Advertisements

Archive

Tag Archives: Alexander Schlaubitz

 

ValueCheck Lufthansa 2018.001

Photos: Lufthansa

 

By Andreas Weber, Head of Value | German Version

Note: As a teenager, I made my first flight experience with Lufthansa. That was great! Over the next 45 years, I have had some ‘Ups & Downs’ with the Kranich Airline (also a few years as a premium customer with Lufthansa Senator status). — I watch relevant news as an analyst always highly interested.

With a big bang, millions in advertising revenue and full of fervor, Lufthansa is re-branding itself. At the heart of this is an elaborate re-design – above all the crane as its symbol – which according to estimates has taken at least seven years to be fully implemented.

According to Group CEO Carsten Spohr, the new brand world is the icing on the cake of modernization, he says with pride and joy. It works. Experts are not tired of holding forth about all the design aspects of the new brand identity. [The newspaper HORIZONT provides an overview].

However, the news channel n-tv rightly noted, with the help of media expert Thomas Koch, that whether the redesign will actually bring in new customers and give the business wings is debatable. According to Koch, it’s the customer who decides on the performance [quality] of the offer. A redesigned logo as a trademark is more incidental. 

Lufthansa’s head of marketing, Alexander Schlaubitz, emphasizes that it is about more than that [or even about everything!] As his Group CEO has said, Lufthansa needs modernizing. For corporate marketing, this means doing away with anything which cannot be optimally digitized in order to do justice to the digital transformation and mobile communication, right down to the last pixel. [See interview by Fabian Wurm].

 


Kranich vorher nachher 58181-detail

Photo: The Lufthansa logo since 1990.


 

This was actually something that the godfather of the design, Otl Aicher, had his eye on at the start of the 1960s when he created the crane as the trademark as part of a comprehensive CI. But his demand for clarity, conciseness and simplicity ruffled a few feathers at the time, and compromises had to be made in the tradition. Surprisingly, now, almost 60 years later, the results that have been reached hark back to Aicher’s original intentions. [Note: I became aware of this first-hand because I personally spent a few years working closely with Aicher on his Rotis typeface project and he often spoke of Lufthansa and other clients.]

NOTE: A great review of Lufthansa’s design was already published February 8th, 2018: Feeling Blue.


Much ado about nothing?

As is often the case, the customer’s experience of the brand is very different to how marketing assumed it would be. Lufthansa simultaneously sent out an email (presumably to all customer program members, in modified form also used as a manifesto by advertising motif), which is thought-provoking as it overdoes it with self-praise while in many staccato sentence fragments manage to forget possible customer benefits.

  • The introductory sentence starts with “We” (in terms of “We at Lufthansa” and not “We as a community”).
  • From the outset, the customer is stylized, to put it bluntly, as the “flight attendant”.
  • It is assumed that customers must follow the Lufthansa claim.
  • The advertised claim, in modern hashtag dexterity, #SayYesToTheWorld is laughably banal and implies that Lufthansa customers can best take off by being a yes-person.
  • Last but not least, the key visual in the email shows the tail fin of a plane, as if the person in question had just missed his flight…
  • And last but not least: It’s not personal! An option or even an active request for the email recipient to give immediate feedback to the modernized Lufthansa “outfit” by return is not included. What a shame. Or is it? Because this goes against the values that the digital world stands for in the social media age.
  • Note: It should be assumed that many hundreds of thousands of customers have received the email, in any case presumably significantly more than had received it at the time of the email being sent by re-branding via the media customers.

In my view, the “crassly modern” digital electronic mail-shot back-fired because it does nothing for the customers – instead it wants to create a good impression. This brings to mind unsettling experiences which, as a long-standing senator of Lufthansa, I was continually subjected to.

 


Better late than never: reverse the communication course!

If it really is about the Lufthansa brand (its self-image as being a “premium” brand) being brought into the digital age, Lufthansa’s thinking and mode of communication needs be changed radically.

In my view, these aspects should be considered:

  1. It is crucial that the innovation and technology mechanisms be made use of so that dialog or conversations with customers take place in real time, to serve the optimization of services and products so that they are aligned with the individual needs of the customer.
  2. The brand itself is no longer at the center, instead it becomes a kind of mutual vehicle for companies and customers. Mass marketing becomes customized mass marketing. If, like the majority of established brand companies, the focus is placed on brand experience, to impress customers using the hopefully strong charisma of the brand through mass penetration and thus motivate the customer to make a purchase, in the best case, costs can be covered but it is barely possible to make profit from organic growth or to achieve profit margins in double-figures.
  3. The reality is unavoidable Customers are increasingly disappointed when brands have clearly lost personal contact with them.

 


 

My take

Sometimes the stork appears like a swallow which has not yet brought the summer with it. To avoid dissatisfaction and loss of loyalty from customers, in my opinion, what is needed is not necessarily a change in brand identity but first of all a change in the mission and a change in thinking by those in charge. By acknowledging globalization, cosmopolitanism and curiosity”, a start has been made. – But at least, put the customer first! – This is all the more important since Lufthansa, according to its own statement, is starting the largest investment in advertising in the history of the company” – after the company had the best financial year in its history in 2017, with 130 million customers recorded.

Supplement

As of June 5, 2018 Lufthansa does not come from the negative headlines. An embarrassing mishap at a football World Cup spot for Russia as well as constant improvements in the redesign are already more than amazing. Sounds like intended, but not skillful. — By the way, who, as I recently observed a Lufthansa jet in the new look at the start, notes that even at low altitudes above the city with the naked eye does not recognize that its a Lufthansa airplane … It just lacks the yellow! Ouch!

Lufthansa-Logovergleich-240575-detailp

Lufthansa recently had to change the blue of its new livery because it was too dark (Photo: Lufthansa)

 


 

About the author

Andreas Weber has been working as an internationally renowned business communication analyst, coach, influencer and transformer for over 25 years. His activities focus on ‘Transformation for the Digital Age’ with lectures, management briefings, workshops, analyses & reports and strategic advice.

In his current ‘Think Paper’, Andreas Weber presents provocative thoughts on ‘Brand Experience vs. Customer Experience’. With the key questions: “What does a brand mean to a consumer? What does a consumer mean to a brand?”.

In case of interest, please send an email to receive the above-mentioned think paper: zeitenwende007{at}gmail.com

 

Advertisements
ValueCheck Lufthansa 2018.001.jpeg

Fotos: Lufthansa

Von Andreas Weber, Head of Value | English version

 

Vorbemerkung: Als Teenager machte ich meine erste Flugerfahrung mit Lufthansa. Das war toll! Im Verlauf der folgenden 45 Jahren hatte ich mit der Kranich-Airline (auch einige Jahre mit Lufthansa-Senator-Status) so manche ‘Ups & Downs’. Neuigkeiten beobachte ich als Analyst stets hochinteressiert.

 

Mit einem Big-Bang, vielen Werbemillionen und voller Inbrunst inszeniert sich Lufthansa als Marke neu. Im Kern steht ein aufwendiges Re-Design — vor allen Dingen des Kranichs als Wappenzeichen — , das nach Schätzungen mindestens sieben Jahre zur vollständigen Umsetzung in Anspruch nehmen wird.

Die neue Markenwelt sei für ihn das I-Tüpfelchen der Modernisierung, meinte Konzernchef Carsten Spohr voller Stolz und Freude. Das wirkt. Experten werden nicht müde, sich über sämtliche Designaspekte im neuen Markenauftritt auszulassen. [Die Zeitung HORIZONT lieferte einen Überblick].

Der Nachrichten-Sender n-tv bemerkte aber zurecht mit Hilfe des Media-Experten Thomas Koch: Ob das Re-Design tatsächlich neue Kunden bringe und das Geschäft beflügele, sei fraglich. Der Kunde, so Koch, entscheide nach der Leistung [und Güte] des Angebotes. Ein renoviertes Logo als Markenzeichen sei da eher beiläufig. 

Lufthansa Marketing-Chef Alexander Schlaubitz betont, dass es um mehr [oder gar alles!] gehe. Wie sein Konzernchef sagte: Die Lufthansa bedarf der Modernisierung. Für das Konzern-Marketing heisst das, sich allem zu entledigen, was nicht optimal digitalisierbar ist, um der digitalen Transformation und der mobilen Kommunikation auf den Pixel genau gerecht zu werden. [Siehe Interview von Fabian Wurm].

 

Kranich vorher nachher 58181-detail

Das Lufthansa Logo seit 1990.

 

Das hatte eigentlich schon der Design-Urvater Otl Aicher im Blick, der Anfang der 1960er Jahre den Kranich als Markenzeichen im Rahmen einer umfassenden CI neu gestaltet hat. Doch seinen Anspruch nach Klarheit, Prägnanz und Einfachheit hatte man seiner Zeit doch etwas die Federn gerupft und Kompromisse an die Tradition verlangt. Erstaunlich, dass nunmehr, fast 60 Jahre später, man zu Resultaten kommt, die vielfach auf Aichers ursprüngliche Absichten zurückgreifen. [Hinweis: Das konnte ich aus erster Hand erfahren, da ich persönlich einige Jahre mit Aicher eng an seinem Schriftenprojekt Rotis zusammen gearbeitet habe, und er oft von Lufthansa und anderen Kunden sprach.]. 

Die umfassendste Bestandsaufnahme zum Lufthansa-Design lieferte am 8. Februar 2018 der englischsprachige Beitrag “Feeling Blue“.

Viel Lärm um nichts?

Wie so oft, ist das Kundenerleben im Umgang mit der Marke ein ganz anderes, als das, was vom Marketing vorausgesetzt wird. Zeitgleich verschickte die Lufthansa ein E-Mail (wohl an alle Kundenprogramm-Mitglieder, in modifizierter Form auch als Manifest per Anzeigenmotiv verwendet), das nachdenklich macht, da es das Selbstlob überfordert und dabei in vielen Stakkato-ähnlichen Satzfetzen den möglichen Kundennutzen ziemlich ausser Acht lässt:

  • Der Einleitungssatz beginnt mit „Wir“ (i. S. v. „wir bei Lufthansa“ und nicht im Sinne von „wir als Gemeinschaft“).
  • Der Kunde wird gleich zu Beginn, spitz formuliert, als „Flug-Begleiter“ stilisiert.
  • Es wird vorausgesetzt, dass Kunden dem Anspruch von Lufthansa folgen müssen.
  • Der angepriesene Claim im modernen Hashtag-Gewandt #SayYesToTheWorld ist lächerlich banal und impliziert, dass Lufthansa-Kunden am besten abheben, in dem sie zu Ja-Sager werden.
  • Last but not least; Das Key-Visual im E-Mail zeigt die Heckflosse eines Flugzeugs — gerade so, als hätte der geneigte Reisende seinen Flug verpasst…
  • Und last but not least: Eine Möglichkeit oder gar aktive Aufforderung, sich zum modernisierten „Outfit“ der Lufthansa unmittelbar und per Reply zu äußern, erhält der E-Mail-Empfänger nicht. Schade. Oder? Denn das konterkariert die Werte, wofür das Digitale im Social Media-Zeitalter steht.
  • Anmerkung: Es ist davon auszugehen, dass viele Hunderttausende Kunden das E-Mail erhalten haben, in jedem Fall vermutlich deutlich mehr, als zum Zeitpunkt des E-Mail-Versandes vom Re-Branding über die Medien Kunde erhalten hatten.

Der „krass zeitgemäße“ digitale E-Mail-Schuss ging damit aus meiner Sicht nach hinten los, weil es dem Kunden nichts bringt, sondern Eindruck schinden will. Das ruft bei mir ungute Erfahrungen ins Gedächtnis, die ich als langjähriger Lufthansa Senator immer wieder durchmachen musste.


Besser spät als nie: Das Kommunikationsruder rumreißen!

Sollte es tatsächlich darum gehen, die Marke Lufthansa, dem Selbstverständnis nach dem „Premium“ verpflichtet, ins Digitalzeitalter zu transformieren, müssen radikale Änderungen im Denken und im Kommunikationsverhalten der Lufthansa erfolgen.

Diese Aspekte sollten aus meiner Sicht bedacht werden:

  1. Entscheidend ist, die Innovations- und Technologie-Mechanismen so auszunutzen, dass Dialoge respektive Konversationen mit Kunden in Echtzeit entstehen, um für die Perfektionierung von Services und Produkten nutzbar zu werden, die sich am individuellen Bedarf des Kunden ausrichten.
  2. Die Marke selbst steht nicht mehr im Zentrum, sie wird quasi zum gemeinsamen Vehikel von Unternehmen und Kunden. Aus Mass Marketing wird Customized Mass Marketing. Legt man wie die Mehrzahl der etablierten Markenunternehmen den Fokus auf Brand Experience, um über die möglichst starke Strahlkraft der Marke per Mass Penetration Kunden zu beeindrucken und so zum Kaufen zu bewegen, kann man im besten Falle Kosten decken, aber kaum noch profitabel organisch wachsen oder zweistellige Margen erzielen.
  3. Die Realität ist zwangsläufig: Kunden fühlen sich mehr und mehr enttäuscht, wenn Marken offensichtlich den persönlichen Kontakt zu Ihnen verloren haben.


My Take

Manchmal erscheint mir der Kranich wie eine Schwalbe, die noch keinen Sommer bringt. Um bestmöglich kundenorientiert zu sein, und damit Unzufriedenheit und Loyalitätsverlust bei Kunden zu vermeiden, bedarf es aus meiner Sicht nicht unbedingt eines veränderten Markenauftritts, sondern zunächst der Änderung des Auftrags und einer Wandlung des Denkens der Verantwortlichen. Mit dem Bekenntnis zur Globalisierung, zur Weltoffenheit und Neugierde” ist ja bei Lufthansa ein Anfang gemacht. — But at least: Customer First! — Das ist umso wichtiger, da die Lufthansa laut eigenem Bekunden dabei ist, die größte Werbeinvestition in der Geschichte des Unternehmens” zu starten — nachdem 2017 das beste Geschäftsjahr in der Unternehmensgeschichte war, und man 130 Millionen Kunden verzeichnete. Ich bin gespannt.

Nachtrag

Stand 5. Juni 2018 kommt die Lufthansa nicht aus den Negativschlagzeilen. Eine peinliche Panne bei einem Fussball-WM-Werbespot für Russland sowie ständige Nachbesserungen beim Re-Design sind schon mehr als erstaunlich. Klingt nach wie gewollt, aber nicht gekonnt. Wer übrigens, wie ich vor kurzem, einen Lufthansa-Jet im neuen Look beim Start beobachtet, stellt fest,  dass man selbst bei niedriger Flughöhe über der Stadt mit bloßem Auge gar nicht mehr erkennt, dass der Flieger von Lufthansa ist… Es fehlt halt die Prägnanz des Gelbs! Autsch!

 

Lufthansa-Logovergleich-240575-detailp

Das Blau ihrer neuen Bemalung musste die Lufthansa kürzlich zum wiederholten Male ändern, da es zu dunkel war (Foto:  Lufthansa)

 


Lesetipp

Arthur D. Rotton, VERGEIGTE WM-KAMPAGNE — Das Versagen der Lufthansa bei den Marketing-Basics. In: Horizont.net vom Mittwoch, 06. Juni 2018

Bildschirmfoto 2018-06-07 um 07.31.27

 


Über den Autor

Seit mehr als 25 Jahren engagiert sich Andreas Weber als international renommierter Business Communication Analyst, Coach, Influencer und Transformer. Seine Aktivitäten fokussieren sich auf ‚Transformation for the Digital Age’ via Vorträgen, Management Briefings, Workshops, Analysen & Reports, Strategic Advice.

In seinem aktuellen ‚Think Paper’ hat Andreas Weber provokative Gedanken zu ‚Brand Experience vs. Customer Experience’ dargelegt. Mit den zentralen Fragen: „Was bringt dem Kunden eine Marke? Was bringt eine Marke dem Kunden?“.

Bei Interesse bitte Email senden, um das o. g. Think-Paper zu erhalten:
zeitenwende007{at}gmail.com

 


 

%d bloggers like this: