we’re committed to print despite a difficult market. Thanks to the data we obtain from the press and the monthly review, we can support our employees in all aspects of their work and enable them to make progress,” he stresses. Various charts showing the monthly data and statistics are also displayed right next to the press for everyone to see.

Robert Dembinski shared with a group of international journalist his passion for Heidelberg Subscription. — Video animation: Andreas Weber. Group photo: Christian Daunke.


“We made the right decision!” 

“After four months using the subscription model, we can safely say we made the right decision!” sums up Dembinski. Heidelberg Subscription enables him to incorporate the presses in Lensing Druck’s own digital strategy. And – crucially – the subscription model makes it easier to develop other applications such as dynamic pricing, dynamic planning and procurement, real-time information for customers, reliable and transparent costings, and predictive monitoring for optimum maintenance processes.

Dembinski is also hoping the digital transformation of the entire company will improve Lensing Druck’s image, especially with customers who have experience in digital marketing. End-to-end digital order processing is an absolute must for such customers. To raise the print shop’s digital profile and coincide with the new digital portfolio, the post of CDO (Chief Digital Officer) was created in September 2018. 


My take: When it works, it really works!

The example of Lensing Druck and Robert Dembinski proves that when something works, it really works! Print has arrived in the digital age and can hold its own – especially if decision-makers and staff at print shops accept, understand, and embrace the digital transformation and ensure its beneficial further development. Being one of the first to use Heidelberg Subscription very quickly paid off for Lensing Druck, and it will have a dynamic and stimulating effect on the company’s future development. What’s more, print specialists, commercially astute business managers, and digital marketing professionals are all impressed. What more do you want? 

 


Link to contact Robert Dembinski

Link for information about Lensing Druck

Link for the latest Heidelberg Subscription news


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been a print expert and internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer, and networker for over 25 years. His activities focus on transformation for the digital age and include lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses, reports, and strategic advice. – His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires readers from over 150 countries worldwide.

About ValueBlog IMG_9105

Advertisements
ValueCheck DOG Heidelberg Assistant.001

Revealing: Great conversation about the Heidelberg Assistant at the pharmaceutical service provider D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt, Germany. Photo: Heidelberg

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

 


“For me, Heidelberg Assistant is a tool that is very important to our digitization strategy, one that is indispensable for the future.”— Andre Gass, IT specialist and senior executive at D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt


 

Managing processes with the aid of digital communications creates transparency in real time for complex technical procedures and takes industrial print production to a whole new level. This was the most important insight gleaned from the follow-up meeting with D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt. 

The aim of the meeting was to examine the use of the Heidelberg Assistant as a central digital management platform in a highly specialized print shop. D.O.G. was represented at this meeting by senior executive Andre Gass, who, as a qualified IT specialist, deals primarily with the Heidelberg Assistant and intelligent data analysis for the operational and technical management of the print shop. Tom Oelsner, Head of Innovation at the Heidelberg Digital Unit, also attended the meeting on behalf of Heidelberg.

 


Information box

Precision and reliability based on flexibility and innovation

D.O.G. GmbH is a family business and has specialized in work for customers in the German and European pharmaceutical industry and the cosmetic and airline sectors since it was founded in 1996. The solutions in its portfolio include sophisticated print products and services such as packaging inserts, booklets, standard labels, piggyback labels, outserts, folding cartons, labels for folding cartons, design and consulting services, logistics, and engineering. Everything at D.O.G. is genuine precision work, which is monitored by customers through audits. Founder and Managing Director Johann Gass has ushered in a new era so that his company can meet the requirements of the digital age in the best way possible. Three of his children have also joined the team. D.O.G. runs production operations at two sites in western Darmstadt and has been using the Heidelberg Assistant since June 2018. 

The Heidelberg Assistant is a universal web platform that allows various users to digitally manage all the relevant aspects of a print shop. These aspects include, for instance, the printing technology in use (including performance measurement and predictive monitoring), support, purchasing through an eShop, and administration. The combined use of Heidelberg IDs and customer-/employee-specific dashboards supports personalized access to the system and allows companies to integrate all specific components in a customized and scalable way. The Heidelberg Cloud ensures the best possible connectivity and provides an optimum means of sharing data and knowledge. After being launched initially in Germany, Switzerland, the USA, and Canada, the project was rolled out in Japan in July 2018. And there are more countries to come. The platform has an open design and can even integrate products from other manufacturers. The basic version is available to all customers free of charge.


 

Useful to customers from day one!

“Following the launch with around 30 customers in December 2017, it is clear that industrial customers with an affinity for services and cutting-edge equipment draw particular benefit from the Heidelberg Assistant. Right now, there are already over 200 customers using the Assistant. There’ll be 500 by the end of the year,” Oelsner states confidently. The aim is to make both the platform and Heidelberg Cloud meet the highest security standards.

Oelsner sees his collaboration with IT specialist Andre Gass as the perfect opportunity to put the platform through its paces and make sure it continues to evolve. Thanks to the modular design of the Assistant, new customer requirements can be integrated as add-ons as necessary. A new release goes live every three months. “The capacity utilization is very high right from the start. There are many customers who use the Heidelberg Assistant several times a week, some even daily,” explains Oelsner.

 

Tom Oelsner IMG_4927

Tom Oelsner, Head of Innovation at Heidelberg Digital Unit, is pushing the digital transformation forward. Photo: Andreas Weber

 

This high intensity of use appears to be rather consistent across the individual markets, although market penetration has progressed furthest in Switzerland: “The Assistant offers the widest range of applications for customers with machines connected to the Heidelberg Cloud. In Switzerland, around 50 percent of this customer group already uses the Assistant, mainly to boost productivity and get advance warning of potential failures.” The feature in highest demand appears to be the service status, which, thanks to its traffic-light system, can be checked at a glance. 

The ability to customize the platform makes it particularly appealing to users – this even includes assigning names to machines and photos of installed machines and print shop employees. 

Oelsner explains: “It’s really important to us that we can put the customer at the very heart of what we do. That means we make it possible for our customers to give their staff exactly the support they need for their respective tasks. For instance, employees can select the events for which they would like to receive a messenger or email notification. “Do you still use the telephone or do you use the Heidelberg Assistant?” That has to be the question we ask customers – because they can now track service processes, spare part deliveries, predicted failures, and productivity 24/7 without having to make a single call. 

The many benefits of digital communication and smart automation

Managing maintenance operations has to be a key focal point for industrial print shops, as Gass is well aware. The Assistant automatically generates a maintenance calendar, which helps customers find the best way to incorporate various machines into production planning. After all, downtimes lower productivity and so, in principle, should not occur unless scheduled. Maximizing the availability of production systems is important, first and foremost, in giving print shops the flexibility they need when plans change because the customer has moved a deadline. Workflows must always be designed to achieve maximum productivity. 

“Digital communication with Heidelberg Service, either through the Assistant’s messaging system or the eCall functions [for instance, the machine automatically reports and documents signs of faults], really takes a lot of weight off our shoulders. Nothing gets lost, and all processes are always running at optimum level,” Gass explains. He appreciates the platform’s clear structure, transparency, and user-friendliness. 

“Our core values of reliability, commitment to quality, flexibility, and innovation are fully reflected in the Assistant, which helps us considerably when it comes to doing the best possible job in the interest of our customers,” adds Gass.

Gass worked very closely with the Heidelberg Assistant while preparing for the installation of a new Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106-2-P. “We take a very methodical and structured approach to everything we do, and always push ourselves to the limit when it comes to performance and quality. This is because customer requirements, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, are extremely high.” Gass has been very impressed by the way Heidelberg makes the premium technology of its hardware and software both transparent and simple to use. 

“We’re really benefiting from everything the Assistant is making possible because reaching a high level of digitization is very much a priority, not just for us but also for our customers. This is because one of our core missions is to create the best possible interfaces to our customers’ highly diverse systems,” explains Gass. Orders are sent to the print shop digitally and can then be managed and monitored on an entirely digital basis and optimized using process management where appropriate. 

 

20180906_Bild_3_HDA-DOG-Weber_L096_1

Andre Gass (left) and Tom Oelsner enjoyed their conversation. Photo: Heidelberg

 

As a result, it may become necessary to create an interface between the Heidelberg Assistant and the ERP system at D.O.G. for future use. Oelsner adds: “A system connection is already being tested for error messages. This allows the customer’s system to send an XML file to the Assistant for electronic processing without an employee having to fill out a new form.”

However, it is important to make full use of the wide range of options already available first, primarily with regard to the platform’s add-on options, and particularly those relating to performance measures. The basic version of the Assistant provides the customer with KPIs. Additional options for more detailed analysis can be agreed in a separate contract.

Important outcomes: Speed, error prevention, convenience functions

Gass has been impressed by the integration of the Heidelberg eShop, which is tailored to the specific needs of his company: “We have preconfigured shopping lists, and it only takes a few clicks to put together the right order. The eShop range adapts to our requirements and selects the consumables we actually need. Incorrect orders are now a thing of the past. Even today, the Heidelberg eShop is already designed to work fast.

According to Oelsner, it takes an average of 70 seconds to place an order using shopping lists. In the future, the necessary order volumes will be calculated on a predictive basis using key data from production and the customer will be advised on when to place an order, so that no surplus stock has to be stored in the print shop.

With the exception of a completely autonomous ordering process, which will be available in future configurations of the Assistant, the print shop could not have chosen a more dependable procurement system. 

 

20180906_Bild 1_ HDA-DOG-Weber_L020

Andre Gass, IT specialist and senior executive at D.O.G. GmbH in Darmstadt puts digitization in the focus to strengthen the printing business.

 

There is another feature of the Assistant that Gass finds particularly practical – users can intervene if necessary, and are not solely reliant on automation. Oelsner goes on to discuss the feedback he’s gotten from many customers: “All kinds of additional documents, such as text, images and video, can be sent to Heidelberg using the service system, even an audio file of a rattling sound, which would be difficult to explain otherwise.” 

For Gass, this represents a significant improvement to communication and a noticeable increase in the speed and quality of troubleshooting. He also believes it is important the system documents what it does, so as to create transparency for the management team. 

Gass summarizes his experience with the Assistant: “For me, Heidelberg Assistant is a tool that is very important to our digitization strategy, one that is indispensable for the future. What’s more, everything we’re familiar with in terms of modern digital communication through social media in our private lives is also offered by the Assistant for our business matters: Messenger and chat functions, notifications, and much more. Everything is recorded automatically in timelines and can be researched later on.”

 


 

DOG Kompakt

Screenshot from D.O.G.’s website. 

 


 

My take – times are changing. And that’s perfect!

In the print business, there is still a lot that can be done much better as part of a smart digitization strategy driven by IT expertise. This is particularly true when tech manufacturers, like Heidelberg in the case of the Heidelberg Assistant, create innovative, scalable and interactive platforms that print shops can use in structured, personalized and creative ways. 

At D.O.G. in Darmstadt, they aren’t just aware of this – they’re actively integrating it into their new business strategy, making it an important part of this new era in the company’s management. This is all the more fitting, as D.O.G. aims for the highest level of quality and precision based on its clearly defined company values. 

Digital communication at every step in the industrial print manufacturing process is a must if you want to take a modern approach to business operations and the concerns of end customers. 

If all necessary business communication between the tech manufacturer and the customer in the printing industry can be optimized to such a degree, then everyone wins – with mutual benefits, profitable growth and sustainable development in business activities! —Andreas Weber

 


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been a print expert and internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer, and networker for over 25 years. His activities focus on transformation for the digital age and include lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses, reports, and strategic advice. – His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires readers from over 150 countries worldwide.

About ValueBlog IMG_9105


 

ValueCheck Transformation Paradox.001

“I think of Germany [4.0] at night,
then I’m about to sleep,
I can not close my eyes
and my hot tears are flowing.”
From: Heinrich Heine, night thoughts

„Denk ich an Deutschland [4.0] in der Nacht,
dann bin ich um den Schlaf gebracht,
ich kann nicht mehr die Augen schließen,
und meine heißen Tränen fließen.“
—Aus: Heinrich Heine, Nachtgedanken


 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

It happened last week. The CEO and the CFO of a long-established mechanical engineering company presented the annual balance sheet figures at the annual press conference in the financial metropolis of Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Everything fine. And everything on schedule! After all, they delivered precisely what was promised a year ago. Unfavorable: Currency fluctuations that can not be influenced result in a slight decline in total sales and corresponding pre-tax profits.

Nevertheless, the board can stick to the good forecasts. Significant growth through transformation by at least 500 million euros in the next four years (that is, sales grow from around 2.5 billion euros to 3 billion euros) with significantly increasing returns. The company has been successfully restructured and is not only fit and stable, but also a global leader in digital transformation beyond its own market segment.

But: Already on the eve of the press conference, the share price began to decline and slipped significantly in the following week. The main reason: massive short selling, so the bet on speculation on falling share prices. The market capitalization thus dropped in value by a three-digit million amount.

Another negative effect: the business press as well as analysts can not deal in the right way with “digital transformation”. At least, they don’t get it! — In the late reports it comes to glaring errors resp. misjudgments and above all to the omission of the really important topics! — For example: “Quite unambitious: weak outlook puts pressure on Heidelberger Druck shares”. Or: ”Heidelberg disappoint investors” … — Phew! Understand that, who wants!

Granted, the topic “transformation” is highly complex. And requires that one understands: transformation is not a goal, but a state. The goal is: massive, sometimes disruptive change in the overall business philosophy. Not an easy task. And certainly not that it is possible to manage on-the-fly! — The CFO rightly explained calmly: “If you are in a hurry, you have to go slowly!”

Speaking of philosophy, Plato pointed out in his ancient teachings that everything acquired under duress can not find a foothold in the mind. In other words, the teacher can not teach if the student is not ready to learn. (This momentum was probably underestimated by the CEO and CFO when they held the press conference and, unfortunately, was not the basis of their communication strategy.)

The success of transformation in the digital age depends crucially on the will and the discipline to take the time to learn and practice, so that new experiences form new insights. This learning involves learning about oneself. Transformation requires self-knowledge.

Conclusion

An annual press conference as a lesson! Germany 4.0 fails in the fundamental understanding of the ‘digital transformation’. Not at the will of the apologists.

 


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been a print expert and internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer, and networker for over 25 years. His activities focus on transformation forthe digital age and include lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses, reports, and strategic advice. – His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires readers from over 140 countries worldwide.

About ValueBlog IMG_9105

 


 

ValueCheck HDU.001

Photos: Heidelberg / HDU. Collage: Andreas Weber, Frankfurt am Main

 

“We’re remodeling customer interfaces for Heidelberg and creating a seamless digital ecosystem for its customers.” Rainer Wiedmann, Head of the Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU) and Chief Marketing Officer at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG.

German Version


New digital ecosystem for the print media industry

The new “leading light function” of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG heralded by CEO Rainer Hundsdörfer midway through 2017 is increasingly taking shape and making dynamic progress. “The new Heidelberg Digital Unit is boosting the company’s e-commerce business, online presence, and digital marketing expertise,” said member of the Management Board and Chief Digital Officer Dr. Ulrich Hermann just recently.

What exactly does that entail? Rainer Wiedmann discussed this publicly for the first time in an interview for ValueDialog. A successful digital pioneer, Wiedmann took charge of the Heidelberg Digital Unit start-up company (HDU for short) on April 1, 2018 in parallel with his role as the Heidelberg Group’s Chief Marketing Officer. – The interview was conducted by Head of Value Andreas Weber.

 

Info box

About the new Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU)

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-06-09 um 07.03.50

Website: https://hdu.heidelberg.com

Location: Wiesloch-Walldorf, with branches in China, the United States, and Asia

Initial workforce: 50

Objective: To enjoy dynamic growth and establish the number one digital ecosystem in the print sector

Partner: Internet specialist iq!

 

As CDO on the Heidelberg Management Board, Dr. Ulrich Hermann is a dynamic driving force behind the company’s digital transformation. 

 


 

Digital business models inspire the customer journey

Mr. Wiedmann, you were already a digital pioneer over 20 years ago when you founded the argonauten group, a multimedia agency that was an immediate success. What has changed since then?

Rainer Wiedmann: Back then, I was already heavily involved in shaping customer interfaces. This approach led by way of marketing innovation to e-commerce. Nowadays, the focus is on end-to-end digital business models. Thanks to IoT (the Internet of Things), machine learning, voice control, and similar innovations, a complete digital customer journey is now possible for the first time – not only sales & marketing, but many other parts of the value chain are being digitized. 

So you see this as a linear dynamic development?

Rainer Wiedmann: What I see is an extremely dynamic process. An online presence is no longer the be-all and end-all. Access to customers and interaction with them are the most relevant things. Based on the new approach, an optimum customer interface is essential if digitization is to generate value. 

What’s your motivation for treading new ground with HDU in the mechanical engineering sector, of all places?

Rainer Wiedmann: I started out as an engineer and, following my studies at the University of St. Gallen’s Institute of Technology Management, I gained vital experience with a large number of industrial customers. New forms of connectivity are rapidly transforming mechanical engineering, and Heidelberg is extremely well placed to benefit from this development. 

How so?

Rainer Wiedmann: Our machines have long been networked. We also have our own global sales and service organization with a portfolio incorporating hardware, software, and consumables. 

What’s more, the executive management team at Heidelberg understands exactly what transformation through digitization means, as demonstrated among other things by the new subscription model – a first in the industry. As I see it, all this creates the perfect conditions!  


 

HDU in a nutshell

 

How is the newly founded HDU positioning itself in this context?

Rainer Wiedmann: Our goal is to design customer interfaces for Heidelberg that create a seamless digital ecosystem for the company’s customers.

What are HDU’s core values?

Rainer Wiedmann: HDU is all about creating added value based on permanence, consistency, and relevance. Its main value lies in getting the maximum number of existing and potential customers to use the Heidelberg offering on a weekly or, better still, daily basis. It’s not simply a case of registering a large number of nominal users in the system, but of having as many active users as possible. As I see it, content, function, coverage, and interaction are the key to success.

Does your new approach with HDU fit in with the Heidelberg culture?

Rainer Wiedmann: On the one hand, the people at Heidelberg come across as being open and innovative. On the other, they like to follow precise rules. In the digital transformation context, however, I feel a more target-driven approach is vital for employees.

What does that achieve?

Rainer Wiedmann: One advantage of HDU that can be transferred to Heidelberg is that in order to achieve specified goals or optimize target achievement, we work as a team on the structure of rules so that we can make adjustments as and when required.

Heidelberg is indisputably strong when it comes to technical innovation. But what about the company’s customers? Are you aware of any reservations about digitization?

Rainer Wiedmann: Given that all kinds of print production have long been based on digital data, our customers are well advanced with the process of digitization, and e-commerce is nothing new to them either. Online printing has created a huge new growth market. Our approach of working closely with customers to offer a comprehensive package providing peace of mind has therefore proved very popular. If you know what needs to be done and the goals are clear, digitization in printing is regarded very much as an opportunity.

Digital print shop processes are one thing, but the go-to-market strategy in the digital age is another matter entirely. I see a weakness here. Am I right?

Rainer Wiedmann: The important thing in my eyes is for Heidelberg to demonstrate the positive effects of digitization as effectively as possible to customers who are in dialog with us. Only personal experience gives a proper impression of how print shops can also put this to good use in their own customer relations.


 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Screenshots from the Heidelberg Digital Unit’s new website.


HDU mission statements

“We develop innovative digital sales, marketing, and service solutions for all stages of the customer journey and deliver measurable results with a multidisciplinary team and external partners focused on success.”

“We contribute to the operational excellence of all Heidelberg units by offering a digital, state-of-the-art ecosystem that sets new standards in this area.”

“We don’t shy away from any risk. We rely on our entrepreneurial skills and make unexpected, disruptive decisions that enable us to score points with our customers.”

“We won’t let anything stop us achieving our goals and dreams. Continuously pursuing them and measuring our progress will see us succeed.”

“We embrace the digital age. We enjoy working with people who leave the office happy because everyone has done their best and is proud to be part of the team.”


 

It’s all about clear goals and measurable successes

HDU started out with 50 staff and is aiming to expand rapidly. What skills do you require?

Rainer Wiedmann: Around 80 percent of our initial team are very experienced and highly skilled in the print market. We’re adding new people who have experience in areas such as e-commerce, digital marketing, and social media. 

What’s special about your team?

Rainer Wiedmann: We have the right mix! The mutual respect and common goals of our “mixed” team make us particularly effective. The excellent market position enjoyed by Heidelberg and our geographical proximity to the company are very helpful and motivate us all. We are “Born in Heidelberg” – a statement that perfectly demonstrates our unshakable commitment. It also boosts our credentials as an employer beyond the confines of the sector.

How is HDU’s work being integrated into the Heidelberg Group’s everyday operations? And how is the collaboration going?

Rainer Wiedmann: We’ve gotten off to a very promising start because we actively approach Heidelberg staff, provide them with all the information they need, and listen to what they have to say. We have contacts for the individual Heidelberg business units and access to all the sales units. Our global Growth Hacking Tour has already started. We’re using it to raise the local profile of our portfolio in key markets, offer training on our new tools and software solutions, and introduce e-commerce initiatives that we’ve developed.

 

HDU Growth Hacking Tour 2018

Roadmap of the Global Growth Hacking Tour in the startup phase of the HDU. (Photo: screenshot from the HDU website)

 


Focus on maximum competitiveness and market relevance

Does that effectively mean HDU is offering in-house consulting and agency services at Heidelberg? 

Rainer Wiedmann: Yes, but we’re not uniquely a service provider. We offer support with customized tools, efficient campaigns, and in-depth know-how. And we enter into clear target agreements. Our task is to create measurable results and boost e-commerce sales. We focus closely on figures to deliver success. And we achieve results as a team when we generate leads and sales. 

What is the response to the Growth Hacking Tour? 

Rainer Wiedmann: People are immediately seeing that we’re coming to them with the offer of added value for their day-to-day work and demonstrating a true community spirit. As a subsidiary, we have a clear advantage. We’re creating a trusting relationship from scratch for joint success.

Looking beyond Heidelberg, competitors on the digital printing market are claiming they provide their own digital platforms as ecosystems for print. What can and do you want to do differently or even better?

Rainer Wiedmann: Yes, we have our rivals, but in our segment – commercial and packaging printing – we have the highest market shares and by far the largest installed base. What’s more, we’ve had the world’s largest database for presses for over ten years. 

And that means what?

Rainer Wiedmann: It enables us to offer even better functions and optimum access to our entire portfolio along with detailed knowledge of specific customer interests that is always up to date. Our extremely strong service is now helping to expand things again on the operating side.

So does that mean the HDU ecosystem must make it possible, based on the Heidelberg platform, to significantly improve all aspects of performance?

Rainer Wiedmann: We don’t simply want production to run smoothly at print shops. At the end of the day, we’re improving our customers’ competitiveness and market relevance – not just here and there but at all levels as far as possible. 

Hand on heart, as a digital expert, what do you say to the boss of a print shop whose customers tell him printing is outdated and they no longer want to use it?

Rainer Wiedmann: Print media will never disappear. In fact, we’re seeing growth in areas such as packaging, labels, and mass customization. Yes, there are shifts from analog to digital – in particular when it comes to company marketing – but new applications will keep on emerging. For me, HDU’s main task in the long term is to unlock this new potential and enable customers to act flexibly, proactively, and sustainably as times change.

How do you personally think HDU will fare in the short, medium, and long term?

Rainer Wiedmann: I’m more than confident. We’re sticking to the vision and mission we formulated for HDU. And we’re measuring our progress, then responding immediately.

– Thank you very much for this interview. 

 


 

My take on things – a solution of striking simplicity

It’s enough to take your breath away. Heidelberg is putting in an impressive sprint on the home straight, hurtling forward in a completely new guise – the Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU) – and showing the competition quite clearly who’s in first place when it comes to digital transformation. 

It’s official! A traditional company has without doubt completely reinvented itself – in record time –demonstrating the courage to take risks based on its wide-ranging expertise in printing and all things digital. Rather than abandoning much of the previous system, the company is using and optimizing it to benefit from new developments. One important additional aspect: Heidelberg has realized that in the digital age it’s no longer sufficient to aim for success with best-in-class product innovations.

Launching HDU in this form is a real stroke of genius in my opinion. A subsidiary designed as a start-up – fast, flexible, and firmly anchored with an excellent network – it provides new, user-oriented “digital” services for the Group and at the same time becomes a pacesetter with measurable results to make sales, marketing, and services permanently fit for the digital age on a global level. In my eyes, that’s the perfect way to firmly establish highly innovative products and solutions on the market on a lasting basis.

The biggest winners are Heidelberg customers and the market as a whole because, for the first time, they have access to a well thought-out, effective ecosystem in the form of an exponential platform that takes industrialprint production to a whole new level in the digital age and makes it fit for the future. To sum up, this is a real win-win situation – especially for Heidelberg staff, shareholders, and numerous new partners. 

The “crux of the ‘digital’ transformation problem” I identified in my #ValueCheck is thus soon set to be resolved!

 


 

Rainer Wiedmann

 

Rainer-Wiedmann-Kopie-1024x1024-700x700

 

Rainer Wiedmann comes from Stuttgart and is one of Germany’s great digital pioneers. After studying at the universities of Stuttgart and St. Gallen and gaining several years of professional experience, he founded the argonauten group (350 employees at 11 international locations) in 1996, the aquarius group (100 employees based in Munich, Hong Kong, and Shanghai) in 2005, and the iq! group (based in Munich and Palo Alto) in 2014.

The iq! group maintains close links with the new Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU), which started operating on April 1, 2018 with 50 employees.

HDU is a start-up company and a subsidiary of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, where Wiedmann plays a dual role as Head of HDU and Chief Marketing Officer. 

From 1999 to 2003, Wiedmann was President of the Deutscher Multimedia Verband e.V. (now BVDW e.V.). From 2003 to 2004, he was on the board of Gesamtverband Kommunikationsagenturen GWA e.V. in Frankfurt.

 


About the author

Andreas Weber has been a print expert and internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer, and networker for over 25 years. His activities focus on transformation for the digital age and include lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses, reports, and strategic advice. – His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires readers from over 140 countries worldwide.

About ValueBlog IMG_9105

 


 

ValueCheck HDU.001

Fotos: Heidelberg / HDU. Collage: Andreas Weber, Frankfurt am Main

 

„Wir gestalten für Heidelberg die Kundenschnittstellen neu und bauen ein nahtloses digitales Ökosystem für Heidelberg-Kunden.“ Rainer Wiedmann, Leiter Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU) und Chief Marketing Officer der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG.

English Version


Neues digitales Ökosystem für die Printmedien-Industrie

Die Mitte 2017 von Vorstandschef Rainer Hundsdörfer in Aussicht gestellte neue ‚Leuchtturm-Funktion’ von Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG nimmt in ungebrochen-dynamischer Form weiter Gestalt an. „Heidelberg baut mit neuer Digital Unit E-Commerce-Geschäft, Internetpräsenz und digitale Marketingkompetenz aus“, wurde jüngst durch Dr. Ulrich Hermann, Vorstandsmitglied und Chef Digital Officer, verlautbart.

Was verbirgt sich dahinter? Darüber gibt Rainer Wiedmann per ValueDialog erstmals öffentlich Auskunft. Wiedmann ist ein erfolgreicher Digital-Pionier und seit 1. April 2018 Leiter des Start-ups Heidelberg Digital Unit (kurz: HDU); gleichzeitig fungiert er als Chef Marketing Officer des Heidelberg-Konzerns. — Das Gespräch führte Andreas Weber, Head of Value.

 

Info-Box

Bildschirmfoto 2018-06-09 um 07.03.50

Fakten zur neuen Heidelberg Digital Unit GmbH (HDU)

Website: https://hdu.heidelberg.com

Standort: Wiesloch-Walldorf, Dependancen in China, USA und Asien

Mitarbeiterzahl zum Start am 1. April 2018: 50

Zielsetzung: Als dynamisch wachsendes Unternehmen ein führendes digitales Ökosystem der Print-Branche etablieren

Partner ist der Internetspezialist iQ!


Dr. Ulrich Hermann treibt als CDO auf Vorstandseben die digitale Transformation von Heidelberg dynamisch voran. 


Aufgabenstellungen für HDU

  • Bündelung globales Marketing und E-Commerce unter dem Dach der HDU.
  • Die unterschiedlichen Vertriebskanäle von Heidelberg in einem Kanal (Omnichannel) zu bündeln, zu harmonisieren und aufeinander abzustimmen.
  • Zusammenfassung aller Marketingaktivitäten mit dem Schwerpunkt auf den Ausbau und die Gestaltung des digitalen Kundenerlebnisses bei der Anbahnung von Geschäft sowie im laufenden Kundenkontakt.
  • Dem Kunden über alle Fachfunktionen bei Heidelberg konsistente Betreuung bieten, um produktübergreifend und entsprechend seines individuellen Bedarfs zu beraten.
  • Über den Ausbau der eCommerce Plattform profitiert Heidelberg im Gegenzug von Effizienz-Gewinnen bei der Lieferung von Verbrauchsmaterialen und Dienstleistungen.

 

Digitale Geschäftsmodelle beflügeln die Customer Journey

Herr Wiedmann, Sie gehörten bereits vor über 20 Jahren — damals mit der Neugründung der vom Start weg erfolgreichen Multimedia-Agenturgruppe Argonauten – zu den Pionieren im Digital-Sektor. Was hat sich seitdem geändert?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ich habe mich damals schon intensiv mit der Gestaltung der Schnittstellen zum Kunden beschäftigt. Der Ansatz führte über die Innovation im Marketing hin zu E-Commerce. Heute stehen ganzheitliche digitale Geschäftsmodelle im Fokus. Durch IoT (Internet-of-Things), Machine-Learning, Sprachsteuerung usw. ist erstmals eine vollständige digitale Customer Journey möglich, nicht nur Marketing & Vertrieb, sondern viele weitere Teile der Wertschöpfungskette werden digitalisiert. 

Sie sehen also eine linear-dynamische Entwicklung?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ich sehe eine äußerst starke Dynamik. Entscheidend ist heute nicht mehr die bloße Präsenz im Internet. Der Zugang zu Kunden und die Interaktion mit den Kunden haben die höchste Relevanz. Das neue Dogma lautet: Nur wer die optimale Schnittstelle zum Kunden bietet, kann über Digitalisierung einen Wert generieren. 

Was reizt Sie daran, ausgerechnet im Maschinenbau-Sektor mit der HDU Neuland zu beschreiten?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ich bin selbst von Hause aus Ingenieur und habe nach dem Studium am St. Galler Technologie-Management-Institut wichtige Erfahrungen mit zahlreichen Industriekunden gesammelt. Durch neue Formen der ‚Connectivity‘ ändert sich der Maschinenbau rasant. Heidelberg hat in diesem Szenario eine herausragende Position. 

Wieso?

Rainer Wiedmann: Unsere Maschinen sind lange schon vernetzt, Vertrieb und Service werden global in Eigenregie geführt, neben Hard- und Software ergänzen Verbrauchsmaterialien das Portfolio. 

Zudem verfügt Heidelberg über ein Top-Management, das Transformation durch Digitalisierung exakt versteht, wie man u. a. am Beispiel des in der Branche neuen Subscriptions-Modells sehen kann. Für mich sind das in Summe die allerbesten Voraussetzungen!  

In Medias Res: Was HDU ausmacht

Wie positioniert sich in diesem Kontext die Neugründung HDU?

Rainer Wiedmann: Wir gestalten für Heidelberg die Kundenschnittstellen mit dem Ziel,  ein nahtloses digitales Ökosystem für Heidelberg-Kunden aufzubauen.

Was sind die Kernwerte von HDU?

Rainer Wiedmann: HDU definiert sich durch da Stiften von Mehrwert geprägt durch Permanenz, Konsistenz und Relevanz. Der Wert von HDU besteht vor allem darin, möglichst viele Kunden und Interessenten mit wöchentlicher, sondern besser noch täglicher Nutzung einzubinden. Entscheidend dabei ist, eben nicht nur viele Nutzer im System zu registrieren — quasi als Karteileichen –, sondern möglichst viele „Active Users“ zu haben. Content, Funktion, Reichweite plus Interaktion sind aus meiner Sicht der Schlüssel zum Erfolg.

Trifft Ihr neuer Ansatz mit HDU die Kultur bei Heidelberg?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ich erlebe die Menschen bei Heidelberg einerseits als offen und  innovativ. Andererseits handelt man gerne nach exakten Regeln.. Im Kontext mit digitaler Transformation gilt aber aus meiner Sicht: Man muss die Mitarbeiter stärker über Ziele führen…

… und was bringt das?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ein Vorteil von HDU, der sich auf Heidelberg übertragen lässt, ist es, dass wir zum Erreichen vorgegebener Ziele bzw. der optimalen Zielerreichung an der Struktur der Regeln im Team arbeiten, um konstant Anpassungen vornehmen zu können, sobald dies nötig wird.

Die technische Innovationsfähigkeit bei Heidelberg ist unbestritten. Wie sieht es aus Ihrer Sicht bei den Heidelberg-Kunden aus? Gibt es Vorbehalte gegenüber der Digitalisierung?

Rainer Wiedmann: Die Digitalisierung bei unseren Kunden ist weit vorangeschritten, denn digitale Daten sind schon lange die Basis für Print-Produktionen aller Art. Auch E-Commerce ist kein Neuland. Durch Online-Print via Internet ist ein riesiger neuer Wachstums-Markt entstanden. Unser Ansatz, mit den Kunden intensiv zu arbeiten, um quasi ein digitales ‚Rund-um-sorglos-Paket‘ anzubieten, wird darum sehr gut aufgenommen. Wenn man weiss, was zu tun ist, die Ziele klar sind, wird Digitalisierung im Print durchweg als Chance gesehen.

Digitale Prozesse in der Druckerei sind das eine. Das Go-to-Market im Digitalzeitalter das andere. Hier hapert es aus meiner Sicht. Oder?

Rainer Wiedmann: Für mich ist es wichtig, dass der Kunde im Dialog mit uns durch Heidelberg bestmöglich erleben kann, wie sich Digitalisierung positiv auswirkt. Erst durch persönliches Erleben entsteht der umfassende Eindruck, wie Druckereien dies auch für ihre Kundenbeziehungen wirkungsvoll nutzen können.


 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Screenshots von der neuen Website der Heidelberg Digital Unit 


HDU-Mission-Statements

Wir entwickeln innovative digitale Vertriebs-, Marketing- und Servicelösungen entlang der Customer Journey und schaffen messbare Ergebnisse mit einem funktionsübergreifenden Team und erfolgsorientierten externen Partnern.“

„Wir tragen zur operativen Exzellenz aller Heidelberg-Einheiten bei, indem wir ein digitales, state-of-the-art Ökosystem bieten, das in diesem Bereich Maßstäbe setzt.“

„Wir scheuen kein Risiko. Wir verlassen uns auf unser Unternehmertum und treffen unerwartete und disruptive Entscheidungen, die uns beim Kunden nach vorne bringen.“

„Wir lassen uns nicht davon abhalten, unsere Ziele und Träume zu verwirklichen. Durch kontinuierliches Streben und Messen kommen wir zum Erfolg.“

„Wir leben digital. Wir arbeiten gerne mit Menschen zusammen, die happy das Büro verlassen, weil jeder sein Bestes geben konnte und stolz ist, Teil des Ganzen zu sein.“


Das Credo: Klare Ziele und messbare Erfolge

Sie sind bei HDU mit 50 Mitarbeitern gestartet und wollen rasch wachsen. Welche Talente brauchen Sie?

Rainer Wiedmann: Rund 80 Prozent unserer Startmannschaft sind sehr erfahren und äußerst kundig im Print-Markt. Das ergänzen wir durch neue Leute, die Erfahrung haben im E-Commerce, im Digitalen Marketing, mit Social Media und so weiter. 

Was zeichnet ihr Team aus?

Rainer Wiedmann: Der richtige Mix! Gegenseitiger Respekt und die gemeinsamen Ziele machen uns als „gemischtes“ Team besonders schlagkräftig. Die herausragende Marktposition von Heidelberg und unsere räumliche Nähe zum Unternehmen ist da sehr hilfreich und motiviert uns alle. Das drückt unser unverrückbares Bekenntnis ‚Born in Heidelberg’ bestens aus. Und macht uns über Branchengrenzen hinaus attraktiv als Arbeitgeber.

Wie wird die Arbeit von HDU in den Heidelberg-Konzern-Alltag integriert? Wie funktioniert das Zusammenspiel?

Rainer Wiedmann: Die Startphase verläuft schon einmal vielversprechend, da wir aktiv auf die Kollegen zugehen und umfassend informieren und zuhören. Wir haben Ansprechpartner für die einzelnen Business-Units von Heidelberg und Zugang zu allen Vertriebseinheiten. Unsere weltweite „Growth Hacking Tour“ wurde bereits gestartet. Hier machen wir uns mit unserem Angebot vor Ort in den Schlüsselmärkten bekannt und bieten Schulungen für unsere neuen Tools-/Software-Lösungen und stellen E-Commerce-Initiativen vor, die wir entwickelt haben.

 

HDU Growth Hacking Tour 2018

Roadmap der globalen Growth Hacking Tour in der Startphase der HDU. (Foto: Screenshot von der HDU-Website)


 

Im Fokus: Maximale Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und Marktrelevanz

Das heisst, Sie bieten durch HDU praktisch Beratungs- und Agentur-Dienstleistungen intern bei Heidelberg an? 

Rainer Wiedmann: Ja, wir pflegen aber kein reines Dienstleistungsverhältnis. Wir unterstützen mit maßgeschneiderten Tools, effizienten Kampagnen und profundem Know-how. Wir treffen dazu klare Zielvereinbarungen. Unser Auftrag besteht darin, messbare Ergebnisse zu schaffen und den Umsatz im E-Commerce zu steigern. Wir sind extrem zahlengesteuert, um erfolgreich sein zu können. Ergebnisse erzielen wir im Team, wenn wir Leads und Umsatz generieren. 

Wie kommt die Growth Hacking Tour an? 

Rainer Wiedmann: Die Leute merken sofort: Oh, man kommt auf uns zu, liefert uns Mehrwert für die tägliche Arbeit und denkt gemeinschaftlich! Als Tochterunternehmen haben wir einen klaren Vorteil: Wir schaffen aus dem Stand heraus ein vertrauliches Miteinander für gemeinsamen Erfolg.

Ein Blick über den Tellerrand: Mitstreiter im Markt für Digitaldruck proklamieren ebenfalls für sich, digitale Plattformen als Ökosysteme für Print bereitzustellen. Was können, was wollen Sie anders oder sogar besser machen?

Rainer Wiedmann: Klar, andere Platzhirsche gibt es. Gleichwohl haben wir in unserem Segment, bei den Commercial und Packaging Printers, die höchsten Marktanteile mit der bei weitem größten installierten Basis. Und bereits seit über 10 Jahren pflegen wir die weltweit größte Datenbasis bei Druckmaschinen… 

… und das bedeutet?

Rainer Wiedmann: Das befähigt uns, noch bessere Angebote an Funktionen zu bieten und optimale Zugänge zu unserem gesamten Portfolio zu schaffen — bei detaillierter, stets aktueller Kenntnis der spezifischen Kundenbelange. Unser extrem starker Service hilft dabei, das nun auf der Betriebsseite wieder auszubauen.

Das heißt doch: Das HDU-Ökosystem muss ermöglichen, auf Basis der Heidelberg-Plattform die Performance in all ihren Dimensionen signifikant zu steigern?

Rainer Wiedmann: Wir wollen nicht nur, dass es bei Druckereien  in der Produktion rund läuft. Letztlich stärken wir die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und Marktrelevanz unserer Kunden nicht nur punktuell, sondern möglichst auf allen Ebenen. 

Hand aufs Herz: Was sagen sie als Digital-Experte einem Druckereichef, der von seinem Kunden zu hören bekommt: ‚Print ist Alte Welt. Wir drucken nicht mehr!‘?

Rainer Wiedmann: Der Druck, Print als Medium, wird nie verschwinden! Gerade etwa bei Verpackungen, Labels oder durch Mass Customization entsteht Wachstum. Sicher gibt es v. a. im Marketing von Unternehmen Verlagerungen von analog zu digital. Aber es werden sich stets neue Anwendungsbereiche auftun. Dieses neue Potential zu erschließen und Kunden zu ermöglichen, im Wandel der Zeit flexibel, pro-aktiv und zukunftssicher agieren können, darin sehe ich langfristig die Kernaufgabe von HDU.

Wie lautet Ihre persönliche Einschätzung für HDU kurz-, mittel- und langfristig?

Rainer Wiedmann: Ich bin mehr als zuversichtlich. Wir halten uns an das, was wir als Vision und Mission für HDU formuliert haben. Und wir messen, was wir tun. Und reagieren dann sofort.

—Besten Dank für das Gespräch. 


 

My Take: Das Ei des Kolumbus!

Kommentar von Andreas Weber, Head of Value

Es erscheint atemberaubend. Heidelberg gibt bei hohem Tempo auf der Zielgeraden nochmal ordentlich Gas, katapultiert sich quasi mit einem neuen Cockpit, der Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU), nach vorne und verweist die Konkurrenz in Sachen digitale Transformation sehr deutlich auf die Plätze. 

Damit steht fest: Ein Traditionsunternehmen hat sich definitiv komplett neu erfunden. In Rekordzeit. Mit Mut zum Risiko basierend auf umfassender Kompetenz im Print und im ‚Digitalen‘.

Und zwar in der Form, dass nicht etwa Vieles, was war, über Bord geworfen wird, sondern indem das Bestehende genutzt und optimiert wird, um es durch Neues anzureichern. Ein wichtiger Zusatzaspekt: Bei Heidelberg hat man erkannt, dass es im Digitalzeitalter nicht mehr ausreicht, allein durch Best-in-class-Produktneuheiten reüssieren zu wollen.

Die HDU in dieser Form an den Markt zu bringen, erscheint mir geradezu als ein Geniestreich: Eine als Start-up konzipierte Tochterfirma (schnell, flexibel, bestens vernetzt und solide verankert), die neue, nutzerorientierte ‚digitale’ Dienstleistungen für den Konzern erbringt und gleichzeitig mit messbaren Ergebnissen zum Schrittmacher und Taktgeber wird, um Vertrieb, Marketing und Serviceleistungen auf globaler Ebene dauerhaft fit fürs Digitalzeitalter zu machen.

Für mich bezeichnet das den optimalen Weg, hoch innovative Produkte und Lösungen nachhaltig im Markt zu verankern.

Die größten Profiteure sind Heidelberg-Kunden und der Markt insgesamt, da erstmals auf ein durchdacht-funktionierendes Ökosystem als exponentiell angelegte Plattform zugegriffen werden kann, um die industrielle Produktion von Print im Digitalzeitalter auf ein neues Level zu heben und zukunftssicher ausrichten zu können.

In Summe ein echtes WIN-WIN, gerade auch für die Heidelberg-Mitarbeiter, die Aktionäre und viele neue Partner. Damit sollte sich die von mir per #ValueCheck ausgemachte „Krux mit der ‚digitalen‘ Transformation“ bald beseitigen lassen!

 


Zur Person

Rainer-Wiedmann-Kopie-1024x1024-700x700

Der aus Stuttgart stammende Dipl.-Ing. Rainer Wiedmann gehört zu den ‚Digital’-Pionieren in Deutschland. Nach dem Studium an den Universitäten Stuttgart und  St. Gallen, Hochschule für Wirtschafts-, Rechts- und Sozialwissenschaften, sowie ersten Berufsjahren gründete er 1996 die argonauten-Gruppe (350 Mitarbeiter an 11 internationalen Standorten), 2005 die aquarius-Gruppe (100 Mitarbeiter an Standorten München, Hong Kong, Shanghai) und 2014 die  iq!-Gruppe (Standorte in München, Palo Alto).

Die iq!-Gruppe ist eng verzahnt mit der neuen, seit 1. April 2018 mit 50 Mitarbeitern gestarteten Heidelberg Digital Unit (HDU).

HDU ist ein Startup und Tochtergesellschaft der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, bei der Wiedmann in Doppelfunktion sowohl als Leiter HDU als auch als Chief Marketing Officer fungiert. 

1999 bis 2003 war Wiedmann Präsident des Deutschen Multimedia Verbands e.V. (jetzt: BVDW e.V.), Düsseldorf. Von 2003 bis 2004 gehörte er dem Vorstand Gesamtverband Kommunikationsagenturen GWA e.V., Frankfurt am Main, an.

 


 

Über den Autor

Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice. — Mit seinem Blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspiriert er Leser aus über 140 Ländern der Welt.

About-ValueBlog-IMG_9105

ValueCheck Packaging.001

Technologie-Entwicklungen im Print entfesseln die Marken-Kunst des Packaging | Im Fokus: Customer Experience und Mass Customized Marketing

Eine Analyse von Andreas Weber, Head of Value

Apple, Procter & Gamble (P&G), Nestle, Adidas, Chanel, Swarovski und viele andere Top-Marken tun es: Sie definieren sich im Digitalzeitalter verstärkt über High-End-Lösungen an der wichtigsten ‚realen’ Schnittstelle zum Kunden: Der Verpackung. 

Jährlich werden weltweit weit mehr als 1.000 Milliarden Euro aufgewendet, um Verpackungen zu konzipieren, gekonnt zu gestalten, zu produzieren und am Point-of-Sales in bestmöglicher Form zu präsentieren. Die talentiertesten kreativen Köpfe werden von Top-Marken eingesetzt, verstärkt auch „Techies“ und Media-Fachleute, um Verpackungen ständig weiter zu entwicklen. Verpackungen werden inzwischen als eigenständiges Medium im Kommunikationsreigen begriffen.

Die Verpackung als Markenbotschafter ist für Marken genauso wichtig wie das Produkt selbst. David Taylor, CEO, Chairman & President von P&G als größtem Werbungtreibenden der Welt, erklärte daher ‚Packaging‘ zur Chefsache und sagte vor kurzem: „Die Verbraucher erwarten von den Marken, denen sie vertrauen, überdurchschnittliche Leistungen und helfen dabei, einige der komplexesten Herausforderungen unserer Welt zu lösen. Unsere globale Reichweite, unser Verständnis der fünf Milliarden Verbraucher, denen wir dienen, und unsere Innovationsfähigkeit geben uns die einzigartige Möglichkeit, einen positiven Unterschied zu machen.“

Laut Taylor gehe P&G noch „bewusster vor, um die Verbraucher zu erfreuen und verantwortungsvollen Konsum zu ermöglichen.“ Er spricht damit nicht nur das Thema „Sustainability“ an (90 % der P&G-Verpackungen sind recyclebar), sondern auch technische Innovationen, die helfen, die sog. „Customer Experience“ zu beflügeln. [Quelle]

 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-05-30 um 09.35.19

P&G stellt bei seinem Internet-Auftritt seine Produkte inkl. Verpackung ins Zentrum – auch auf der Seite für Investoren.


 

Der „positive Unterschied“: Persönlich, individuell und kundenspezifisch

„You guys could take the lead in mass customization“, brachte es der US-Amerikaner Mark Schaefer auf einer Multichannel-Konferenz Anfang November 2017 in Orlando, Florida, auf den Punkt. Schaefer gehört zu den globalen Top-12 der Marketing-Gurus, ist Pionier im Social Media und ein gefeierter Bestseller-Autor gedruckter Bücher. 

Schaefer hatte sich im Detail mit seinem Publikum, die Elite der printkundigen Multichannel-Dienstleister aus aller Welt, und ihrem Innovations- und Leistungsangebot beschäftigt. Neben dem Mass Customization bei Produkten fasziniert ihn die Möglichkeiten des Mass Customized Marketing. Individualisiert gedruckte Verpackungen gehören dabei ins Bild.

Zugleich wurde aber offensichtlich: Es gibt ein Dilemma! Selbst die fortschrittlichsten Multichannel- und Print-Dienstleister sind kaum in der Lage, sich in der fachlichen, öffentlichen Diskussion gegen die puristischen „Only-Online-is-beautiful“-Propheten durchzusetzen. Mark Schaefer empfahl eindringlich, sich auch für Print (und damit v. a. für den Verpackungsdruck) kommunikativ besser in Szene zu setzen. 

 


valuepublishing-packaging

Info-Box —Boom-Markt Verpackung entfesselt neue Print-Techniken 

Rund 60 Prozent der jährlichen, globalen Investments von mehr als 1.000 Milliarden Euro liegen in der Kreation, den IT- und Workflow-Management-Prozessen. 40 Prozent, und damit über 400 Millionen Euro werden aufgewendet, um Verpackungen aller Art inkl. Etiketten und Umverpackungen zu drucken.

Damit wird deutlich, warum die Druck- und Papierbranche mit großer Wucht auf die Innovation durch die aufmerksamkeitsstarke Differenzierung von Verpackungen setzt. Bis dato waren dies vor allem außergewöhnliche Veredelungsmöglichkeiten wie Lacke sowie Metallfarben und speziell für den Verpackungsdruck konzipierte Sonderkonfigurationen von Maschinen und Medien.

Bedruckt und veredelt werden Verpackungen bisher vor allem im Flexo-, Offset-, Tief- und Siebdruckverfahren. Dies trägt den hohen Auflagen sowie Qualitäts- und Kostenanforderungen Rechnung. Gemeinsam decken Flexo- und Offsetdruck aktuell rund zwei Drittel des Weltmarkts für Verpackungsdruck ab.

Der Anteil des Digitaldrucks ist mit weniger als 10 % noch relativ klein, bietet also genug Raum für Wachstum. Dies wird sich mittelfristig durch die Fortschritte bei industriellen digitalen Drucktechniken ändern, denn auch bei den Verpackungen sinken die Auflagen. Hinzu kommt der Trend zur Individualisierung.

Übrigens: Innovative Verpackungshersteller setzen mittlerweile auf Online-Shops um auf diesem Wege den Kunden und Markeninhabern noch einfacher und schneller die Möglichkeit für individualisierte Verpackungen anzubieten. Ein gelungenes und professionell ansprechendes Beispiel hierfür ist www.designyourpackaging.de (siehe nachfolgend den Screenshot).


 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-05-30 um 10.06.46

Print ist ziemlich digital: Ein Online-Shop für Verpackungsdesign und -druck zeigt alle zeitgemäßen Möglichkeiten auf.


 

Innovations-Dilemma

Die Zahl der technischen Innovationsmöglichkeiten explodiert. An jedem Tag, praktisch im Minutentakt, werden Markeninhaber wie auch Agenturen mit neuen „digitalen“ Sensationen bombardiert. Die Print-Fraktion gerät dabei ins Hintertreffen. Für mich unverständlich, da man sich im Print-Sektor nicht zu verstecken braucht.

Denn Print ist „High-Tech-at-its-best“. Allerdings hat Print auch den höchsten Erklärungsbedarf und leidet unter zahlreichen Missverständnissen. Es gibt hierzulande auch kaum spannend inszenierte Fachveranstaltungen, bei denen sich Marketing-Fachleute wie auch die unterschiedlichsten Talente der Kreativ- und Agentur-Branche informieren können. 

Zumeist begnügt sich die Druckbranche damit, unter sich zu bleiben, Markenvertreter und Agenturen auf die Bühne zu holen, damit sie vor Druckereifachleuten reden, statt sie im Publikum sitzen zu haben. Das sollte und wird sich ändern. 


Bildschirmfoto 2018-05-30 um 10.39.07

Mein Tipp für Neugierige aus der Agentur- und Marken-Welt 

Im naturverbundenen Baiersbronn (Nordschwarzwald) hat die Firma colordruck Baiersbronn eine aus meiner Sicht folgerichtige und gut durchdachte Initiative ergriffen: „printSPIRATION: Think Digital“. 

Es geht um Innovationsthemen wie Mass Customization im Kontext mit neuen Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten mit Blick auf Time-to-Market durch höhere Relevanz, Flexibilität und Individualität. Den Auftakt bildet ein Workshop-Tag am 12. Juni 2018.

Kontakt und weitere Infos

www.colordruck.net/printspiration 

Merlanie Bengel LinkedIn

Melanie Bengel
T +49 7442 830-206
Email M.bengel@colordruck.net

 

Anmeldungen sind auch über Facebook möglich.


 

Zum Autor

Andreas Weber ist Gründer und CEO von Value Communication AG. Als Analyst & Berater für Erfolg mit Print im Digitalzeitalter ist er zugleich auch globaler Netzwerker und Publizist. Sein Blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspiriert Nutzer/Leser aus über 130 Ländern.

About-ValueBlog-IMG_9105

 


 

ValueCheck Inkjet Printing.001

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

Hardly a day goes by without manufacturers promising printers that inkjet printing is the measure of all things and will open up new markets and profits. Are they right? Well, yes and no. 

Yes, because the inkjet process is no longer just about printing on paper or cardboard, and thus extends beyond the scope of conventional printing; it is even possible to print on three-dimensional objects, as Heidelberger Druckmaschinen and Xerox are proving with their new systems.

No, because it is simply not true to say that inkjet printing could replace offset printing or open up entirely new areas of application for the printing industry off the cuff.

It is absolutely necessary to look closely and weigh up carefully to avoid finding yourself worshiping a golden calf. Here is a selection of my current observations: 

  1. Inkjet printing for professional, highly productive printing is relatively new. To date, the number of successful users in the printing industry can be counted on one hand. In all of their cases, the key to success was not to focus on printing technology, but on pre-media processes and finishing/processing with the inclusion of logistics/distribution. The best example: Peter Sommer and Elanders Germany in Waiblingen.
  2. Large inkjet printing volumes, which manufacturers like to invoke, have long been found in transactional printing. Here, processing and distribution can be seamlessly designed with IT expertise and automation. (Incidentally, this is the reason why a big player like Pitney Bowes got into the marketing of digital printing technology).
  3. Manufacturers are using inkjet printing to attract new customer groups outside the printing industry and transactional printing. Following drupa 2016, Canon Europe launched a new business unit as part of its reorganization, making it a pioneer in this regard. The Canon Graphic & Communications Group is introducing the creative industries as well as countless other industries, such as architects, craftsmen, etc., to inkjet printing with new systems.
  4. Since drupa 2016, it has become apparent for manufacturers that the inkjet revolution is devouring its own children. HP is making an appearance and Landa is getting nowhere fast, Bobst has made an about-turn and, with the founding of Mouvent AG, rethought inkjet printing with a clever cluster technology and much more. Heidelberg has teamed up with Fujifilm to develop Primefire: a breakthrough platform for high-quality inkjet printing that has caused a stir in the demanding packaging market. 
  5. Traditional companies such as the Durst Group have repositioned themselves: everything is aligned and optimized with the P5 philosophy, which maximizes the performance and availability of the printing systems and allows unprecedented flexibility in media and order processing. Incidentally, Durst’s innovations were a highlight at the Online Print Symposium 2018 in Munich. 
  6. Entirely new providers have quietly got themselves into position, making individually configurable, modular inkjet printing production facilities possible with new system architectures, as the company Cadis Engineering from Hamburg demonstrates. Cadis can print HTML data and dispenses with ripping, for example.
  7. The real winner in inkjet printing is currently a hidden champion: Book printing. Xerox Europe impressively demonstrated this in an impressive manner at the end of March in cooperation with Book on Demand GmbH at the #Books2018 event in Hamburg. A huge, automated print factory generates up to 25,000 book-for-one products per day in real time. The growth drivers are the Xerox Impika inkjet printing systems with sophisticated Hunkeler and Müller-Martini processing technology. The key feature is a new Impika ink that can easily print on uncoated papers to the best possible degree.
  8. Last but not least: If one can speak of massive substitution, then inkjet printing systems (sheet as well as roll) will most likely replace existing toner digital printing systems.

 

ValueCheck Peter Sommer Elanders ENG.001

Peter Sommer, Digital Printing and Inkjet Pioneer, Elanders Group: “The Elanders concept isn’t fixed to a specific printing technique. The central issues are always what the product needs to achieve and how it gets to the recipient. Integration into the supply chain begins with advising customers and ends with tailor-made logistics.”


Conclusion

There is still a lot that has to be done when it comes to inkjet printing. We’re only just beginning, and will have to learn how to think again in order not to fall into the innovation trap, where we wrongly assume that the primary purpose of inkjet printing is to improve on what we can do in print anyway.

When it comes to mastering the complex communication challenges of the digital age, it’s less about ‘faster, better, cheaper’ and more about ‘new, up-to-date and different’. — Think different!

 


About the author

Andreas Weber is founder and CEO of Value Communication AG. An analyst and consultant for success with print in the digital age, he is also a global networker and publicist. His blog www.valuetrendradar.com inspires users/readers from over 130 countries.

 


 

ValueCheck Peter Sommer 2018.001

„Der Markt hat erkannt, dass die Verbindung aus Print und Supply-Chain sexy ist. Diese Dienstleistung ist gefragt, weil die Kombination aus Druck und Lieferkette eine höhere Profitabilität verspricht.“ — Peter Sommer, Member of the Elanders Board, President Print & Packaging Worldwide.

Von Knud Wassermann und Klaus-Peter Nicolay

 

Prolog

2007 hatte Peter Sommer sein florierendes Druckerei-Unternehmen an die schwedische Elanders-Gruppe verkauft. Seither ist er in verantwortlicher Vorstands-Position für den Elanders-Konzern tätig. Jetzt hat er mit der Integration von Druck und Logistik eine neue Stufe des Supply-Chain-Managements gezündet, bei der den Kunden ein hoher Nutzen geboten wird.

Elanders hat im schwäbischen Herrenberg das erste integrated Packaging Innovation Center, kurz iPIC, eröffnet. Das Unternehmen bietet den gesamten Prozess vom Abholen des Produktes beim Hersteller über das Bedrucken und Verpacken bis zur Platzierung im Händlerregal aus einer Hand an. Ein interessantes Geschäftsmodell, über das wir mit Peter Sommer, President Print & Packaging Worldwide bei Elanders AB, gesprochen haben.

iPic-Grafik von Elanders

 

Im Fokus: Wachstum durch Innovation außer Konkurrenz

„Ich versuche meinen Mitarbeitern immer wieder aufs Neue zu verdeutlichen, wie wichtig es ist, bestehende Wertschöpfungsketten zu erweitern“, erläutert Peter Sommer, Member of the Elanders Board, President Print & Packaging Worldwide. Alleine mit dem klassischen Verpackungsdruck könne man auf Dauer nicht überleben, ist er fest überzeugt. „Da viele in der Branche die Verpackung als Insel der Seligen sehen und in dieses Segment einsteigen, erhöht sich der Wettbewerbsdruck. Die logische Konsequenz ist Preisverfall. Die Preise befinden sich bereits auf Talfahrt“, stellt Sommer fest.

An Marktgegebenheiten wie diesen lässt sich leider nicht viel ändern. Wohl aber am Marktumfeld. Daher hat die Elanders Group als Erweiterung mit Wachstumspotenzial Fulfillment und Logistik für sich ausgemacht. Dabei ist Supply-Chain-Management das Schlagwort, das prozessorientiert die Flüsse von Rohstoffen, Bauteilen, Endprodukten sowie Informationen entlang der Wertschöpfungs- und Lieferkette (Supply Chain) umfasst.

Vor knapp vier Jahren verabschiedete sich Elanders von der Rolle des Stand-alone-Druckers und schlug mit der Übernahme von Mentor Media in Singapur Anfang 2014 ein neues Kapitel auf. Das Unternehmen mit einem Jahresumsatz von damals rund 200 Mio. US-Dollar hat sich auf das Supply-Chain-Management von IT-Riesen wie HP, Dell, Acer, Sony oder Microsoft spezialisiert. Für diese produziert Mentor Media Verpackungen, sorgt für die Konfektionierung und die Auslieferung der Produkte.

Im Juni 2016 wurde das Engagement bei Fulfillment und Logistik durch den Kauf der Logistic Group International (LGI) weiter gefestigt.

 


LGI_LKW_fahrend

›We supply the world‹

Um die Dimension dieses Geschäftes einmal zu verdeutlichen: LGI ist nicht irgendeine Spedition, LGI gehört mit einem Umsatz von rund 430 Mio. € und rund 4.000 Mitarbeitern an 45 Standorten in Europa, USA und Russland zu den führenden Unternehmen in der europäischen Logistik.

›We supply the world‹ ist auf der Homepage der Elanders Gruppe zu lesen. Was auf den ersten Blick verblüfft, macht beim Blick auf die Zahlen jedoch deutlich, wohin die Reise bei Elanders geht. Der Konzern erwirtschaftete 2016 mit seinen etwa 6.500 Mitarbeitern in 20 Ländern rund 900 Mio. € Umsatz. Auf den Bereich Print & Packaging entfielen 2016 nur noch 34% des Umsatzes – 2013 waren es einmal 100%.

Und im September 2017 reduzierte sich der Anteil weiter auf knapp ein Viertel des Umsatzes, der nach dem 3. Quartal bereits bei fast 700 Mio. € lag und gegenüber dem Vorjahr um 71% zugelegt hatte. Die Zahl der Mitarbeiter stieg dagegen nur moderat auf 6.700.

Im August 2017 wurde das ‚integrated Packaging Innovation Center‘ (iPIC) in Herrenberg mit 200 Mitarbeitern etabliert, „wo wir gemeinsam mit unseren Kunden Supply-Chain-Lösungen umsetzen. Die Resonanz vom Markt auf unser Angebot ist ausgesprochen positiv“, erläutert Peter Sommer. Denn mit dem Logistiker LGI im Rücken könnten völlig neue Synergien bei Verpackung und Logistik genutzt werden. 

 


Ungebrochen: Investments im Offsetdruck 

Elanders Deutschland beschäftigt sich bereits seit längerer Zeit mit derartigen Konzepten und hat sie schon vor einigen Jahren in vergleichsweise kleinem Maßstab umgesetzt. Am Standort Waiblingen werden im Digitaldruck personalisierte Verpackungen mit Schokolade bestückt und direkt an die Verbraucher versendet. Ritter Sport, Lindt und andere nutzen dieses Angebot.

In Herrenberg wurde dieses Konzept jetzt auf ein industrielles Niveau angehoben. Dazu wurde seit Langem wieder in den Offsetdruck investiert. Insgesamt hat Elanders 12 Mio. € für zwei Heidelberg XL-106, eine mit fünf und eine mit sieben Druckwerken sowie jeweils einem Dispersionslackwerk, in die Hand genommen und zudem in erhebliche Stanzkapazitäten investiert.

Anstoß für das Projekt war eher ein Zufall, schildert Peter Sommer: „Ein Kunde, der Wasserfilter in China produzieren lässt, berichtete uns, dass sein Lieferant immer mehr Wasserfilter und die dazu notwendigen Verpackungen in Eigenregie produzieren lässt und die Differenz auf eigene Rechnung verkaufe. Das ist heute offenbar die Realität in China.“

Aber es gebe noch weitere Gründe, warum Unternehmen Teile der Supply-Chain wieder nach Europa verlagerten: Durch den langen Transport geht wertvolle Reaktionszeit verloren, um kurzfristig auf die Veränderungen des Marktes und des Handels zu reagieren.

 

Peter Sommer im Drucksaal


Gesamte Supply-Chain im Blick

Mit dem iPIC verzahnt Elanders nunmehr den Druck, Fulfillment und Logistik so stark miteinander, dass sie zum festen Bestandteil der Supply-Chain werden. Der Kunde vergibt an das iPIC keinen einzelnen Druckauftrag, sondern die komplette Dienstleistung.

Im Grunde genommen agiert iPIC ähnlich wie Unternehmen, die erfolgreich im Outsourcing unterwegs sind. Diese stellen im Kundenauftrag beispielsweise Kaffeemaschinen her, kaufen die notwendigen Bauteile, Verpackungen und Bedienungsanleitungen ein, bauen die Maschinen zusammen, verpacken sie, transportieren sie bis zum Retailer und stellen sie ins Regal.

„So kann man sich das in etwa vorstellen, nur dass bei iPIC nicht die Herstellung eines Produktes, sondern der Druck der Verpackung, Fulfillment und die Logistik im Mittelpunkt stehen und integriert sind“, erläutert Peter Sommer. Die Vorteile für die Kunden liegen auf der Hand. „Wir bieten dem Kunden ein echtes One-Stop-Shopping. Er muss sich nicht mehr darum kümmern, wo er einzelne Dienstleistungen einkaufen kann, sondern erhält von uns das komplette Paket.“

Allerdings setze dies eine andere Art des Verkaufes voraus. Der klassische Drucksachenverkäufer sei hier fehl am Platz; hier werden eher betriebswirtschaftliche Berater benötigt, die die gesamte Supply-Chain im Visier haben.

 


 

Bildschirmfoto 2018-03-11 um 11.49.30.png

 


Kompetente Outsourcing-Partner sind begehrt!

Von diesem Konzept können nahezu alle Branchen profitieren, vor allem Unternehmen, die viele kleinteilige Komponenten zu verpacken haben oder diese in ein Display platzieren und ausliefern müssen. „Für viele Unternehmen gehören das Fulfillment und die Logistik nicht zur Kernkompetenz. Diese sind auf der Suche nach Outsourcing-Partnern“, erläutert Sommer.

Interessant ist auch der Blick auf die Kostenverteilung. Ist das Produkt erst einmal gefertigt, muss es verpackt und von A nach B transportiert werden. Dabei entfallen nach Schätzungen von Peter Sommer rund 25% der Kosten auf die Verpackung und Bedienungsanleitung und der Rest auf das Fulfillment sowie die Logistik. Da in einem solchen Szenario immer die gesamte Supply-Chain betrachtet werden muss, erkennen die Kunden den Wert der Gesamtleistung und einzelne Positionen stehen nicht so stark unter Preisdruck.

Dabei müssen die Drucksachen nicht zwingend alle im iPIC produziert werden. Je nach Auflagenhöhe beispielsweise von Bedienungsanleitungen sind, können diese aus der Offsetdruckerei eines Schwesterunternehmens im Ausland oder bei Digitaldruck-relevanten Inhalten aus dem Werk in Waiblingen aus dem Inkjet-Druck beigesteuert werden.

„Das Konzept ist also nicht auf eine bestimmte Drucktechnik fixiert. Die zentrale Frage ist immer, was mit einem Produkt erreicht werden soll und wie es zum Empfänger kommt. Die Integration in die Supply-Chain beginnt bei der Beratung der Kunden und hört bei der maßgeschneiderten Logistik auf“, erklärt Peter Sommer.

Damit wird auch deutlich, wie breit Print & Packaging bei Elanders aufgestellt ist: Für die jeweiligen Anforderungen werden HP Indigo-Digitaldruck, High-Speed-Inkjet oder Offsetdruck an verschiedenen Standorten eingesetzt. Automatisierung und er gesamten Fertigung spielt eine große Rolle.

 

Kuka-Roboter

 


Punktgenaue Print-Services durch ‚Just-in-Sequence‘

Und nahezu alles, was Elanders Print & Packaging anbietet, hat in irgendeiner Form auch mit Logistik zu tun. So hat Elanders für Kunden aus der Automobilbranche bereits bewiesen, dass Bedienungsanleitungen im großen Stil in einer ‚Just-in-Sequenc‘-Belieferung punktgenau an das Fertigungsband geliefert werden.

Davon profitieren übrigens auch Verlage, die ihre Werke bei Elanders bedarfsgerecht, ‚Just-in-Time‘ und ab Auflage 1 produzieren lassen. Auch hier wird nicht einfach nur gedruckt. Die IT-Spezialisten bei Elanders entwickeln für Verlage komplette Lösungen für Druck und Auslieferung. Anbindungen an verlagsinterne ERP-Systeme, eine Vernetzung mit der Verlagsauslieferung und Ähnliches mehr gewährleisten ein automatisiertes, kosten- und zeitsparendes Druck- und Nachdruck-Management. Auch hierbei geht es um die Optimierung unternehmensübergreifender Prozesse, die ein großes Einsparpotenzial versprechen.

iPIC ‚nur’ als erster Schritt!

Mit dem Markteintritt von iPIC ist Peter Sommer sehr zu frieden und will in den nächsten zwei Jahren bereits einen Umsatz von 36 Mio. € erzielen. „Mit dem iPIC haben wir einen ersten Schritt getan, den Druck stärker in die Supply-Chain zu integrieren und für Kunden neue Leistungspotenziale aufzuzeigen. Denkt man noch einen Schritt weiter, kommt man bei Verpackungen relativ schnell zur Wellpappe für die Umverpackung. Im Zusammenspiel aus Logistik und Digitaldruck tun sich noch spannende Betätigungsfelder für uns auf.“

 


Elanders Lookbook Digital Print

Äußerst positives Feedback für das Elanders ‚Lookbook Digital Print‘! Damit viele bestmöglich von dieser einzigartigen Technologie profitieren können, hat das Elanders-Team einen Online-Kalkulator entwickelt. — Link zum Calculator  // Link zu weitere Informationen.

 


Den Nutzen für den Kunden in den Fokus rücken

Und dass es Peter Sommer bei dem aktuellen Angebot des ‚integrated Packaging Innovation Center‘ belassen wird, ist kaum zu erwarten. Es wird weitergehen. Denn er hat schon sehr früh erkannt, dass in der permanenten Produktentwicklung einschließlich dem Einsatz aktueller IT-Technologien eine Chance für Druckereien steckt, sich aus der Defensive und damit aus dem Preisgemetzel zu verabschieden.

„Wer sich seinen Kunden und potenziellen Geschäftspartnern gegenüber kreativ und innovativ zeigt, wird auch Erfolg haben“, ist Peter Sommer überzeugt. „Das mag manchmal seine Zeit brauchen, aber mit intelligenten Konzepten lassen sich kleine und große Unternehmen überzeugen.“

Dabei dürfe aber nicht das eigentliche Druckprodukt im Vordergrund stehen, sondern der Nutzen in den Fokus rücken. Erkennt der Kunde den Wert der Leistung, wird er auch bereit sein, dafür Geld auszugeben.

 


 

Preisverleihung mit Kronprinzessin Victoria von Schweden

Brillante Ideen, Unternehmergeist und bahnbrechende Technik: Das wurde im November 2017 in Leipzig durch die Schwedische Handelskammer in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland geehrt. Aus der Hand der schwedischen Kronprinzessin Victoria nahm Peter Sommer für Elanders den 15. Schwedischen Unternehmenspreis entgegen.

 


Print gewinnt als attraktiver Teil integrierter Services! 

Analyse von Klaus-Peter Nicolay

Während anderswo noch immer diskutiert wird, ob Druckdienstleister der Distribution und Logistik mehr Augenmerk widmen müssen, ist die Elanders Group schon einen erheblichen Schritt weiter. Sie hat die Logistik im Unternehmen so prominent platziert, dass das Drucken fast schon als ‚Abfallprodukt‘ im gesamten Dienstleistungsspektrum erscheint.

Der Schein trügt allerdings. Denn ohne Print wäre das Geschäftsmodell von Elanders ähnlich dem einer Spedition und nicht eines Allrounders für werthaltige Kommunikation mit Print.

Das ‚Integrated Packaging Innovation Center‘ bietet daher Verpackungsentwicklung, Druck und Finishing der Verpackung, deren Transport, die Lagerhaltung, Fulfillment (Verpacken des Produkts) und den Transport zum Kunden, Retailer oder gleich in die Regale des Handels. In dieser Lieferkette gehört fast alles, außer der eigentlichen Produktherstellung, zur Dienstleistung des iPIC.

Nun wird es den wenigsten Druckereien möglich sein, ein Logistikunternehmen im dreistelligen Millionenbereich zu kaufen und danach entsprechende Lösungen anzubieten. Das Beispiel iPIC kann aber durchaus dazu beitragen, über die Möglichkeiten nachzudenken, dem Drucken eine zusätzliche Komponente an die Seite zu stellen, um die Dienstleistung Print attraktiver zu machen und die Wertschöpfungskette um zusätzliche Leistungen zu erweitern.

 


 

Druckmarkt 113

HINWEIS:

Der Beitrag wurde erstmals im Print-Magazin Druckmarkt, Ausgabe 113, März 2018, veröffentlicht. Wir danken dem Verleger Klaus-Peter Nicolay für die bewährte Kooperation mit ValueTrandradar.com.

 

 

 


Print ganz besonders: Arbeitsproben von Elanders

Fotos: Elanders Germany.

 

Elanders Ritter Sport

Seit dem Jahr 2000 prägen Streifen die Kunst von Jacob Dahlgren. Nun hat er für Ritter Sport 12 verschiedene Designtafeln entworfen, die Elanders herstellen durfte!


Druck-Kunst

Druck-Kunst— Elanders produzierte für die Schrift-Künstlerin Sigrid Artmann, im Digitaldruck, dieses besondere Buch über Typografie und Kalligrafie: Artitüde!


 

Elanders Geschäftsbericht-Muster

 

Zum Portfolio bei Elanders gehören nach wie vor Geschäftsberichte einiger Global Player, mit ganz besonderen Special Effects im Print!

 


 

Eanders Weihnachtsgruss

Besonderes Augenmerk legt Peter Sommer für Elanders Germany auf edle, ideenreiche und werthaltige Grussbotschaften zu den Feiertagen. 

 


 

Auszeichnung von Elenaders für Soziales Engagement 2017

Für außerordentlich gesellschaftliches Engagement erhielt Elanders Germany die Auszeichnung ‚Sozial Engagiert 2017‘!

 


 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Photo: Heidelberg

 


“In today’s digital age with its cutting-edge business models based on networks and platforms, everything needs to be transparent, in real time, and focused on enhancing customer benefits.” – Professor h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview and analysis by Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German version

Successful printing doesn’t just happen. It’s all down to innovative plans and putting these into action. That’s the main focus of Chief Digital Officer Professor Ulrich Hermann, member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG since November 2016. In an exclusive interview, he explains the principles of the ‘subscription economy’, which is now firmly established at Heidelberg and is set to bring about success right from the get-go.

 


 

Note: In April 2018 some new reports in the news came up. Handelsblatt published via its global edition some great observations: Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG begins to look less like a factory and more like an information processing hub for industrial operations.“ — MORE

And more subscription customers got on stage, like Klampfer Group in Austria.  Or Lensing Druck Group in Germany.

 


 

The subscription economy is taking Heidelberg as a market leader and its primarily industrial customers to the next level of the transformation process. For the first time, printing performance is being assessed and billed on a customized basis, thus representing a brand new development and a challenge for the print sector. Conventional billing methods, i.e. selling equipment at a fixed price in offset printing or click charge models in digital printing, are being replaced by subscription models. This has its benefits.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info box: What is the meaning behind ‘subscription economy’?

The subscription economy correlates with the fundamental transition toward customized buying and selling in the B2C, and increasingly in the B2B, sector. The focus has shifted away from acquiring and owning products toward long-term, flexible customer relationships and ongoing customer benefits. The resulting technical and organizational demands are high. Some subscription-based solutions already exist in the printing industry, such as standalone software-as-a-service agreements. Important factors include automation, scalability, complex data models, and changed accounting principles right through to analytics. A constant supply of information on customer satisfaction and, most importantly, the way products and services are used is essential to enable businesses to further customize their services. What’s more, this data also helps both the supplier and customer achieve greater growth. Studies show that in the United States – the birth place of digitization – the subscription economy is already well-developed, generating approximately 800 billion US dollars in added value in the past ten years alone.  – aw


 

What is it all about?

The subscription economy could become the main focus in our sector, too. It has already achieved great economic success in the United States but remains largely disregarded in Germany. What difference will it make?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Subscription models offer a new approach for generating value by consistently focusing on customer benefits. Primarily, this means the end of product-oriented business models whose added value derives from creating a product, rather than from the benefit customers gain from that product.

Companies with analog models focused on manufacturing and selling products are eager to pass on expenses incurred in development, production, sales and supply to the customer as soon as possible. Whether customers are able to recover their costs is a question that is only considered relevant when it comes to the customer making repeat purchases, in other words it only becomes relevant at some point in the future.

What are the important features of a subscription?

It all boils down to a lasting customer relationship. This undoubtedly develops for services relating to the product, but not for the value of the product itself. 

A product-centric focus was the perfect approach for the analog world and shaped the industrial era for over 100 years because it was very difficult to quantify how the product was used and the associated added value for the customer.

In today’s digital economy, however, this approach is outdated as data is available on how products are being used and new business models are shifting the focus away from the value of the product itself and towards the usage value. We now aim to adopt this approach at Heidelberg as the leading supplier on the print shop market.

What are the advantages of focusing on the benefits to the customer and the disadvantages of focusing on the product?

As I’ve said, suppliers in the digital age can use platforms to gather, profile and analyze data on all participants with the aim of continuously and sustainably increasing customer benefits and thus instilling valuable, long-lasting customer loyalty. All processes must therefore focus on this and remain transparent for all participants in real time. If companies focus on the product, they can’t work out in any great detail or very quickly what it is their customers do with the product, when and how. Incidentally, that is a trend that affects many areas of professional and personal life…

… can you give a few examples?

It starts with reading a book or magazine, or when customers switch production equipment on or off, or why they are in the car and where they’re going. Manufacturers/suppliers usually know nothing about how their products are being used. As a result, they have to carry out costly questionnaires and analyses to anticipate how the products are being used and implement laborious improvements in long cycles.

During the analog era, innovations were therefore subject to protracted innovation cycles that were often staggered due to the risks involved. This led to analog companies spending a disproportionately large amount of time on optimizing internal value creation. It is clear that during this era the price of a product did not reflect how the customer used it but rather covered material and production costs.

 

A milestone on the road to the digital transformation and finally implementing the subscription program. A YouTube video of Dr. Ulrich Hermann discussing the market launch of the Heidelberg Assistant in December 2017.

 


 

The key to success

How can the focus be switched to customer benefits?

If we consider customer benefits to be the cornerstone of a company’s business operations, we end up with completely different approaches. Companies want to know what customers are paying for when using the products they have provided. This is exactly what disruptive business models in the digital world are based on. Usage patterns serve as the measure of all things – supported by the user experience and the customer journey.

Have companies in the print industry grasped this point? After all, nearly everyone nowadays is talking about customer orientation.

Technology suppliers often do not fully grasp that customer orientation, as a prerequisite to focusing on customer benefits, itself requires a comprehensive organizational transformation. Everything changes – from the mindset and culture right through to product creation. The ability to digitally measure the usage of products and services is key to creating added value. All business activities must pursue this aim.

Analyzing valid, long-term data collected from installed machinery and systems helps develop benchmarks with reference groups, which in turn enables the derivation of target figures and reference variables for optimum usage. We have been collecting such data at Heidelberg since the introduction of Remote Service technology back in 2004 and it has formed the basis for introducing Heidelberg Subscription.

With regard to the print industry, does this mean that it is not enough to simply introduce digital processes into print product manufacturing?

Exactly. In the digital economy, competition isn’t all about the product – the main focus is on developing the relevant user experience. I like to show a picture that presents the bustling streets of Manhattan as the heart of New York City. Some ten years ago, the streets were still filled with yellow cabs. Today, it’s dark sedans.

The product in this example is the same, just black and not yellow. It is a vehicle with a driver and passenger – and from the outside it is not immediately recognizable as a digital product. The difference, however, lies in the user experience. It is much easier to order, select, pay for and travel in a taxi with Uber and to influence the quality of the business model by writing a review.

Passengers feel like they are being taken seriously – as a business partner rather than a prisoner behind a plexiglass pane, if you like. It is no longer just about the service or product portfolio, but rather the customer journey and a new, intelligent way of using the product.

What does this mean in real terms for Heidelberg and its customers?

In our line of work, the subscription economy offers the opportunity to think about how we need to fundamentally change our business not just by selling machinery and services, i.e. billing for the product value, but by developing new models that assess the usage and the resulting positive effects.

 

This film on Heidelberg Subscription shows how Heidelberg is going down new paths in marketing, too.

 


 

How it works

What is the concept behind Heidelberg Subscription?

More than a year has passed since we began the transformation. We initially asked ourselves the following questions. What offers the biggest profit potential for our customers? Cost-effective printing capacity or optimum utilization? If our customers only derive added value from maximum machine utilization – in other words from optimized utilization of a coordinated combination of numerous individual products such as printing presses, consumables, software and services – why shouldn’t they actually pay us for this added value rather than for the individual components?

How did you go about answering these key questions?

A team of people with backgrounds in a wide range of disciplines such as finance, services, product development, sales and marketing / product marketing were tasked with developing a business model in which Heidelberg would not sell individual products to the customer, but rather offer the use of an end-to-end system that has been optimized for the specific needs of that customer. As early as December 2017, we concluded our first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. More contracts are in place, and interest in the market is continuing to grow significantly.

Aren’t print shops skeptical? Many are still coming to terms with click-charge models, which are now used as standard in digital printing.

There is a disadvantage to the click-charge models commonly found on the market. They reflect the market prices of digital printing press suppliers and are not based on the customer’s actual cost per printed page for offset printing. There are also no benchmarks for productivity targets etc. In our model, we bill per printed page using the ‘impression charge’.

What is an ‘impression charge’? 

The price per page reflects the potential of increased utilization during the contract period. However, the customer has to have a successful business model that allows for sustainable growth. Our subscription model is quite simply a genuine performance partnership. If Heidelberg fails to boost productivity during the contract period, neither the customer or we can fully satisfy margin targets. That is the difference to click-charge models.

The normal click charges for digital printing are based on the costs incurred by the digital press manufacturer and its profit expectations, not on the comparative costs for the customer. They represent a product-based pricing that the customer, the print shop, cannot control and that does not reflect their actual cost structure. Digital printing is therefore not a digital business model.

Added to this is the fact that if utilization fluctuates or is insufficient, click charges can quickly have disastrous effects.

So what is key for developing billing models based on customer needs?

Print shops want to be able to manage their costs themselves. And with good reason, as for many centuries printing was a skilled trade with humans controlling the quality of the work. Only recently has the business started to be industrialized following the automation of production processes with the help of standards. For a craftsman, what’s important is focusing on customer proximity and creating a bespoke end product with a special touch. Accordingly, print results sometimes varied dramatically in terms of quality and price.

 

An introductory explanation on Heidelberg Subscription.

 


 

What are the benefits?

What does industrial production do differently to craftsmen?

Industrial production based on standards creates results that are largely consistent. Only the level of automation creates differences in production, and defines the print outcome and the operating result.

To stand out, print shops must therefore make substantial investments in their own, increasingly digital customer relationships. Digital marketing, an online presence and digitizing the process of ordering best-selling products are becoming very important. Investing in the pressroom may be an age-old tradition but it opens up few opportunities to stand out. It also distracts from the actual job of a printing company in the digital age – namely to attract customers. With this in mind, switching to a subscription model is an easy and entirely logical decision.

What does results-based payment entail?

Our experienced performance-focused consultants conduct a comprehensive analysis of the print shop, reviewing costs for personnel, consumables, downtimes, plate changes, waste, depreciation, and much more. Once this thorough analysis has been completed, a unit page price can be determined that is specific to the relevant customer.

What’s more, we use the performance data we have gathered from more than ten thousand networked machines to establish reference variables. Thanks to this database we can make an offer to the customer to lower this price through a subscription contract because we know how to optimize their operations.

What criteria apply for the subscription?  

Heidelberg Subscription is based on the following considerations/criteria:

  1. Customers must demonstrate growth potential in terms of overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). For most customers, this averages between 30 % and 40 %.
  2. Concentrating on product innovations and customer acquisitions, customers must aim to significantly boost order volumes.

Suitable customers are offered an attractive price based on the above considerations and on a specific expected OEE increase, e.g. from 35 % to 45 %. Using this model, we sell productivity gains and help customers to achieve and exceed their goals. Heidelberg is responsible for setting up the turnkey system accordingly. We promise customers that the price premium for our optimized and more productive turnkey system will not only be worth it, but will out-do their expectations.

How do potential customers react to this new approach?

Many customers are enthusiastic as they are not dealing with a supplier that demands money up front for better quality and even charges for servicing if a machine breaks down. Instead, Heidelberg does everything it can to exceed agreed performance targets and ensure quality matches customer expectations.

Is Heidelberg taking a risk by standing as guarantor for success? 

Yes and no. Yes because with the subscription contract, it is in our own interest to ensure machinery is running, software updates are carried out, the use of consumables is optimized, and to do everything we can to increase output. No because ultimately, we take care in choosing our subscription customers. Most importantly, customers must all have one thing in common – they need to concentrate on growth and product innovation on the market, and their business model must demonstrate the potential for further growth.

Analyzing such factors has always been important for us as a manufacturer. We want to grow alongside our successful customers. In the traditional business, this took a back seat provided the customer could pay for the equipment. What we are talking about here is an excellent, new dimension to the partnership. We are no longer looking at whether our machinery, services or materials are cheaper or more expensive than rival products. Everything is defined by the mutually agreed performance targets, using the calculated price per page as a guideline.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Another important aspect of the subscription model is based on autonomous printing following the Push to Stop principle presented at drupa 2016. – See our ValueCheck and case report.


 

Invoicing method

How do you determine the costs with a subscription contract?

That is tailored to the customer and their potential. For customers wishing to expand their business, for example, we might recommend our Speedmaster XL 106. Customers then make an upfront payment, which is only a small portion of the overall cost that would have been due if they had purchased the machinery. They also pay a fixed monthly charge based specifically on the price per page calculation of the agreed page volume that the customer aims to print and that is lower than their average page production. Additional impression charges are only incurred if the page volume exceeds the agreed targets.

Is the subscription tailored to the customer?

A fundamental and unique element to our offer is that we can customize the subscription in its entirety. For example, for companies unable to greatly increase productivity because excellent industrial systems already ensure a high OEE, we adjust the upfront payment and the fixed monthly charge accordingly. Alternatively, for customers with significant potential to increase performance and dynamic opportunities to increase order volume, we focus more on the variability of the payments.

With our subscription program, customers no longer need to worry about investing in their pressroom, making full use of available technology, or keeping systems up to date.

Why should customers tie themselves exclusively to Heidelberg?

If customers opt for the conventional model, they are dependent on a much bigger group of partners. Buying machinery takes up a large part of investment and often means being dependent on a bank. The supposed freedom that comes with pulling together consumables and optimizing the various features themselves comes with greater outlay, and all the separate relationships with numerous suppliers are diametrically opposed to the print shops’ profit targets…

…so that means the classic method of gathering lots of offers before purchasing brings its own problems? 

Everyone tries to pass on their costs. If we focus on the actual purpose of printing on paper, I believe all these dependencies are a much bigger issue than signing up to a long-term subscription contract with one manufacturer in which the profit interests of the manufacturer and customer are aligned for the first time. A Heidelberg Subscription contract runs for five years. We anticipate continuous OEE growth within that period. For example, if we increase page volume from 35 million pages per year to 55 million pages, this corresponds to OEE growth from approximately 35 % to 60 %. There is no need to explain what this means for the customer’s profits.

Is Heidelberg therefore financing the manufacturing costs for the production equipment?

The equipment belongs to Heidelberg and forms part of our balance sheet and/or our financing partners’ balance sheets. On the one hand, this fits in with the expectations of those customers who are undergoing digital transformation, i.e. the move toward an automated printing operation and digital customer relationships. Subscription customers always enjoy the highest possible level of automation without having to worry about technology updates, or financing new investments.

On the other hand, such customers also want to use digitization to bolster relationships with their own customers. Digital expertise helps to significantly improve go-to-market capacity across a broad spectrum.

 

subscribe1


 

How go-to-market is changing

Does this mean the subscription model also helps improve customers’ go-to-market capacity because it frees up resources at the print shop?

Every new print shop development until now has required enormous effort to ensure the technology is sound but also to secure prices that reflect more complex and thus more effective products. Placing a unilateral focus on production and ignoring customer value in digital customer relationships will come back to haunt even extremely successful modern printing companies.

Devoting resources to further develop the customer journey offered by the print shop and not getting bogged down by technical and administrative aspects is the best way of standing out from competitors and keeping ahead of the curve.

In other words, you are shifting your customers’ business focus?

Our high-growth customers are all excellent entrepreneurs who always focus on where the money flows so as to protect their investments. Customer orientation is greatly enhanced if we no longer force them to buy and maintain capital-intensive production equipment. Focusing completely on the customer as a core concept of the digital economy is always the best way forward for a prosperous business. That applies both to us and our customers.

With the subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of the financing. Do you anticipate any new challenges as a result?

A listed company with experience in customer financing such as Heidelberg cannot help but adopt new approaches in terms of financing. We even have a banking license. What works best for our investors is always cash-stable contracts with selected customers that have good potential for growth and are highly innovative.

That’s exactly what our subscription program ensures with its guaranteed monthly payments – particularly given that we can pool contracts and also trade through a financing partner. This is a much more attractive option for investors than having to negotiate contracts with individual print shops. Risks are balanced thanks to a diversified base of carefully assessed and chosen subscribers.

Last but not least, how quickly can you and do you want to increase market share with the subscription model?

There is very strong demand. But we are taking our time and signing contracts with selected ‘early adopters’. In this financial year, we aim to conclude ten contracts to gain experience and lay a solid foundation to gradually establish the offer across the market.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

As early as December 2017, Heidelberg concluded its first comprehensive subscription contract with folding carton manufacturer FK Führter Kartonagen, which is part of the WEIG Group. Photo: Heidelberg


 

Final conclusions

How would you summarize this development?

We live in exciting times with completely new opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers. The digital economy offers entirely new mindsets for these opportunities. Ensuring the transparent use of products and services in a digital business relationship enables us to concentrate on the real source of added value…

…and what does that ultimately mean?

The transparency we provide establishes fair business relationships between those involved, but also places great responsibility on all participants in the interest of preserving their freedom. This responsibility puts the spotlight on the values of the business partners. Heidelberg values have remained constant throughout our long industrial history and play a particularly important role in our digital strategy. We have reworded the responsibility assumed by Heidelberg in its role as a printing industry partner: Listen. Inspire. Deliver. Digital business models hardly get any better than that.

Thank you for agreeing to this interview and giving a detailed insight into the hidden complexities of mastering digital transformation.

 


 

#ValueCheck – Heidelberg Subscription as a new economic system

Why the subscription model from Heidelberg is not only a logical choice, but also essential for ensuring growth with innovative ideas

STATUS QUO

  • The print production volume (PPV) is stable at approximately 410 billion euros worldwide each year.
  • Despite this, the number of print shops and print units is decreasing due to improved press performance.
  • Even as print runs shrink, OEE (overall equipment effectiveness) can be increased through the automation of industrial-scale operations.
  • Today, growth rates can be more than doubled from 30 percent to 70 percent over ten years.
  • Given that the PPV cannot be doubled, there is an inevitable and considerable decrease in the number of print units that can be sold (up to 50 percent).
  • Heidelberg therefore has to generate added value elsewhere if it is to avoid becoming dependent on crowding out competitors or snatching market shares in order to survive in a shrinking machinery market.

MEASURES

  • Heidelberg is gaining attention as an “all-in system” thanks to its extensive print know-how and its servicing database, which has been established on the basis of predictive monitoring since 2004 and focuses on the continuous analysis and improvement of installed production equipment. More than 10,000 Heidelberg presses are currently subject to continuous analysis.
  • With its subscription model, Heidelberg takes care of everything to ensure maximum use is made of installed print shop technology.

EFFECTS

  • The risk associated with innovations is not only dramatically reduced, but also more widely spread.
  • Capital-intensive investments in production equipment no longer put a financial strain on print shops. Heidelberg supports customers, pooling and implementing investments with financing partners on good terms.
  • This has immediate positive effects on our industrial-scale customers, as increased flexibility and variability of usage provides immense freedom to concentrate on optimizing the marketing of enhanced performance and accelerating print shop growth.
  • The continuous increase in utilization results in improved profitability in the short, medium and long term.
  • The subscription program opens up linear and exponential growth opportunities for both Heidelberg and its customers.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Photo: Heidelberg

 

 

About Dr. Ulrich Hermann

Dr. Ulrich Hermann has been a member of the Management Board at Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG in his role as Chief Digital Officer since November 2016. Thanks to his proven expertise in the digital transformation of businesses, Hermann was made an honorary professor at Allensbach University, Constance, Germany, in August 2017.

Born 1966 in Cologne, he earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at RWTH in Aachen and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge, United States.

In 1996, he completed a doctorate in business economics at the University of St. Gallen, in 1998 he became the Managing Director of Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG, and in 2002 he was appointed Managing Director of Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation.

In 2005, he assumed the role of Chairman of the Management Board at Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding, later becoming a Member of the Divisional Executive Board for the Central European Region at Wolters Kluwer n.v. in 2010.

 


 

About Andreas Weber, Founder and CEO of Value Communication AG: Since more than 25 years Andreas Weber serves on an international level as a business communication analyst, influencer and transformer. His activities are dedicated to the ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ via presentations, management briefings, coachings, workshops, analysis&reports, strategic advice.

 


 

ValueDialog Dr. Hermann Subscription.001

Foto: Heidelberg


„Im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen neuen, netzwerk- und plattform-basierten Ökonomiemodellen muss alles in Echtzeit passieren, transparent werden und sich der kontinuierlichen Steigerung des Kundennutzen unterordnen.“ — Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann


 

Interview und Analyse von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English Version

Erfolg im Print kommt nicht von alleine. Sondern nur durch neues Denken und Handeln! So kann man auf einen Nenner bringen, worum es Chief Digital Officer Prof. h. c. Dr. Ulrich Hermann, seit November 2016 Mitglied im Vorstand der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, bei seiner Arbeit geht. Im Exklusiv-Gespräch erklärt er die Prinzipien der ‚Subscription Economy‘, die bei Heidelberg nunmehr fest etabliert wird und aus dem Stand heraus Erfolge zeigen soll.

 


 

Hinweis: Im April 2018 erschienen weitere Neuigkeiten und Kommentare zu Heidelbergs Subscription Modell, zum Beispiel im Handelsblatt. “Der Verkauf von Druckmaschinen ist nicht mehr das Hauptgeschäft.”

Auch neue Kunden wurden vorgestellt, wie die Klampfer Group in Österreich oder die Lensing Druck Group in Deutschland.


 

Dies führt Heidelberg als Branchenprimus und seine vorwiegend industriell ausgerichteten Kunden auf das nächste Level der Transformation. Für die Print-Branche ist das ein Novum und eine Herausforderung zugleich, da die Leistungen von Druckereien erstmals individuell bewertet und abgerechnet werden. Die üblichen Abrechnungswege durch Verkauf von Equipment zu Festpreisen im Offsetdruck oder Click-Charge-Modelle im Digitaldruck werden durch Subscription überholt. Das bietet Vorteile.

 


subscribe concepts with message on keyboard

Info-Box: Was bedeutet ‚Subscription‘?

Die Subscription Economy korreliert mit dem fundamentalen Wandel eines auf Individualisierung ausgerichtetem Kauf- und Verbraucherverhalten im B2C wie immer stärker auch im B2B. Langfristige und flexible Kundenbeziehungen und der kontinuierliche Kundennutzen stehen im Fokus, nicht mehr der Erwerb und Besitz von Produkten. Die resultierenden technischen und organisatorischen Anforderungen sind hoch. In der Druckbranche sind solche Lösungen partiell schon bekannt durch singuläre Software-as-a-Service-Lösungen. Wichtige Parameter sind Automatisierung und Skalierbarkeit, komplexe Datenmodelle, veränderte Rechnungslegung bis hin zu Analytics. Von entscheidender Bedeutung ist es, kontinuierlich Aufschluss über die Kundenzufriedenheit und v.a. die Art und Weise der Nutzung von Produkten oder Services zu erhalten, da sie es Unternehmen erlauben, die Dienste individueller zu gestalten, um Wachstum für Lieferant und Kunde gleichermaßen zu ermöglichen. Studien belegen, dass in den USA als dem Mutterland der Digitalisierung die Subscription Economy schon weit entwickelt ist und in den letzten 10 Jahren bereits rund 800 Milliarden US-Dollar an Wertschöpfung erzielte. —aw


 

Worum es geht

Die Subskriptions-Ökonomie könnte auch in unserer Branche das große Thema werden — in den USA bereits wirtschaftlich extrem erfolgreich, bei uns bis dato noch kaum beachtet. Was ändert sich dadurch?

Dr. Ulrich Hermann: Der Begriff ‚Subscription‘ steht für ein neues Modell der Wertschöpfung durch konsequente Nutzen-Zentrierung. Es bedeutet primär das Ende der produktzentrischen Orientierung von Firmen, die ihre Wertschöpfung nicht am Nutzen des Kunden ausmacht, sondern aus dem Produktentstehungsprozess ableitet.

In dieser am Produkt und seiner Vermarktung ausgerichteten analogen Welt ist das Unternehmen bestrebt, so bald wie möglich den Aufwand, den sie für Entwicklung, Produktion, Vertrieb und Bereitstellung hatte, an die Kunden weiter zu berechnen. Ob die Kunden auf ihre Kosten kommen ist hier nur eine Frage, die für den Wiederhol-Kauf relevant ist. Also vertagt wird.

Worauf kommt es also bei ‚Subscription‘ speziell drauf an?

Es kommt auf eine dauerhafte Kundenbeziehung an; diese entsteht sicher für Service-Dienstleitungen „um das Produkt herum“, nicht aber für den eigentlichen Produktwert. Produktzentrierung passte bestens in die analoge Welt und prägte über 100 Jahre das Industriezeitalter, weil die Nutzung und die damit einhergehende Wertschöpfung beim Kunden eben nur schwer messbar waren.

In einer Digitalökonomie ist das nicht mehr zeitgemäß, da hier über die Nutzungsdaten verfügt und durch neue Geschäftsmodelle der Nutzwert, nicht der Produktwert in den Vordergrund gestellt wird. Dies wollen und können wir bei Heidelberg als erster Anbieter für Druckereien gezielt im Markt etablieren.

Worin liegen die Vorteile von Nutzen-Zentrierung bzw. die Nachteile der Produktzentrierung?

Wie gesagt, im Digitalzeitalter mit seinen Plattformen können Anbieter Daten aller Akteure sammeln, profilieren und analysieren mit dem Ziel, den Kundennutzen nachhaltig und dauerhaft zu erhöhen und damit werthaltige Loyalitäten beim Kunden zu schaffen. Folglich muss alles Handeln sich daran orientieren und für alle Beteiligten in Echtzeit transparent sein. Durch die Produktzentrierung geht verloren, umfassend und zeitnah zu wissen, was Kunden mit dem Produkt wann genau wie machen. Ein Momentum, das übrigens querbeet viele Arbeits- und Lebensbereiche betrifft…

… können Sie Beispiele nennen?

Es fängt beim Lesen eines Buches oder Magazins an, oder damit, wann Kunden Produktionsmittel an- und ausschalten, warum sie im Auto sitzen und wohin sie fahren. Der Hersteller/Lieferant weiß darüber in der Regel nichts über die Produktverwendung. Die Folge ist, dass mit hohem Aufwand durch Befragungen und Analysen eine Antizipation der Nutzung erfolgen muss, um in langen Zyklen recht mühselig Verbesserungen vornehmen zu können.

Innovationen unterlagen in der analogen Zeit daher längeren und wegen der damit verbundenen Risiken in der Regel schrittweisen Innovationszyklen, was zur Folge hatte, dass der Anteil der Zeit, mit der sich analoge Firmen um die Optimierung der internen Wertschöpfung bemühen, unverhältnismäßig hoch war. Es ist nur offensichtlich, dass in dieser Welt auch der Preis nicht die Nutzung des Produktes durch den Kunden reflektiert, sondern eher der Deckung von Material und Produktionsaufwand.

 

 

 

 

Ein Meilenstein auf dem Weg, die digitale Transformation und letztlich das Subscription-Programm realisieren zu können: Die Markteinführung des Heidelberg Assistant im Dezember 2017, die Dr. Ulrich Hermann persönlich per Youtube-Video erläuterte.

 


 

Worauf es ankommt

Wie geht die Umstellung auf Nutzen-Orientierung von statten?

Wenn man den Aspekt rund um das Nutzen-Stiften als Kerngedanken ins Zentrum der Betriebswirtschaft einer Firma stellt, kommt man zu völlig anderen Vorgehensweisen. Man will wissen, wofür zahlt mein Kunde, während er die zur Verfügung gestellten Produkte nutzt. Disruptive Geschäftsmodelle der digitalen Welt bauen exakt darauf auf: Das Nutzungsverhalten wird zum Maß aller Dinge — getragen durch die User Experience und die Customer Journey.

Wird das in der Print-Branche auch schon richtig verstanden? Schließlich reden fast alle mittlerweile über Kundenorientierung.

Unterschätzt wird von Technik-Anbieter-Seite aus oftmals, dass allein die Kundenzentrierung als Vorbedingung der Nutzen-Orientierung eine umfassende Transformation der Organisation erfordert. Von der Denkweise und Kultur bis zur Produktentstehung, alles verändert sich. Die digitale Messbarkeit der Nutzung von Produkten und Services rückt in den Mittelpunkt der Wertschöpfung. Sämtliche Geschäftsaktivitäten müssen darauf abgestimmt sein.

Valide, langfristig erhobene Datenanalysen bei installierten Maschinen und Systemen helfen dabei Benchmarks mit Vergleichsgruppen aufzubauen, damit Ziel- und Führungsgrößen für die optimale Nutzung abzuleiten. Solche Daten erheben wir bei Heidelberg seit der Einführung der Remote Service-Technologie bereits seit dem Jahr 2004 und sind für uns die Basis für die Einführung von Subscription.

Bezogen auf die Print-Industrie heißt das: Es genügt also nicht, digitale Prozesse und Verfahren nur in die Fertigung von Print-Produkten einfließen zu lassen?

Genau. In der digitalen Ökonomie dreht sich der Wettbewerb nicht ums Produkt, sondern vor allem um die Ausgestaltung des relevanten Nutzererlebnisses — im neudeutschen eben „User-Experience“ genannt. Ich zeige gerne ein Bild, dass das Straßengeschehen von Manhattan als Herzstück von New York City zeigt. Bis vor 10 Jahren war es noch geprägt von den Taxis, den Yellow Cabs; heute von dunklen Limousinen.

Das eigentliche Produkt ist vergleichbar, nur eben schwarz und nicht gelb: Ein Auto mit Fahrer und Fahrgast eben — und von außen betrachtet nicht auf Anhieb als digitales Produkt erkennbar. Der Unterschied liegt aber im Nutzen-Erlebnis: Es ist viel einfacher mit Uber ein Taxi zu bestellen, auszuwählen, zu bezahlen, zu fahren und mit Bewertungen die Qualität des Geschäftsmodelles selbst zu beeinflussen.

Als Fahrgast fühlt man sich ernstgenommen, irgendwie als Partner, nicht als Gefangener hinter einer Plexiglasscheibe. Es geht also nicht mehr um das reine Leistungs- oder Produktangebot, sondern um die Customer Journey und die neue, smarte Art der Produktnutzung.

Was heißt das konkret, bezogen auf Heidelberg und seine Kunden?

Die Subscription-Economy bietet in unserem Kontext die Chance, darüber nachzudenken, wie wir unser Geschäft grundlegend verändern müssen. Indem wir nicht mehr nur Maschinen und Services verkaufen, also den Produktwert abrechnen, sondern neue Modelle finden, die Nutzung und die daraus resultierenden positiven Effekte zu bewerten.

 

 

Auch im Marketing geht Heidelberg neue Wege. Wie der Image-Film zu Heidelberg Subscription zeigt.

 


 

Wie es funktioniert

Wie muss man sich Subscription bei Heidelberg im Detail vorstellen?

Vor über einem Jahr haben wir einen Veränderungs-Prozess angestoßen. Wir haben uns zuerst folgende Fragen gestellt. Worin liegt das größte Gewinnpotential für unseren Kunden? Aus dem Besitz von günstiger Druckkapazität oder aus seiner optimalen Auslastung? Wenn unsere Kunden erst Mehrwert aus der maximalen Maschinenauslastung, oder anders ausgedrückt: der optimierten Nutzung einer abgestimmten Kombination aus einer Vielzahl von Einzelprodukten, wie Maschine, Verbrauchsgüter, Service und Software ziehen, warum soll der Kunde uns nicht genau erst für diesen Mehrwert zahlen und nicht bereits schon für die Einzelkomponenten?

Und wie sie sind Sie vorgegangen, um auf diese zentralen Fragen Antworten zu finden?

Aus verschiedensten Disziplinen wie Finanzierung, Service, Produktentwicklung, Vertrieb, Marketing/Produktmarketing wurde ein Team gebildet, um ein Geschäftsmodell zu finden, in dem Heidelberg nicht die Einzelprodukte dem Kunden verkauft, sondern die Nutzung eines auf den individuellen Kunden optimierten Gesamtsystems anbietet. — Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnten wir mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Weitere Abschlüsse sind in trockenen Tüchern. Und das Interesse im Markt wächst erheblich weiter.

Sind Druckereien da nicht skeptisch? Viele Drucker hadern ja auch mit den im Digitaldruck zwangsläufig üblichen Click-Charge-Modellen.

Die im Markt üblichen Click-Charge-Modelle haben einen Nachteil: Sie reflektieren die Marktpreise der Anbieter von Digitaldruckmaschinen und orientieren sich eben nicht an den wirklichen Kosten pro gedruckte Seite des Kunden seiner laufenden Offset-Printproduktion. Es gibt auch keine Benchmarks für Produktivitätsziele, und so weiter. In unserem Modell rechnen wir ebenfalls pro gedruckte Seite mit der sogenannten „Impression Charge“ ab.

Was ist unter „Impression Charge“ zu verstehen? 

Dieser Preis pro Seite reflektiert das Potential einer verbesserten Auslastung innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit, setzt aber voraus, dass der Kunde ein erfolgreiches Geschäftsmodell hat, mit dem er nachhaltig wächst. Subscription in unserem Angebot ist eben eine echte Performance-Partnerschaft. Sollte Heidelberg innerhalb der Vertragslaufzeit die Potentiale nicht heben, dann können sowohl der Kunde als auch wir nicht die volle Margenerwartung realisieren. Das ist der Unterschied zur Click Charge.

Die üblichen Digitaldruck-Click-Charges orientieren sich an den Kosten der Digitaldruckmaschinen-Hersteller und ihrer Gewinnerwartung, nicht an den Vergleichskosten des Kunden. Sie stellen ein produktorientiertes Pricing dar, das vom Kunden, der Druckerei, nicht kontrolliert werden kann und auch nicht seine tatsächliche Kostenstruktur reflektiert. Digitaldruck ist daher kein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Hinzu kommt: Ist die Auslastung schwankend oder nicht ausreichend vorhanden, werden Click-Charges schnell ruinös.

Was ist demnach entscheidend, um Kosten-Abrechnungs-Modelle kundengerecht zu gestalten?

Druckereien wollen ihre Kosten selbstbestimmt managen können. Aus gutem Grund. Der Druckbetrieb war Jahrhunderte lang stets handwerklich orientiert, mit vom Menschen kontrollierter Qualität; erst in jüngster Zeit wurde begonnen, das Geschäft durch die Automatisierung von Produktionsprozessen mithilfe von Standards zu industrialisieren. Beim Handwerker stehen das Ergebnis einer individuellen Leistung mit seiner besonderen Note sowie die Kundennähe im Fokus. Entsprechend waren Druckergebnisse bisweilen komplett unterschiedlich in Qualität und Preis.

 

 

 

Ein erstes Erklärung-Video zu Heidelberg Subscription (in englischer Sprache).

 


 

Was es bringt

Was wir durch die industrielle Produktion anders als bei ‚Handwerk‘?

Durch die industrielle Produktion auf Basis von Standards sind Ergebnisse weitgehend gleich. Nur der Grad der Automatisierung schafft noch Unterschiede durch die Produktion und definiert das drucktechnische sowie das betriebswirtschaftliche Ergebnis.

Um ihre Leistung differenzieren zu können, müssen Druckereien daher erheblich in die eigene, zunehmend digitale Kundenbeziehung investieren. Digitales Marketing, Internetpräsenz und die Digitalisierung der Bestellwege der Print-Besteller wird extrem wichtig. Das eigene Investment in den Drucksaal mag alter Tradition folgen, schafft aber kaum noch Möglichkeiten zu differenzieren und lenkt von der eigentlichen Aufgabe eines Druckunternehmers in der digitalen Zeit ab: nämlich Kunden zu gewinnen. Vor diesem Hintergrund fällt eine Umorientierung hin zu Subscription nicht nur leicht, sondern macht absolut Sinn.

Wie definiert sich eine Ergebnis-orientierte Bezahlung?

Durch eine von uns durchgeführte, umfassende Analyse des Druckbetriebes werden alle Kosten bewertet: für Personal, Verbrauchsmaterialien, Stillstandszeiten, Plattenwechsel, Makulatur, Abschreibungen und vieles mehr. Wir nutzen dazu unsere erfahrenen, auf die Performance orientierten Consultants. Am Ende lässt sich aus dieser Gesamtsicht ein für jeweiligen Betrieb tatsächlicher Herstellungs-Seitenpreis ermitteln.

Zudem nutzen wir unsere Performance Daten aus mehr als zehntausend angeschlossenen Maschinen, um Führungsgrößen zu entwickeln. Auf dieser Datenbasis können wir dann dem Kunden ein Angebot machen, diesen Preis im Rahmen eines Subskriptionsvertrages zu unterbieten, weil wir wissen, wie sich dieser Betrieb weiter optimieren lässt.

Welche Kriterien greifen für die Subscription?  

Subscription fußt bei uns auf Basis folgender Überlegung bzw. Maßgabe:

  1. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss ein Steigerungspotential seiner OEE [Overall Equipment Effectiveness] haben, die bei den allermeisten der Kunden im Schnitt zwischen 30 % und 40 % liegt.
  2. Der Heidelberg-Kunde muss signifikantes Wachstum in seinen Auftragsvolumen anstreben, weil er sich auf Produkt-Innovationen und auf Kundenakquisition konzentriert.

Kunden, die in Betracht kommen, bieten wir einen attraktiveren Preis auf Basis von Überlegungen sowie der Vorwegnahme, die OEE um definierte Werte zu steigern, beispielsweise also von 35 % auf 45 %. Wir verkaufen dadurch Produktivitätsvorteile und helfen dem Kunden dabei, diese zu erreichen bzw. zu übertreffen. Es liegt in der Verantwortung von Heidelberg, das Gesamtsystem dementsprechend einzurichten.. Wir übernehmen damit die Garantie, dass sich unser Preis-Premium für das bessere und produktivere Gesamtsystem nicht nur rechnet, sondern vom Kunden geschlagen wird.

Wie reagieren interessierte Kunden auf diesen neuen Ansatz?

Viele Kunden sind begeistert. Denn sie haben es dann mit Heidelberg als einem Lieferanten zu tun, der nicht am Anfang sein Geld für höhere Qualität verlangt und, wenn die Maschine steht, sogar noch Servicekosten berechnet, sondern der alles dafür tut, dass die Performance die vereinbarte Zielmarke übersteigt und sich die Qualität für den Kunden rechnet!

Heidelberg geht also ins Risiko bzw. wird Erfolgsgarant? 

Ja und nein. Ja, denn im Subscriptionsvertrag mit dem Kunden ist es Heidelbergs eigenes Interesse, dass die Maschine läuft, dass Software-Updates durchgeführt werden, der Einsatz von Verbrauchsmaterialien optimiert wird, und alles zu tun, um Leistungssteigerungen zu realisieren. Nein, da wir unsere Subscriptionskunden schließlich als Partner sorgfältig auswählen. Die Kunden müssen vor allem eines gemeinsam haben: Ihr unternehmerischer Fokus gilt dem Wachstum und der Produktinnovation im Markt und ihr Geschäftsmodell zeigt, dass Sie weiter wachsen können.

Diese Analyse war ja schon immer wichtig für uns als Hersteller. So wollen wir ja mit den erfolgreichen Kunden mitwachsen. Das stand aber im traditionellen Geschäft nicht im Vordergrund, sofern der Kunde die Maschine bezahlen kann! Wir sprechen hier über eine exzellente, neue Dimension der Partnerschaft. Wir diskutieren dabei nicht mehr, ob unsere Maschinen, Services oder Materialien günstiger oder teurer sind als beim Wettbewerb. Alles regelt sich über die gemeinsam festgelegten Performance-Ziele mit den errechneten Seitenpreisen als Orientierung.

 

Heidelberg Push-to-Stop PtS_Teaser_Slider_Motiv_White_IMAGE_RATIO_1_5

Ein weiteres wichtiges Element für Subscription basiert auf autonomem Drucken gemäß dem auf der drupa 2016 vorgestellten Push-to-Stop-Prinzip. — Siehe unseren ValueCheck und Praxisbericht.


 

Wie es sich rechnet

Wie legen Sie die Kosten mittels eines Subskriptions-Vertrags fest?

Das erfolgt individuell je nach Kunde und seinen Möglichkeiten. Beispielsweise kommt für den Kunden, der sein Geschäft erweitern möchte, eine Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 in Betracht. Der Kunde leistet dann eine Upfront-Zahlung, die nur einen kleineren Teil des Gesamtwertes ausmacht, den er bei Kauf hätte zahlen müssen, zzgl. eines monatlichen Fix-Betrages, der sich spezifisch nach der Seitenpreis-Berechnung des vereinbarten Seitenvolumens, das gedruckt werden soll und das unter der durchschnittlichen Seitenproduktion des Kunden liegt, ergibt. Erst wenn das Seitenvolumen die vereinbarte Zielmarke überschreitet, werden zusätzliche Impression-Charges berechnet.

Passt sich das Subscription-Angebot auf die Kunden an?

Wesentlich und einzigartig ist, dass wir das Ganze äußerst individuell gestalten können. Beispielsweise wird bei einem Betrieb, der wenig Produktivitätssteigerung erwarten kann, weil seine OEE aufgrund exzellenter industrieller Fertigkeit sowieso schon hoch ist, die Upfront-Zahlung entsprechend justiert, ebenso wie der monatliche Fix-Betrag, der zu zahlen ist. Oder: Bei Kunden mit hohen Performance-Steigerungspotenzialen und dynamischen Steigerungs-Möglichkeiten beim Auftragseingang legen wir mehr Fokus auf die Variabilität der Zahlungen.

Unser Subscription-Programm befreit den Kunden von der Investitionslast im Drucksaal und der Problematik, die ihm zur Verfügung stehende Technik voll zu nutzen und selbst auf Stand zu halten.

Warum sollen sich Kunden ausschließlich an Heidelberg binden?

Wenn sich ein Kunde für das konventionelle Modell entscheidet, steht er in weit aus komplexeren Abhängigkeiten. Mit dem Kauf der Maschine legt er sich für einen großen Teil des Investments fest und steht häufig in Abhängigkeit von der Bank. Der vermeintlichen Freiheit, Verbrauchsgüter selbst zusammenzustellen und die insgesamt angebotenen Features selbst zu optimieren, stehen immer höhere Aufwände gegenüber und die gesamten Einzelbeziehungen mit den Lieferanten stehen den Gewinnzielen des Druckbetriebes diametral entgegen…

… das heisst doch, dass der klassische Weg der Anschaffung im Konzert mit vielen Anbieten Probleme bringt, oder? 

Jeder versucht, die Kosten auf den anderen abzuwälzen. Ich halte hier die Abhängigkeiten mit Blick auf den eigentlichen Zweck, ein Papier zu bedrucken, in Summe für erheblich grösser als einen langfristigen Subscriptions-Vertrag mit einem Hersteller einzugehen, in dem erstmalig Gewinninteressen gleichgeschaltet sind. Ein Heidelberg Subscription-Vertrag wird auf eine Laufzeit von fünf Jahren ausgelegt. Innerhalb der Laufzeit gehen wir stets immer von Zuwächsen bei der OEE aus. Zum Beispiel: Steigern wir das Seitenvolumen von 35 Mio. Seiten pro Jahr auf 55 Mio., entspricht das einem OEE-Zuwachs von rund 35 % auf 60%. Was das für den Gewinn des Kunden bedeutet, erschließt sich von selbst.

Heidelberg übernimmt damit die Finanzierung der Herstellkosten für die Produktionsmittel?

Das Equipment gehört Heidelberg und ist in unserer Bilanz bzw. der unserer Finanzierungspartner enthalten. Das deckt sich mit den Vorstellungen derjenigen Kunden von uns, die zum einen ihrerseits die digitale Transformation, sprich die Wende zur automatisierten Druckfabrik und zur digitalen Kundenbeziehung, bewerkstelligen. Unser Subscription-Modell beinhaltet, stets den höchst erreichbaren Automatisierungsgrad beizubehalten, ohne sich um Technik-Updates, Neuinvestitionen und deren Finanzierung kümmern zu müssen.

Zum anderen wollen diese Kunden ihre Kundenbeziehungen ebenfalls durch die Digitalisierung stärken. Die Go-to-Market-Befähigung wird durch digitale Kompetenzen auf breiter Ebene extrem aufgewertet.

 

subscribe1


 

Wie sich das Go-to-Market verändert

Das heißt, ein wesentlicher ‚Neben’-Effekt der Subscription liegt darin, die Go-to-Market-Befähigung ihrer Kunden zu beflügeln, weil Ressourcen bei Druckereien frei werden?

Jede Neuerung, die Druckereien vornehmen, erfordert bis dato ungeheure Anstrengungen. Nicht nur, um dies technisch solide zu gestalten, sondern vor allem um Preise durchzusetzen, wenn Produkte aufwändiger und damit noch wirkungsvoller werden sollen. Die einseitige Konzentration des Druckbetriebes auf die Produktion und die Vernachlässigung des Kundenwertes in einer digitalen Kundenbeziehung rächt sich auch für die heute noch extrem erfolgreichen Betriebe.

Seine Ressourcen auf die  Weiterentwicklung der vom Druckbetrieb dargebotenen Customer Journey zu konzentrieren und sich nicht mehr im Technischen oder Administrativen zu verlieren, ist der beste Weg, immer auf der Höhe der Zeit sein zu können, um sich Wettbewerbsvorteile zu sichern.

Mit anderen Worten, Sie verschieben also den Geschäftsfokus Ihrer Kunden?

Unsere wachstumsstarken Kunden sind alles exzellente Unternehmer, deren Fokus immer dort ist, wo Geld fließt, um ihre Investitionen zu schützen. Wenn wir sie nicht mehr zwingen, sich vor allem mit dem Kauf und der Pflege von kapitalintensiven Produktionsmitteln beschäftigen zu müssen, profitiert die Kundenorientierung ganz erheblich. Der absolute Kundenfokus als Kernelement der digitalen Ökonomie ist immer das beste Prinzip für prosperierendes Geschäft. Das gilt für uns genauso wie für unsere Kunden.

Bei Subscription übernimmt Heidelberg die Finanzierung. Stellt Sie das vor neue, schwierige Herausforderungen?

Ein börsennotiertes und in Fragen der Kundenfinanzierung erfahrenes Unternehmen wie Heidelberg ist prädestiniert für neue Wege bei der Finanzierung. Wir haben sogar eine Banklizenz. Das Beste für unsere Investoren sind immer Cash-stabile Verträge mit ausgewählten, wachstumsfähigen und innovationsstarken Kunden.

Dies stellen wir beim Subscription-Programm mit seinen garantierten monatlichen Zahlungen sicher. Zumal wir die Verträge bündeln und außerhalb über einen Finanzpartner „traden“ können. Das ist für Geldgeber viel attraktiver als mit einzelnen Druckbetreiben Abschlüsse verhandeln zu müssen. Wir bieten durch die gründliche Selektion und Bewertung ein ausgeglichenes Risiko durch eine breitgestreute Subskriptionsbasis.

Zu guter letzt: Wie schnell wollen und können Sie mit Subscription im Markt wachsen?

Die Nachfrage ist sehr groß. Wir lassen uns aber Zeit, nehmen ausgewählte ‚Early Adopters‘ unter Vertrag. Dieses Geschäftsjahr wollen wir mit 10 Verträgen Erfahrungen sammeln und ein solides Fundament legen, um das Angebot allmählich breit im Markt zu verankern.

 

Heideldruck 01_180206_Kunde_Weig

Bereits im Dezember 2017 konnte Heidelberg mit dem Faltschachtel-Hersteller FK Führter Kartonagen aus der WEIG-Unternehmensgruppe den ersten umfangreichen Subskriptionsvertrag abschließen. Foto: Heidelberg


 

Auf den Punkt gebracht

Wie lautet Ihr Fazit?

Wir leben in einer spannenden Zeit mit völlig neuen Chancen für uns und unsere Kunden. Die Digitalökonomie bietet hierfür völlig neue Denkmuster. Die Transparenz der Nutzung des Leistungsangebotes in der digitalen Geschäftsbeziehung führt zur Konzentration auf das wirklich Wertschöpfende…

… und das heisst letztlich?

Die Transparenz, die wir ermöglichen, führt zu einer fairen Geschäftsbeziehung der Akteure —  aber verlangt auch nach einer hohen Verantwortung aller Akteure, letztlich zum Schutz ihrer Freiheiten. Mit der Verantwortung rückt das Wertesystem der Geschäftspartner mehr in den Vordergrund. In unserer digitalen Strategie nimmt das Wertesystem von Heidelberg eine besonders starke Rolle ein und ist die eigentliche Konstante in unserer langen Industriegeschichte. Wir haben diese Verantwortung für Heidelberg als Partner der Druckindustrie neu formuliert mit: Zuhören, Inspirieren und Liefern. Es gibt fast keine bessere Wertebasis für ein digitales Geschäftsmodell.

Danke für das Gespräch, das sehr aufschlussreich ist und zeigt, welche Komplexität dahinter steckt, den digitalen Wandel zu meistern.

 


Nachtrag

Print ist SPITZE! Und führend bei Industrie 4.0. — Sehenswerter Filmbeitrag vom #swr im Rahmen der Sendereihe “Made in Südwest” vom 26.4.2018 über Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG beleuchtet eindrücklich, was in der Traditionsbranche Drucken heute auf Welt-Niveau möglich ist. — “Einfach mal die Augen aufmachen und hingucken! Es wird weiter gedruckt werden.” Markus Zielbauer, Produktionsmeister bei Heidelberg, Halle 6 (Speedmaster) 

https://youtu.be/l-si95E5seQ


#ValueCheck: Heidelberg Subscription als neues Ökonomie-System

Warum das Subskriptions-Modell von Heidelberg nicht nur Sinn macht sondern eine kluge Notwendigkeit darstellt, um Wachstum durch Innovation sicherzustellen

STATUS QUO

  • Das Print-Produktions-Volumen (PPV) bleibt stabil mit rund 410 Milliarden Euro weltweit pro Jahr.
  • Die Zahl der Druckereien nimmt aber ab, ebenso wie die Zahl der Druckwerke in den Betrieben („Print-Units“) aufgrund von besseren Maschinenleistungen.
  • Die OEE (Overall-Equipment-Effectiveness) kann selbst bei kleiner werdenden Druckauflagenhöhen durch Automatisierung bei industriell ausgerichteten Betrieben gesteigert werden.
  • Steigerungsraten können von heute 30% auf 70% in 10 Jahren mehr als verdoppelt werden
  • Da sich das PPV nicht verdoppeln wird, sinkt zwangsläufig die Zahl der verkaufbaren Druckwerke deutlich (bis zu 50%).
  • Die Wertschöpfung muss sich also bei Heidelberg verlagern, um nicht in einem kleiner werdenden Maschinenmarkt nur noch durch Verdrängung oder durch Marktanteile-Abjagen vom Wettbewerb überlebensfähig zu sein.

MASSNAHMEN

  • In den Fokus rückt Heidelberg als ‚Gesamtsystem‘ mit seiner umfassenden Print-Kompetenz und der seit 2004 durch Predictive Monitoring für den Service aufgebauten Datenbasis bezüglich der konstanten Analyse und Verbesserung der installierten Produktionsmittel. Derzeit über zehntausend Heidelberg-Druckmaschinen werden konstant analysiert.
  • Heidelberg kümmert sich beim Subskriptionsmodell vollständig um die optimale Nutzung der installierten Technik in der Druckerei.

EFFEKTE

  • Das Risiko für Innovationen wird nicht nur drastisch gesenkt, sondern verteilt.
  • Kapitalintensive Investitionen in Produktionsmittel belasten nicht mehr die Bilanzen der Druckereien, sondern die Kunden werden von Heidelberg unterstützt bzw. die Investitionen gebündelt zu guten Konditionen mit Finanzpartnern umgesetzt.
  • Dies hat unmittelbar positive Auswirkungen auf industriell ausgerichtete Heidelberg-Kunden, da das Mehr an Flexibilität und die Nutzungsvariabilität enormen Freiraum bieten, um sich optimal auf die Vermarktung der gesteigerten Leistung zu fokussieren und das Wachstum der Druckerei zu beschleunigen.
  • In der konstanten Nutzungssteigerung liegt kurz-, mittel und langfristig die Steigerung der Profitabilität.
  • Durch das Subscription-Programm bieten sich für Heidelberg und seine Kunden nicht nur lineare, sondern exponentielle Wachstumsmöglichkeiten.

 


 

lossenfotografie-industriefotografie-0011

Foto: Heidelberg

 

Zur Person

Seit November 2016 ist Prof. h. c.  Dr. Ulrich Hermann Mitglied des Vorstands der Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG und gleichzeitig Chief Digital Officer. Im August 2017 wurde er als ausgewiesener Experte im Bereich der digitalen Transformation von Unternehmen von der Allensbach Hochschule Konstanz zum Honorarprofessor berufen.

1966 in Köln geboren, studierte er an der RWTH, Aachen und am Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.I.T., Cambridge U.S.A. und schloss als Diplom-Ingenieur Maschinenbau ab.

1996 erfolgte die Promotion an der Hochschule St. Gallen im Bereich Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 1998  wurde er zum Geschäftsführer Bertelsmann Springer Science and Business Media Schweiz AG und 2002  zum Geschäftsführer Süddeutscher Verlag Hüthig Fachinformation ernannt.

2005 übernahm er den Vorsitz der Geschäftsführung Wolters Kluwer Germany Holding und wurde 2010 Bereichsvorstand der Wolters Kluwer N. V. Region Central Europe.

 


 

Über den Autor: Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice.

 


 

%d bloggers like this: