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Consumers associate printed newspapers with waste, but correcting this impression doesn’t seem to be a priority for the newspaper industry.

 

Graphic Repro On-line News Review to Friday 07 October 2016

Welcome to another roundup with 28 news articles posted during the past week, plus Laurel Brunner’s latest Verdigris Blog added on Friday, entitled Newspapers and Change. In her opening paragraph Laurel states: ‘Newspaper publishers should be doing much more to counter perception that print is bad for the environment. Consumers associate printed newspapers with waste, but correcting this impression doesn’t seem to be a priority for the newspaper industry. This has to change, even though publishers may have other things on their minds like the precipitous decline in print sales.’ You can read the rest of the article by using the link in the Verdigris section below.

The latest and No 10 in the series of Wild Format Technology Guides by Sonja Angerer was added this week. Entitled The Art and Science of Very Fine Drops, it explains why Inkjet is unique amongst printing technologies, where there is no other option to print on such a wide varieties of substrates with such efficiency and ease. Enjoy it. You can download an illustrated PDF from the link in the article below.

Upcoming events that feature prominently this week include The Print Show 2016, which opens its doors at the NEC in Birmingham tomorrow. You’ll find news from several exhibitors, including Sawgrass on Tuesday, and Intec on both Thursday and Friday, with the lead article on Friday taken from Gareth Ward at the Print Business, devoted to his take on the show, now in its second year and with an increase in demand for space this time around. It’s on until Thursday 13 October and has some nice offerings.

Domino Digital Printing Solutions will showcase a range of technologies at All4pack 2016 in Paris from 14 to 17 November. The show was previously known as Emballage. On Tuesday, Martin Bailey at Global Graphics led the news, as Global announced it is to chair a new ISO task force for a new PDF production workflow standard that will make it possible to describe what a final printed piece is supposed to look like. Leading the news on Thursday: KBA Report 49 is now available either as a printed version or to download online in multiple languages from KBA using the link in the article. The theme is ‘Print is on the up once more’, as this latest issue takes a closer look at some of innovations unveiled at drupa 2016.

There’s so much more for you is you scroll down, including some nice orders and installations including Ricoh in multiple European countries including France, The Netherlands and Finland; Muller Martini in Ghana; Highcon in Germany; Heidelberg UK, Xeikon with ThermoFlexX also in the UK; IFS with Foliant in the UK, Heidelberg USA, Taopix in Germany for an online platform; and MPS in The Netherlands.

As my tailender this week is Wednesday’s lead article as UPM Raflatac partners on the reforestation project of Jaguari River in Brazil to help protect this vital ecosystem; with a stunning pic to go with it.

My main MacBook’s screen decided to pack up this morning which is rather hampering the way I usually work, so that’s all until next time. Until then. My best regards,

Mike Hilton


the-print-show-2016

Our e-News comprises:  Headline News – Online Feature Articles – the Verdigris initiative and Wild Format Technology Guides from Digital Dots, as well as our Drupa and FESPA Newsrooms which can be accessed from the Index on our Home Page. We also have News in Review, which provides a weekly overview and listing of all news added to the site. 

Headline News
Over 28,000 news items have now gone online since we launched our Website in September 2001. News for the past 24 months can still be accessed via the Home Page and its continuation news page

Mon 03 October…   
Sun Chemical in Flint Group European Ink acquisition
Sun Chemical has announced its intention to acquire Flint Group’s European Publication Gravure Ink Business…

Author Mural runs through Hachette’s Carmelite House
The new mural is a bold ‘river of authors’ representation of the River Thames that runs by
Hachette UK’s new home…

Ricoh’s continuous feed VC60000 makes its mark with IDC
High-end digital press helps Ricoh secure second spot for worldwide unit shipments in IDC’s Tracker…

MCTdigital and Blackman & White awarded at SGIA
New VersaTech2 ‘All in One’ digital cutter wins SGIA Product of the Year Award for finishing-routers/cutters…

Domino awarded in PPMA Group Industry Awards 2016
Domino’s SerialTrac named ‘Most Innovative Processing or Packaging Machine’ at the PPMA 2016 Awards…

WAEC Ghana boosts in-house finishing with Muller Martini
The West African Examinations Council invests in its first Muller Martini Primera saddle stitcher for its plant in Ghana…

Tue 04 October…   
Global Graphics chairs new ISO task force for PDF workflow
New PDF production workflow standard will make it possible to describe what a final printed piece is supposed to look like…

Xeikon X-800 5.0 with enhanced production capabilities
Xeikon has unveiled X-800 5.0 software to support faster, more effective production and colour reproduction…

Sawgrass set for a colourful Print Show UK 2016
Sawgrass to show the possibilities bright and vibrant 8-colour inks can offer at the NEC, 11 – 13 October…

Sun Chemical to debut SunTex Encore at Heimtextil 2017
Sun Chemical to present its portfolio of SunTex textile inkjet inks at Heimtextil in Frankfurt, 10 – 13 January 2017…

Sign & Digital UK from 28 – 30 March 2017
Sign & Digital UK to celebrate 30th anniversary with brand new Website and show focus for 2017 event…

Wed 05 October…   
UPM Raflatac supports Brazil Reforestation Project
UPM Raflatac partners on the reforestation project of Jaguari River in Brazil to help protect this vital ecosystem…

Gelato leads with print on location model
Print on demand is about to be joined by print on location as new businesses emerge to exploit these possibilities…

The Inkjet Revolution
This article relating to continuous feed inkjet is by Benoit Chatelard, vice president, Production Printing, Ricoh Europe…

Digital technology turns Label’Or into a winner
The Xeikon CX3 is the third Xeikon press in operation at Belgium-based label manufacturer Label’Or…

Highcon digital cutting and creasing for Colordruck
Baiersbronn in Germany says yes to digital cutting and creasing up to B1-size with a Highcon Beam order…

Thu 06 October…  
KBA Report No. 49: drupa review and practice reports
Print is on the up once more. Issue 49 of KBA Report takes a closer look at some of innovations unveiled at drupa 2016…

Domino at All4pack 2016 in Paris (previously Emballage)
Domino Digital Printing Solutions to showcase range of technologies at All4pack 2016 from 14 to 17 November…

Intec adds ‘Flare’ at The Print Show 2016 at the NEC
Intec continues its worldwide launch of finishing equipment to add premium decorative effects to digitally printed media…

Brightsea Print Group breaks through the 10m mark
Brightsea achieves over 10 million impressions in the last three months on the Speedmaster XL 75 installed this year…

Reproflex3 expands with ThermoFlexX 80-D imager
Installation of the UK’s second dual-head ThermoFlexX 80-D digital flexo plate imager expands Reproflex3′ plate services…

Agfa Fortuna 10 at Security Printers Conference in Seville
Agfa Graphics has announced the new version of Fortuna design and assembly software for high-security printing…

Fri 07 October…   
The Print Show 2016 prepares a tasty buffet
The main course may be missing from regional and national shows, says Gareth Ward, but there are plenty of morsels to sharpen any appetite for manageable investment…

Intec to unveil ColorCut 500 at The Print Show
Intec Printing Solutions to debut of the ColorCut digital die-cutter for sheet labels and packaging at the NEC next week…

Heidelberg hosts Open House at SunDance Marketing Orlando
Open House for X-Package and Prinect at SunDance showcased doubled productivity with Heidelberg’s Speedmaster CD 102…

Work win prompts Ruddocks’ Foliant laminator buy
Winning new worked prompted Lincoln, UK printer to invest in an IFS-supplied Foliant Vega 530 SF laminator…

Klartext Göttingen goes online with Taopix platform
German crossmedia directprint24.de brand has invested in a new photo commerce platform from Taopix UK…

Geostick Group adds two MPS EXL-Packaging presses
Two EXL-Packaging presses sold to Geostick B.V. in Uithoorn and Clever Labels & Flexibles in The Hague in The Netherlands…

Lead article from Friday in previous update… 

UPM Paper Asia to be renamed UPM Specialty Papers
New name highlights the business area’s strategic focus on specialty papers and global operations…

GraphicRepro.Net e-News  (ISSN 1814-2923) is sponsored and made possible by:

Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG  (Heidelberg), The world’s largest printing press manufacturer for the industry worldwide. Heidelberg customers enjoy the most comprehensive and extensive sales and service network in the industry for JDF compliant workflow, computer-to-plate, sheetfed offset, Web-to-print, digital printing, digital inkjet for labels and packaging, packaging and finishing, all with complementary consumables. Heidelberg has offices in around 170 countries. Visit the Heidelberg Website for more information.

drupa 2020 (drupa), the international flagship fair of the printing and media industry, responds to the challenges of the changing market and provides pioneering solutions for the future. This is highlighted by the new marketing and communication strategy where drupa claims its position as ‘No.1 for Print & Crossmedia Solutions’ with the slogan ‘touch the future’. The issues of ‘package printing’, ‘multichannel’, ‘green printing’, ‘3D printing’, and ‘functional printing’ will become increasingly important to the overall communication strategy. To find out more, visit the drupa 2020 Website.

Online Feature articles 2014 – 2016
Only 35 so far this year, with well over 70 last year, and over 90 in 2013 and in 2014 which can still be accessed via the Index on the Home Page, with prior years in our Archives.

Downloads 2016 Chapter 01

Technology-related Chapter 02

Online Features Sep/Oct Chapter 07

Previous…   
Model Zagreb’s robot-assisted Bobst case maker
Model Zagreb in Croatia has installed a highly automated Bobst FFG 618 – a case maker known for its shelf-ready capabilities…

Verdigris – Environmental Initiative

Laurel Brunner’s weekly Verdigris Blogs 2016

Newspapers and Change
The weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner – Fri 07 Oct

Most recent…   
Data Basis
The weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner – Fri 23 Sep

Technology Guides – from Digital Dots

Technology Guides for Wild Format 2016
This is the brand new series for 2016 – 2017 of new guides. The first ten can now be found in this special section in the Index on the Home Page of our Website. All have illustrated PDFs for downloading.

NEW this week and No 10… The Art and Science of Very Fine Drops
Inkjet is unique amongst printing technologies, there is no other option to print on such a wide varieties of substrates with such efficiency and ease. By Sonja Angerer

9… The basics of printheads
In many respects the printhead is the heart of an inkjet printer, directly responsible for placing each individual drop of ink on the substrate. By Nessan Cleary

FESPA Newsroom
The FESPA Newsroom can be found via the Index on our Home Page.

FESPA Federation News in 2016

Previous…   
10th Anniversary FESPA Mexico in September 2017
Visitors and exhibitors hail FESPA Mexico 2016 as a resounding success, with 10th Anniversary event announced for next year…

FESPA and ARED gearing up for FESPA Eurasia in December
FESPA and its Turkish Member Association ARED show commitment to the Eurasian region through local initiatives…

Drupa Newsroom
Our Drupa Newsroom with news from Messe Düsseldorf and for Drupa 2016 can be found in the Index. It is divided into the following Chapters for your convenience and ease of use… but you must scroll down to view each Chapter when you visit the Newsroom

drupa daily to download as PDFs
These eleven jam-packed drupa daily news issues are ready to read now. They contain hundreds of superb articles, interviews, features and news. You can download each one complete as a PDF…

drupa 2016 Exhibitors’ at show + post-show News
Latest additions of 86 in total are now in alphabetical order can be accessed in our drupa Newsroom.

drupa 2016 News from Exhibitors (now in alphabetical order)
The series of over 240 pre-show articles can be accessed in our drupa Newsroom in alphabetical order.

post-drupa 2016 News from Messe Düsseldorf

Decisive impulses for the global print industry at drupa
drupa 2016 was a resounding success with excellent business deals concluded in an outstanding investment climate…

drupa ante portas Blogs 2016
Includes the tenth and final article in this series from Andreas Weber in Mainz, Germany…

drupa 2016 Expert Articles – and more
Includes the eleventh and final article in this series from Claus Bolza-Schünemann, CEO and president of Koenig & Bauer (KBA) and drupa president 2016…

The Graphic Repro On-line Website is supported and sponsored by: 

Antalis South Africa, Canon SA, Screen Europe,  Drupa 2020,  Esko,  FESPA.  Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG,  HP Graphic So lutions, Kemtek Imaging Systems,  Krause-Biagosch,  Leonhard Kurz Stiftung,   Manroland Web Systems GmbH, Muller Martini AG,  Ricoh Europe,  Sappi LimitedThunderbolt Solutions, and UPM-Kymmene.

If you would like to send news for consideration for the Graphic Repro On-line Website (ISSN 1814-2915) or to submit comments, please e-mail Mike Hilton at: graphicrepro.za@gmail.com.

ValueCamp! — Zukunft Zeitung mit FDI Mainz:Wiesbaden Bild 1

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany. Photos: Laurenz Lin, Mainz.

 

Von Andreas Weber, CEO Value Communication AG

Das erste ValueCamp! Event in Mainz stellte ein spannendes Thema in den Fokus: Zukunft Zeitung. Eine exklusive Runde informierte und diskutierte. Vorausgegangen waren intensive Gespräche und ValueCheck!-Analysen, die beim ValueCamp! vorgestellt wurden.

Die Ergebnisse, die sich aus Value-Sicht ableiten lassen, im Überblick:

  1. Die Rede von der “Print-Krise” ist ein abstruses, dummes und kontraproduktives Ablenkungsmanöver der Medien- und Verlagszunft, unterstützt durch naiv-devote Fachmedien-Berichterstattungen und Lobbyisten. Hierzu gehört auch das Debakel rund um das von den Medien/Zeitungsverlagen durchgeboxte Leistungsschutzrecht. Die sinnlose Schlacht gegen Google (als bisherigem Partner und Profitlieferant für Online-Werbung auf Verlags-Websites) ist verloren, die Zeitungsverlage in Deutschland werden drastisch an Traffic auf ihren “Digitalangeboten” im Web verlieren.
  2. Es gibt also eine veritable “Zeitungs-Verleger”-Krise, die auf dem Rücken der Mitarbeiter und Leser ausgetragen wird. Und die die aktuellen Marktentwicklungen völlig falsch einschätzt.
  3. Junge Zielgruppen (19 bis 29) wenden sich ab, nicht weil sie kein Print mögen (im Gegenteil!), sondern weil ihr Bedürfnis nach langen Textstrecken, die lesenswert und relevant sind, aber bei Digitalen Angeboten verpönt sind, von Zeitungsverlegern nicht adäquat angeboten werden. Daher werden Blogs und alternative News-Angebote bevorzugt, vor allem auch zum Meinungsaustausch über News (siehe reddit.com).
  4. Der “Bildungsauftrag” der Zeitungsverlage, wie er in Schwellenländern rund um den Globus unabdingbar ist, wird in der ersten Welt nicht mehr wahrgenommen. (Von Ausnahmen abgesehen, siehe Die Zeit). Gemeint ist, dass der Leser an Themen herangeführt wird, die er von sich aus nicht als wichtig erahnen und erachten kann.
  5. Diese (von den Zeitungsverlegern hausgemachte) Krise ist nicht neu, sie existiert seit rund 30 Jahren, da Leserinteressen nicht nachgekommen wird, was empirisch nachweisbar ist. Die Redaktion bestimmt, was publiziert wird. Kontinuierliche Leserbefragungen oder auch Leserreporter sind die seltene Ausnahme (v. a. bei Axel Springer SE).
  6. Zwangsläufig ist die Krise daher eine Content-Krise der Verlage, die auf Geheiss der Verlagskaufleute statt Qualitäts-Journalismus nur noch Quoten-Journalismus liefern, koste es was wolle. Es lebe das Spektakuläre, auch wenn es die Tatsachen nicht mehr korrekt wieder gibt.
  7. Sowohl Leser als auch Werbekunden der Zeitungsverlage wenden sich ab, weil Zeitungen in dieser Machart keine Wirkungskraft mehr entfalten und Misstrauen stiften.
  8. Zeitungsverlage, die noch in ihrem Kerngeschäft kostendeckend arbeiten können, werden durch die herbeigeredete Krise unnötig geschwächt. Denn:
  9. Für Werbungtreibende und Markenunternehmen entsteht eine prekäre Situation, da es ausser TV keine relevanten, zuverlässigen reichweitenstarken Medien mehr gibt. Daher werden andere Direktwerbeformen bevorzugt, die kein klassisches Medium mehr benötigen, da sie Kommunikation und Transaktion nahtlos verknüpfen (Aussenwerbung, Direkt-/Dialogmarketing, POS-Werbung und zunehmend Interaktionen über Social Media Plattformen).
  10. Pikant: Die Zeitungsverleger wie alle klassischen News-Anbieter inkl. Reuters, BBC und CNN haben vor Twitter kapitulieren müssen. Twitter ist das schnellste und wirksamste “News-Medium” geworden — lokal, regional, national, global. Das Angebot der Zeitungsverleger wird allerdings nicht substituiert, sondern schlichtweg nicht mehr gebraucht.

Epilog: Dank an Michael Lattreuter, Andreas Kaufmann und Ulrich Smets, FDI-Bezirk Mainz / Wiesbaden, für das Zustandekommen der Expertenrunde. Und an Jörg Blumtritt alias @jbenno für seine fundierten Beiträge aus Sicht der Medienanalyse und Marktforschung.

Wir sind gespannt, wie die Reaktionen anderer Teilnehmer ausfallen. Und greifen die Meinung anderer gerne auf. Es darf und muss bei einem so wichtigen Thema offen und nachhaltig diskutiert werden.

 

Per Klick zur Video-Dokumantation (10 Minuten, die sich lohnen)

 

Impressionen: 

ValueCamp! — Zukunft Zeitung mit FDI Mainz:Wiesbaden Bild 2

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany. Photos: Laurenz Lin, Mainz.

 

Vortragscharts von Andreas Weber

 

Newspapers dead caused by publishers.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

By Sudarsha Rambaran, Value Art+Communication Fellow, Mainz
(This blog post is part of a new Value iBook “The Real Value of Print” which will be available soon)

 

ValueLearnings

• Beyond craziness? — The Woeful Tale of the Newspaper and its War with the Internet

• Publishers’ strange behavior (since decades): they ignore the needs of their customers

• The biggest enemy of print & publishing are newspaper publishers and their partners in the traditional media business

 

Five years ago, in an interview with Horizont, media expert and author of What would Google do?” Jeff Jarvis made some visionary comments about the future of the newspaper industry. He stated that society is being massively restructured because of the internet, however, Google is not the instigator of this process as many believe, but rather a result of it. These days, if you cannot be searched on the net, you cannot be found. The mass market for newspapers may be dead, but there is still a niche for them in the world. The news itself must change: it has to be tailored to target audiences, which is why regional newspapers can benefit so much from Google. Google itself is currently changing their whole marketing approach. They are concentrating on making the advertising relevant to local markets by personalizing the stories (nice example here). They no longer want to mass produce messages that work on a global level, and it’s working brilliantly!

The advantages of the online world for newspapers are many; low costs, cheap distribution, fast updates, and discussions with the readers. There was the nice example with the New York Times. They took down the paywall on their  site and their internet traffic rose by 40%, which started a snowball effect: they earned more money from advertisements, and they moved up the list on the Google search page, which led to even more readers.

Currently, the German regional newspapers are rebelling against Google, because they believe it doesn’t help their sites, especially on the Google News side. One prominent example of this is the “Braunschweiger Zeitung”, which has abandoned the Google News feature. Their  reasoning for this, in my opinion, made little sense: they wanted to show their confidence and independence from Google. They also want Google News to suffer for it; if many regional newspapers leave it, Google will have a problem. Yet in reality it would be their problem if they can’t be found! The whole story reminded me of this:

On the other hand, the Zeitung went about this in a clever way, as they started a massive marketing campaign in order to raise awareness and advertise the newspaper. However, They could have done the marketing campaign without leaving Google, and Google would only have supported it! The marketing campaign did increase the visits to their website by 27%, though, but I still don’t see how leaving Google helped with this.

So the big question we asked ourselves here was: why blame Google for the decline of the newspaper industry when all it’s doing is helping? (And why not Twitter, which would have made far more sense?). The facts:

  • Google is a great source of promotion. We send online news publishers a billion clicks a month from Google News and more than three billion extra visits from our other services, such as Web Search and iGoogle. That is 100,000 opportunities a minute to win loyal readers and generate revenue—for free.
  • In terms of copyright, another bone of contention, we only show a headline and a couple of lines from each story. If readers want to read on they have to click through to the newspaper’s Web site. (The exception are stories we host through a licensing agreement with news services.) And if they wish, publishers can remove their content from our search index, or from Google News.
  • The claim that we’re making big profits on the back of newspapers also misrepresents the reality. In search, we make our money primarily from advertisements for products. Someone types in digital camera and gets ads for digital cameras. A typical news search—for Afghanistan, say—may generate few if any ads. The revenue generated from the ads shown alongside news search queries is a tiny fraction of our search revenue.

Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google Inc, writing for the Wall Street Journal

It all speaks for itself, really. Readers also don’t necessarily want to read newspapers solely on digital platforms, as many in the newspaper industry fear. The actual percentage of people who do exclusively want digital content is at 10-12%.

“News is not one-size-fits-all” – Jeff Jarvis

The newspapers do not just have a problem with the Internet, they also have a content problem. They need to change their approach by tailoring news to target audiences rather than trying to reach everyone, which is why regional newspapers, like the Braunschweiger Zeitung are so important today. Dr. Andreas Vogel put it quite nicely in a study:

“Bloß die Verlage glauben, [dass sie] mit einem Einheitsprodukt alle Leser [gewinnen können]”

Roughly translated, this means that only the newspapers themselves believe that they can reach all types of readers by creating one mass product.

Dr. Vogel believes that one possible solution to this content problem is to differentiate the product by offering different versions of it. Not too many, however; perhaps three or four intelligently created versions, which can be decided on by polling the readers and asking them about their interests. These versions might be smaller/thinner than the original edition, and cheaper. This is a great idea, as it is more personal, which is so important these days, and it views the buyer as a reader/consumer. Many newspapers seem to ignore this; fact is, what might be academically recognized as quality journalism may not be something the reader can cohere. Newspapers need to connect to their readers, or at least write pieces that their readers can relate to.

Now back to the evil that is Google, according to publishing companies. A German organization, VG Media, own by a number of media companies like Axel Springer SE, sued Google for copyright reasons; they claimed that Google was stealing from them by showing short snippets of their articles on the search page. The result was a law, called the Leistungsschutzrecht, which forbids Google from showing these snippets (it is rather vaguely written, though). The result of all of this ridiculousness was this: October 1st, 2014, Google announced that it would no longer show the snippets, instead just the name of the article and maybe the author. They don’t even show the paper’s logo on the search page. And the papers are crying wolf at Google again. At the end of the day, what really happened is that the newspapers blamed Google for the problems they were having (and still are). They were simply afraid that Google was taking business away from them and thus making more money. Whereas in reality, Google only promoted and linked to their content, thus delivering readers to them on a silver platter! The PR brochure promoting this stated that “If someone wants to use our content, they have to ask.” It’s pretty easy translate this into what they really meant, and German blogger Stefan Niggemeier did so flawlessly: “Google must use it and pay”. Now Google isn’t using it or paying, and they’re left crying in the corner because they got what they wanted; Google doesn’t showcase their content anymore. And they will lose clicks.

Newspapers dead caused by publishers.001

ValueCheck! — Zeitung

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

By Sudarsha Rambaran, Value Art+Com Fellow, Mainz

 

ValueLearnings

• Learn why Google is de facto a vital source of promotion for newspapers, rather than “the enemy“.

• Newspapers no longer have a mass market, but a new niche. Discover it!

• What a lot of newspapers think Google is doing vs. what they are actually doing.

 

Five years ago, in an interview with Horizont, media expert and author of “What would Google do?” Jeff Jarvis made some visionary comments about the future of the newspaper industry. He stated that society is being massively restructured because of the internet, however, Google is not the instigator of this process as many believe, but rather a result of it. These days, if you cannot be searched on the net, you cannot be found. The mass market for newspapers may be dead, but there is still a niche for them in the world. The news itself must change: it has to be tailored to target audiences, which is why regional newspapers can benefit so much from Google. Google itself is currently changing their whole marketing approach. They are concentrating on making the advertising relevant to local markets by personalizing the stories (nice example here). They no longer want to mass produce messages that work on a global level, and it’s working brilliantly!

The advantages of the online world for newspapers are many; low costs, cheap distribution, fast updates, and discussions with the readers. There was the nice example with the New York Times. They took down the paywall on their site and their internet traffic rose by 40%, which started a snowball effect: they earned more money from advertisements, and they moved up the list on the Google search page, which led to even more readers.

Currently, the German regional newspapers are rebelling against Google, because they believe it doesn’t help their sites, especially on the Google News side. One prominent example of this is the “Braunschweiger Zeitung”, which has abandoned the Google News feature. Their reasoning for this, in my opinion, made little sense: they wanted to show their confidence and independence from Google. They also want Google News to suffer for it; if many regional newspapers leave it, Google will have a problem. Yet in reality it would be their problem if they can’t be found! The whole story reminded me of this:

On the other hand, the Zeitung went about this in a clever way, as they started a massive marketing campaign in order to raise awareness and advertise the newspaper. However, They could have done the marketing campaign without leaving Google, and Google would only have supported it! The marketing campaign did increase the visits to their website by 27%, though, but I still don’t see how leaving Google helped with this.

 

ValueCheck! — Zeitung Illustration.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

So the big question we asked ourselves here was: why blame Google for the decline of the newspaper industry when all it’s doing is helping? (And why not Twitter, which would have made far more sense?). The facts:

  • Google is a great source of promotion. We send online news publishers a billion clicks a month from Google News and more than three billion extra visits from our other services, such as Web Search and iGoogle. That is 100,000 opportunities a minute to win loyal readers and generate revenue—for free.
  • In terms of copyright, another bone of contention, we only show a headline and a couple of lines from each story. If readers want to read on they have to click through to the newspaper’s Web site. (The exception are stories we host through a licensing agreement with news services.) And if they wish, publishers can remove their content from our search index, or from Google News.
  • The claim that we’re making big profits on the back of newspapers also misrepresents the reality. In search, we make our money primarily from advertisements for products. Someone types in digital camera and gets ads for digital cameras. A typical news search—for Afghanistan, say—may generate few if any ads. The revenue generated from the ads shown alongside news search queries is a tiny fraction of our search revenue.

Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google Inc, writing for the Wall Street Journal

It all speaks for itself, really.

 

ValueCheck!
Please also check out Andreas Weber’s post, “Zeit-ung ist gleich Zeit-um?”, about a local newspaper here in Mainz, the Mainzer Allgemeine Zeitung!

 

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