Archive

Tag Archives: Print

ValueCheck! — Canon #InfoAtWork 26112014.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany Photos/Composing: Andreas Weber

 

Düsseldorf (Germany), 2. December 2014. Success from square one: Information at Work, the pan-European “Canon for Business” specialist conference, brought together more than 500 professionals from 13 different countries. 

“I am delighted with the highly competent, intelligent and perspicacious manner in which Canon has managed to bring together leading managers from various sectors and countries to discuss ideas affecting current and future developments in the field of digital information management. Well done!” was how the CEO of one data-analytics company rated the “InfoAtWork” conference held on 26th November 2014 in the German city of Düsseldorf.

Graham Page, Head of Information Management Business Development, welcomed – on behalf of Canon Europe – the more than 500 participants from 13 different countries to the InterContinental Hotel on Düsseldorf’s central boulevard, the Königsallee. He underlined the importance of tackling – in times of radical change – the most important subjects in hand, namely: to evaluate correctly data, information and knowledge; and apply them efficiently to all the needs of the business concerned. This is crucial for sustainable success, profitability and customer and employee satisfaction.

“Information is beautiful” 

London-based designer, IT journalist and bestselling author David McCandless guided the audience through the paradigm shift in the field of data analysis which has already taken place, in the sense of “data science” having taken over from “business intelligence”. Mr. McCandless brought the presentation to life with a series of interactive and informative graphics. The resulting “digital data storytelling” proved to be fascinating for all those present.

As Marc Bory, European Director Solutions & Managed Services at Canon Europe put it:

“The global volume of data handled by business organisations is growing at an annual rate of 56%.” This means that the volume of data doubles every 18 months. Canon has positioned itself as a provider of “one-stop shop” solutions for the management of data input, data processing and the distribution of data-driven documents to their corresponding addressees. Hans Kaashoek from Strategy Partners stressed the significance of data sharing, given that mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers are creating a gateway to the sharing economy. “Mobile is the new desktop” was this analyst’s way of putting it, referring to the stunning changes affecting both work and day-to-day life in general. Organisations of all types have had to adapt to this new culture of social media and sharing if they wish to survive.

 

Part of conference conducted by personal tablet

Canon provided all participants with the use of a tablet pc, with a view to focusing on social media communications as a complement to the conference’s main events. Participants were able to use the Canon App interactively for voting on the afternoon presentations above all, while using it to contact other colleagues present at the event.

The seminars were used to host high-level expert discussions on the hands-on application of practical ideas. The common thread running through these sessions was the automation of processes at all levels, i.e. including the automation of key information-handling procedures. Various Canon customers reported on the fast and completely trouble-free implementation of new P2P (purchase to pay) solutions, preceded by an analysis by Canon experts designed to make available – virtually overnight – an individual, 100%-correct solution.

Michael Bjerre Drohst, CFO of the Creativ Company, a Danish organisation, highlighted the optimised purchasing process made possible in this respect, and its effects, saying: “It was fantastic. It took just a few days for the smoothly implemented Canon solution to improve how we cope with the accounts of our approximately ten thousand suppliers. This took the pressure off us, allowing us to focus once more on our actual core task of putting new, strategically based ideas into practice.”  Similar success was reported by Erna van Laar, who turned to Canon to help implement a digital mailroom facility for all human resource-related tasks performed at Connexxion, a Netherlands-based transport company. All the processes concerned were optimised in just three months, with strict data-security maintained and to the satisfaction of the employees involved, while delivering considerable savings in terms of the corresponding return-on-investment period.

Innovation and expert knowledge are key factors

Process automation also requires a change of attitude to outsourcing. While the main issue in this respect was previously cost savings, the task has now moved on to how to take advantage of technological expertise and innovation. RPA (Robotic Process Automation) is not concerned with which service provider delivers the goods, but rather with how delivery by drone will become possible.

Rudolf Wolf from WWK Lebensversicherung showed how the automation of process-oriented document management is no longer a thing of science fiction. AS an insurance WWK generates 80 million pages of documents every year. These are supplied to customers as both physical printouts and digital files, all of which need to be correctly addressed and reliably delivered, even with wide seasonal fluctuations and high verification standards. These aspects were also stressed by Peter Paul Bos from PostNL, the Dutch post office service. Transaction-related documents such as payment reminders and invoices must be physically printed out and addressed, and also delivered as “smart” text messages or even, nowadays, sent as direct messages via Twitter. This was how Mr. Bos confirmed Canon’s approach: “Automated document management means bringing the entire information process of a business organisation under control – including all documents, all sources of information, all addressees and all relevant means of transport (in a similar way to their digital counterparts).”

Manuel Sánchez, European Solutions Marketing Professional, Canon Europe, concluded the event with a presentation on Canon solutions for Customer Communications Management. The focus in this respect is no longer on individual solutions in transactional and/or promotional terms, but rather on providing a consistent customer experience across all media channels. No type of data analysis should ever be an end in itself, but must rather always focus on the customer’s well-being and satisfaction. If this is not taken into account, the customer will soon go elsewhere.

Further information can be obtained via the Twitter hashtag #InfoAtWork or the Canon Business Hub at http://www.canon.de/business-bytes

Please check our Storify story as well:

ValueCheck! @Storify 26112014

ValueCheck! — Canon Roland Seeberger.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

Warum darf (gute) Kommunikation (k)eine Kunst sein?

  • Bislang bildeten Print und Publishing das Rückgrat guter Kommunikation, intern wie extern, die gute Dienstleistungsmöglichkeiten (für Dritte) notwendig machten.
  • Neue Formen des Informationsmanagements, beflügelt durch die digitale Transformation, stellen vieles, wenn nicht sogar alles auf den Kopf.
  • Social Platforms sind die Sieger, weil sofort messbar! Twitter wurde zum Leitmedium für qualifizierte Business News aller Art. Blogs liefern die Backgrounds. Facebook ermöglicht die besten spezifischen Interaktions- und Dokumentationsmöglichkeiten.

Gedanken von Andreas Weber im Hinblick auf #InfoAtWork, eine neue Fachveranstaltung von Canon Deutschland und Canon Europa Ende November 2014 in Düsseldorf. Im Fokus des Autors: Was passiert mit klassischer, Print-basierter Kommunikation, die massenmedial auf Push-Effekte zielt?

Ich kommuniziere, also sind wir. Eine einleuchtende Erkenntnis. Passt das ins Digitalzeitalter, einer Ära, die etabliertes Denken und Handeln über Bord zu werfen scheint? Ist tatsächlich alles anders, alles neu, alles unveränderlich verändert? Ja und nein. Ja, weil sich die technologische Basis für Kommunikation, die Art und Weise, wie wir interagieren, radikal verändert hat. Smart Technologies sind Schrittmacher, mobil, multimedial und rund um die Uhr nutzbar. Nein, weil sich das grundlegende Wertesystem, das gute Kommunikation ausmacht, niemals verändert. Kommunikation muss immer relevant, persönlich und wirksam sein.

Das Dilemma: Was für Konsumenten (z. B. Käufer des iPhone 6 mit Apple Pay; hier wurden in 72 Stunden über 1 Million Kreditkarten freigeschaltet!) schnell zur Selbstverständlichkeit wird, ist für Unternehmen oft eine lange Qual. Etablierte IT-Prozesse in Windeseile anzupassen, gelingt nur schwer.

Das Zeitalter der Kunden ist da!

Marktforscher von Forrester nennen die Jetztzeit „The Age of the Customer“. Der Mensch rückt in den Mittelpunkt. Mit Egozentrik hat dies wenig zu tun; vielmehr mit dem berechtigten Wunsch als Individuum wahrgenommen, aufmerksam und fürsorglich behandelt zu werden. Gerade dann, wenn wir Kunden sind, die für Waren oder Dienstleistungen Geld ausgeben. Dies erfordert seitens der Unternehmen eine komplette Erneuerung ihres Information Managements. Bis dato zählt, Kunden- wie auch Mitarbeiterkommunikation effizient und preiswert zu gestalten. Die Controller wachen darüber. Das Ziel lautet, Aufmerksamkeit und Leads zu generieren, damit der Vertrieb nacharbeiten kann. Diese Aufgabe wird immer schwieriger. Spricht man mit Medienexperten, wird eine simple Frage zur Herkulesaufgabe: „Wie macht man für Massenmarktprodukte wirksame Kommunikation?“ TV funktioniert noch. Die zweite Säule, Printmedien, allen voran die Zeitungen, stecken in einer Krise. Leser und Anzeigenkunden rennen davon.

Hoppla, das Neue ist schwierig! 

Neue Kommunikationsformen via Facebook, Instagram umd Co.  sind extrem erfolgreich; für Kommunikations-Traditionalisten aber schwierig zu handhaben, weil sie “beyond Targeting” auf Interaktion, Beziehungen, Prozessautomatisierung und Algorithmen beruhen, nicht auf bloßer Reichweite. Über 1,3 Milliarden Facebook-Nutzer auf einen Schlag zu erreichen, geht nicht, weil es von Konsumenten nicht gewollt ist. Online-Display-Werbung über Banner wird teurer, Wirkungseffekte sind schwieriger zu durchschauen. Google ist in der Lage, relevante Kommunikations-Lösungen zu bieten, die sich rechnen, weil sie schier unendliche Reichweiten mit direkter Interaktion und Transaktion koppeln. Vorausgesetzt, Inhalte und Botschaften stimmen. Alles, was Google bietet, liefert sofort (= automatisiert) Wirkungsnachweise. Ergebnisse sind blitzschnell ausgewertet.

Von all dem können diejenigen, die bislang auf klassische Kommunikationsformen und Werbung sowie primär auf Print- und Publishing-Aktivitäten vertrauen, nur träumen. Es ist nicht sofort messbar, was ein Druckprodukt oder das per Email versendete PDF leistet. Wird es angeschaut? Oder liegt es nur eine Weile unangetastet auf dem Tisch/Desktop, bevor es im Papierkorb landet? Response-Effekte über QR-Codes reichen nicht aus, da nur punktuell messbar. Printmedien können nicht in Echtzeit Daten liefern, welche ihrer Botschaften oder Stories von wem wann gelesen wird. Erfasst wird höchstens, ob ein Printprodukt zugestellt oder gekauft wurde. Marktforschung ist retrospektiv, dauert Wochen und Monate. Das gilt für fast jedes Druckprodukt. Der Betreiber eines Online-Blogs oder einer Community-Site hat es besser; er kann kostenfrei sofort Statistiken oder Kommentare bekommen, die ihn informieren und helfen, das Inhalte-Angebot zu verbessern. Printproduzenten und deren Auftraggeber gucken dagegen in die Röhre. Und sind hoffnungslos überfordert, wie Kommunikation und Transaktion nahtlos gekoppelt werden können. 

Die Zukunft von Print und Publishing “re-loaded”: Mit neuen, IT-getriebenen, sozial vernetzten Kommunikationslösungen die Lücke schließen zwischen realer Welt und der virtuellen Erscheinungsform von Inhalten aller Art. Das funktioniert technisch längst schon. Man denke nur an Web-to-Print-Lösungen auf Konsumenten-Ebene (C-toC), um z. B. Facebook-Chroniken oder Wikipedia-Inhalte einfach und per Mausklick in Publikationen zu verwandeln, die über Nacht gedruckt und versendet werden. Auf B-to-B- wie auch auf B-to-C-Ebene ist man noch weit davon entfernt. Weil das Denken von etablierten Strukturen und IT-Prozessen diktiert wird. Zeit, das zu ändern, gerade hierzulande bei DAX-Konzernen und im Mittelstand, die in ihrem Börsen-/Unternehmenswert den Digitalfirmen hinterherhinken. Nicht nur relativ, sondern absolut. — Wie gesagt: Ich kommuniziere (werthaltig), also sind wir (profitabel)! 

Ausblick: Alles wird gut, wenn wir aus etwas Altem etwas Neues formen. Die Werte der Gutenberg-Galaxis sind noch immer gültig und beflügeln die Kunst der Kommunikation. Das wurde vor allem im November 2014 im Rahmen der Canon for Business Initiative im Team mit hochkarätige Experten beim ersten #InfoAtWork-Event in Deutschland deutlich. Siehe dazu unser Value Resümee und die Echtzeit-Doku sowie den Kommentar von Jörg Blumtritt (@jbenno).

Lesetip für IT, Marketing und Financial Community:
Canon Business Bytes mit fundierten Fachartikeln zum Thema Information Management!

ValueCamp! — Zukunft Zeitung mit FDI Mainz:Wiesbaden Bild 1

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany. Photos: Laurenz Lin, Mainz.

 

Von Andreas Weber, CEO Value Communication AG

Das erste ValueCamp! Event in Mainz stellte ein spannendes Thema in den Fokus: Zukunft Zeitung. Eine exklusive Runde informierte und diskutierte. Vorausgegangen waren intensive Gespräche und ValueCheck!-Analysen, die beim ValueCamp! vorgestellt wurden.

Die Ergebnisse, die sich aus Value-Sicht ableiten lassen, im Überblick:

  1. Die Rede von der “Print-Krise” ist ein abstruses, dummes und kontraproduktives Ablenkungsmanöver der Medien- und Verlagszunft, unterstützt durch naiv-devote Fachmedien-Berichterstattungen und Lobbyisten. Hierzu gehört auch das Debakel rund um das von den Medien/Zeitungsverlagen durchgeboxte Leistungsschutzrecht. Die sinnlose Schlacht gegen Google (als bisherigem Partner und Profitlieferant für Online-Werbung auf Verlags-Websites) ist verloren, die Zeitungsverlage in Deutschland werden drastisch an Traffic auf ihren “Digitalangeboten” im Web verlieren.
  2. Es gibt also eine veritable “Zeitungs-Verleger”-Krise, die auf dem Rücken der Mitarbeiter und Leser ausgetragen wird. Und die die aktuellen Marktentwicklungen völlig falsch einschätzt.
  3. Junge Zielgruppen (19 bis 29) wenden sich ab, nicht weil sie kein Print mögen (im Gegenteil!), sondern weil ihr Bedürfnis nach langen Textstrecken, die lesenswert und relevant sind, aber bei Digitalen Angeboten verpönt sind, von Zeitungsverlegern nicht adäquat angeboten werden. Daher werden Blogs und alternative News-Angebote bevorzugt, vor allem auch zum Meinungsaustausch über News (siehe reddit.com).
  4. Der “Bildungsauftrag” der Zeitungsverlage, wie er in Schwellenländern rund um den Globus unabdingbar ist, wird in der ersten Welt nicht mehr wahrgenommen. (Von Ausnahmen abgesehen, siehe Die Zeit). Gemeint ist, dass der Leser an Themen herangeführt wird, die er von sich aus nicht als wichtig erahnen und erachten kann.
  5. Diese (von den Zeitungsverlegern hausgemachte) Krise ist nicht neu, sie existiert seit rund 30 Jahren, da Leserinteressen nicht nachgekommen wird, was empirisch nachweisbar ist. Die Redaktion bestimmt, was publiziert wird. Kontinuierliche Leserbefragungen oder auch Leserreporter sind die seltene Ausnahme (v. a. bei Axel Springer SE).
  6. Zwangsläufig ist die Krise daher eine Content-Krise der Verlage, die auf Geheiss der Verlagskaufleute statt Qualitäts-Journalismus nur noch Quoten-Journalismus liefern, koste es was wolle. Es lebe das Spektakuläre, auch wenn es die Tatsachen nicht mehr korrekt wieder gibt.
  7. Sowohl Leser als auch Werbekunden der Zeitungsverlage wenden sich ab, weil Zeitungen in dieser Machart keine Wirkungskraft mehr entfalten und Misstrauen stiften.
  8. Zeitungsverlage, die noch in ihrem Kerngeschäft kostendeckend arbeiten können, werden durch die herbeigeredete Krise unnötig geschwächt. Denn:
  9. Für Werbungtreibende und Markenunternehmen entsteht eine prekäre Situation, da es ausser TV keine relevanten, zuverlässigen reichweitenstarken Medien mehr gibt. Daher werden andere Direktwerbeformen bevorzugt, die kein klassisches Medium mehr benötigen, da sie Kommunikation und Transaktion nahtlos verknüpfen (Aussenwerbung, Direkt-/Dialogmarketing, POS-Werbung und zunehmend Interaktionen über Social Media Plattformen).
  10. Pikant: Die Zeitungsverleger wie alle klassischen News-Anbieter inkl. Reuters, BBC und CNN haben vor Twitter kapitulieren müssen. Twitter ist das schnellste und wirksamste “News-Medium” geworden — lokal, regional, national, global. Das Angebot der Zeitungsverleger wird allerdings nicht substituiert, sondern schlichtweg nicht mehr gebraucht.

Epilog: Dank an Michael Lattreuter, Andreas Kaufmann und Ulrich Smets, FDI-Bezirk Mainz / Wiesbaden, für das Zustandekommen der Expertenrunde. Und an Jörg Blumtritt alias @jbenno für seine fundierten Beiträge aus Sicht der Medienanalyse und Marktforschung.

Wir sind gespannt, wie die Reaktionen anderer Teilnehmer ausfallen. Und greifen die Meinung anderer gerne auf. Es darf und muss bei einem so wichtigen Thema offen und nachhaltig diskutiert werden.

 

Per Klick zur Video-Dokumantation (10 Minuten, die sich lohnen)

 

Impressionen: 

ValueCamp! — Zukunft Zeitung mit FDI Mainz:Wiesbaden Bild 2

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany. Photos: Laurenz Lin, Mainz.

 

Vortragscharts von Andreas Weber

 

Value Art+Com Trailer Thumbnail YouTube

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

Von Andreas Weber, CEO Value Communication AG, Founder and publisher Edition Value Art+Com | Video-Animation: Laurenz Sill, Mainz

 

Die Edition Value Art+Com beschreitet Neuland. Wir publizieren nicht nur. Wir kommunizieren, interagieren und schaffen Neues. Im Team mit den besten kreativen Köpfen.

›Art and Artists need good Communicators!‹ — Wir bieten Kunst und Künstlern eine zeitgemäße mediale Bühne.

Wir schaffen für Künstler eine umfassende, stimmige und kommunikativ-mediale Inszenierung, die ihre Kunst und ihre Persönlichkeit in den Fokus nimmt und ihnen eine außergewöhnliche Wirkungskraft verleiht: Mit hochwertigem, digital gedrucktem Exklusiv-Buch, eBook, Posterbüchern, Blogposts, Videoanimationen und professionellem Social-Media-Support via Facebook, Google+, YouTube und Twitter.

Unsere Value Art+Com-Publikationen sind rund um die Uhr lokal, national und weltweit zugänglich.

We proudly present:

„InSightOut — Dietmar Gross  Malerei“

Die umfassende, gleichnamige Kunstausstellung im Osthaus Museum Hagen bot beste Gelegenheit, Themen aus dem Werk des renommierten Künstlers zu selektieren, speziell zu arrangieren und kommunikativ empathisch in Szene zu setzen.

„Meine Malerei ist authentisch!“, sagt der Künstler über sich selbst. Recht hat er! — Und das haben wir als Leitmotiv seiner Inszenierung aufgegriffen und verlängern die Erlebnismöglichkeit seiner Kunst über die Ausstellungszeit hinaus.

Das Besondere an der Kunst von Dietmar Gross, die malerische Vollendung seiner Gemälde, machen wir mit der Edition Value Art+Com unverfälscht auf höchstem Qualitätsniveau analog und digital anschaulich und zugänglich. Und das nicht nur für Ausstellungsbesucher, sondern für alle, die sich vor, während und nach der Ausstellung interessieren und durch Publikationen individuell erleben wollen! — Nicht mehr, nicht weniger.

 

 

Die Publikationen im Überblick:

 

Weitere mediale Neuschöpfungen folgen bis zur Eröffnung der Ausstellung am 15. November 2014, 16 Uhr im Osthaus Museum Hagen.

Gäste sind herzlich willkommen und sollten sich überraschen lassen. Einladung siehe unten.

 

Wer sich Verschiedenes anschauen möchte, kann nachfolgende Links anklicken:

http://value-art-com.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/insightout-dietmar-gross-malerei-vorzugsausgabe-subskriptions-angebot-bis-31-10-2014

http://youtu.be/qJ2rSqFd7bI?list=UUIn4XcTA7c3o0g5PZwFG8pg

https://www.facebook.com/valueartcom

http://valuetrendradar.com/2014/09/20/value-artcom-insightout-intermediale-publikation-zur-malerei-ausstellung-von-dietmar-gross-in-hagen/

 

 

Zusammenfassung aktueller Social Media Tweets (Posts):

 

Screenshot Storify 01112014

 

Newspapers dead caused by publishers.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

By Sudarsha Rambaran, Value Art+Communication Fellow, Mainz
(This blog post is part of a new Value iBook “The Real Value of Print” which will be available soon)

 

ValueLearnings

• Beyond craziness? — The Woeful Tale of the Newspaper and its War with the Internet

• Publishers’ strange behavior (since decades): they ignore the needs of their customers

• The biggest enemy of print & publishing are newspaper publishers and their partners in the traditional media business

 

Five years ago, in an interview with Horizont, media expert and author of What would Google do?” Jeff Jarvis made some visionary comments about the future of the newspaper industry. He stated that society is being massively restructured because of the internet, however, Google is not the instigator of this process as many believe, but rather a result of it. These days, if you cannot be searched on the net, you cannot be found. The mass market for newspapers may be dead, but there is still a niche for them in the world. The news itself must change: it has to be tailored to target audiences, which is why regional newspapers can benefit so much from Google. Google itself is currently changing their whole marketing approach. They are concentrating on making the advertising relevant to local markets by personalizing the stories (nice example here). They no longer want to mass produce messages that work on a global level, and it’s working brilliantly!

The advantages of the online world for newspapers are many; low costs, cheap distribution, fast updates, and discussions with the readers. There was the nice example with the New York Times. They took down the paywall on their  site and their internet traffic rose by 40%, which started a snowball effect: they earned more money from advertisements, and they moved up the list on the Google search page, which led to even more readers.

Currently, the German regional newspapers are rebelling against Google, because they believe it doesn’t help their sites, especially on the Google News side. One prominent example of this is the “Braunschweiger Zeitung”, which has abandoned the Google News feature. Their  reasoning for this, in my opinion, made little sense: they wanted to show their confidence and independence from Google. They also want Google News to suffer for it; if many regional newspapers leave it, Google will have a problem. Yet in reality it would be their problem if they can’t be found! The whole story reminded me of this:

On the other hand, the Zeitung went about this in a clever way, as they started a massive marketing campaign in order to raise awareness and advertise the newspaper. However, They could have done the marketing campaign without leaving Google, and Google would only have supported it! The marketing campaign did increase the visits to their website by 27%, though, but I still don’t see how leaving Google helped with this.

So the big question we asked ourselves here was: why blame Google for the decline of the newspaper industry when all it’s doing is helping? (And why not Twitter, which would have made far more sense?). The facts:

  • Google is a great source of promotion. We send online news publishers a billion clicks a month from Google News and more than three billion extra visits from our other services, such as Web Search and iGoogle. That is 100,000 opportunities a minute to win loyal readers and generate revenue—for free.
  • In terms of copyright, another bone of contention, we only show a headline and a couple of lines from each story. If readers want to read on they have to click through to the newspaper’s Web site. (The exception are stories we host through a licensing agreement with news services.) And if they wish, publishers can remove their content from our search index, or from Google News.
  • The claim that we’re making big profits on the back of newspapers also misrepresents the reality. In search, we make our money primarily from advertisements for products. Someone types in digital camera and gets ads for digital cameras. A typical news search—for Afghanistan, say—may generate few if any ads. The revenue generated from the ads shown alongside news search queries is a tiny fraction of our search revenue.

Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google Inc, writing for the Wall Street Journal

It all speaks for itself, really. Readers also don’t necessarily want to read newspapers solely on digital platforms, as many in the newspaper industry fear. The actual percentage of people who do exclusively want digital content is at 10-12%.

“News is not one-size-fits-all” – Jeff Jarvis

The newspapers do not just have a problem with the Internet, they also have a content problem. They need to change their approach by tailoring news to target audiences rather than trying to reach everyone, which is why regional newspapers, like the Braunschweiger Zeitung are so important today. Dr. Andreas Vogel put it quite nicely in a study:

“Bloß die Verlage glauben, [dass sie] mit einem Einheitsprodukt alle Leser [gewinnen können]”

Roughly translated, this means that only the newspapers themselves believe that they can reach all types of readers by creating one mass product.

Dr. Vogel believes that one possible solution to this content problem is to differentiate the product by offering different versions of it. Not too many, however; perhaps three or four intelligently created versions, which can be decided on by polling the readers and asking them about their interests. These versions might be smaller/thinner than the original edition, and cheaper. This is a great idea, as it is more personal, which is so important these days, and it views the buyer as a reader/consumer. Many newspapers seem to ignore this; fact is, what might be academically recognized as quality journalism may not be something the reader can cohere. Newspapers need to connect to their readers, or at least write pieces that their readers can relate to.

Now back to the evil that is Google, according to publishing companies. A German organization, VG Media, own by a number of media companies like Axel Springer SE, sued Google for copyright reasons; they claimed that Google was stealing from them by showing short snippets of their articles on the search page. The result was a law, called the Leistungsschutzrecht, which forbids Google from showing these snippets (it is rather vaguely written, though). The result of all of this ridiculousness was this: October 1st, 2014, Google announced that it would no longer show the snippets, instead just the name of the article and maybe the author. They don’t even show the paper’s logo on the search page. And the papers are crying wolf at Google again. At the end of the day, what really happened is that the newspapers blamed Google for the problems they were having (and still are). They were simply afraid that Google was taking business away from them and thus making more money. Whereas in reality, Google only promoted and linked to their content, thus delivering readers to them on a silver platter! The PR brochure promoting this stated that “If someone wants to use our content, they have to ask.” It’s pretty easy translate this into what they really meant, and German blogger Stefan Niggemeier did so flawlessly: “Google must use it and pay”. Now Google isn’t using it or paying, and they’re left crying in the corner because they got what they wanted; Google doesn’t showcase their content anymore. And they will lose clicks.

Newspapers dead caused by publishers.001

ValueCheck! — Zeitung

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

By Sudarsha Rambaran, Value Art+Com Fellow, Mainz

 

ValueLearnings

• Learn why Google is de facto a vital source of promotion for newspapers, rather than “the enemy“.

• Newspapers no longer have a mass market, but a new niche. Discover it!

• What a lot of newspapers think Google is doing vs. what they are actually doing.

 

Five years ago, in an interview with Horizont, media expert and author of “What would Google do?” Jeff Jarvis made some visionary comments about the future of the newspaper industry. He stated that society is being massively restructured because of the internet, however, Google is not the instigator of this process as many believe, but rather a result of it. These days, if you cannot be searched on the net, you cannot be found. The mass market for newspapers may be dead, but there is still a niche for them in the world. The news itself must change: it has to be tailored to target audiences, which is why regional newspapers can benefit so much from Google. Google itself is currently changing their whole marketing approach. They are concentrating on making the advertising relevant to local markets by personalizing the stories (nice example here). They no longer want to mass produce messages that work on a global level, and it’s working brilliantly!

The advantages of the online world for newspapers are many; low costs, cheap distribution, fast updates, and discussions with the readers. There was the nice example with the New York Times. They took down the paywall on their site and their internet traffic rose by 40%, which started a snowball effect: they earned more money from advertisements, and they moved up the list on the Google search page, which led to even more readers.

Currently, the German regional newspapers are rebelling against Google, because they believe it doesn’t help their sites, especially on the Google News side. One prominent example of this is the “Braunschweiger Zeitung”, which has abandoned the Google News feature. Their reasoning for this, in my opinion, made little sense: they wanted to show their confidence and independence from Google. They also want Google News to suffer for it; if many regional newspapers leave it, Google will have a problem. Yet in reality it would be their problem if they can’t be found! The whole story reminded me of this:

On the other hand, the Zeitung went about this in a clever way, as they started a massive marketing campaign in order to raise awareness and advertise the newspaper. However, They could have done the marketing campaign without leaving Google, and Google would only have supported it! The marketing campaign did increase the visits to their website by 27%, though, but I still don’t see how leaving Google helped with this.

 

ValueCheck! — Zeitung Illustration.001

© 2014 by Value Communication AG, Mainz/Germany

 

So the big question we asked ourselves here was: why blame Google for the decline of the newspaper industry when all it’s doing is helping? (And why not Twitter, which would have made far more sense?). The facts:

  • Google is a great source of promotion. We send online news publishers a billion clicks a month from Google News and more than three billion extra visits from our other services, such as Web Search and iGoogle. That is 100,000 opportunities a minute to win loyal readers and generate revenue—for free.
  • In terms of copyright, another bone of contention, we only show a headline and a couple of lines from each story. If readers want to read on they have to click through to the newspaper’s Web site. (The exception are stories we host through a licensing agreement with news services.) And if they wish, publishers can remove their content from our search index, or from Google News.
  • The claim that we’re making big profits on the back of newspapers also misrepresents the reality. In search, we make our money primarily from advertisements for products. Someone types in digital camera and gets ads for digital cameras. A typical news search—for Afghanistan, say—may generate few if any ads. The revenue generated from the ads shown alongside news search queries is a tiny fraction of our search revenue.

Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google Inc, writing for the Wall Street Journal

It all speaks for itself, really.

 

ValueCheck!
Please also check out Andreas Weber’s post, “Zeit-ung ist gleich Zeit-um?”, about a local newspaper here in Mainz, the Mainzer Allgemeine Zeitung!

 

Value Art+VCom | ValueCheck Bruno k. Ingelheim.003

 

Inszenierung einer Eröffnungsrede zu Bruno K. am 11. September 2014 in Ingelheim

Von Andreas Weber, Mainz

 

Einfache Frage:

Wer bin ich? — Experte für Kunst + Kommunikation, Beirats-Mitglied im Vorstand des Kunstverein Eisenturm, dem KEM, sozusagen Geburtshelfer des Kunstverein Ingelheim und der Ausstellung hier. Hebamme ist aber Dietmar Gross…

 

Offene Frage: 

Wer ist dieser Bruno K.? Was soll das hier, was er mit uns veranstaltet?

Und wo überhaupt liegt VOLXHEIM, wo er lebt und arbeitet? Ingelheim ist ja schon schwierig genug zu finden, für uns Grossstädter…

Oh je, das macht Ärger. Aufregung. Sorgen. Kummer. Verzweiflung. — Panikidee: Du kommst gar nicht erst. Das fällt in dem Chaos in der Binger Str. 26 gar nicht auf. — Doofe Idee. Ich hatte es Dietmar Gross versprochen.

Also doch auf nach Ingelheim. Aber noch mehr Fragen …

  1. Was zieh ich denn bloß an, wenn ich vor Publikum in einem Abrisshaus reden soll? Brauche ich einen Schutzhelm?
  2. Warum denn ausgerechnet Ingelheim?
  3. Warum ausgerechnet dieses Datum 11.9.? An dem ausgerechnet der Joachim Fuchsberger hochbetagt verstorben ist? Und mir/uns nicht mehr mit seiner Klugheit beiseite stehen kann oder will…
  4. Was soll überhaupt dieser merkwürdige Ausstellungs-Titel?

Saalwächter 20/14 — Eine skulpturale Intervention? 

Diese Wortkombi kennt noch nicht mal mein Rechtsschreibhilfeprogramm am iMac. — Ist Intervention nicht, was unser Aussenminister Steinmeier ständig macht, wie einige vor ihm auch schon? — Kommt dann am Ende noch der Putin und annektiert Ingelheim oder gar Rheinhessen?

 

Skulpturale geht ja noch: Steht sogar im Duden.

„in der Art, der Form einer Skulptur”

Beispiel

skulpturale Formen“

Das Wort kann man sogar trennen.

 

Und Intervention? —  steht für:

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Liebes Publikum: Wer rettet mich/uns? Oder hilft uns/mir aus?

Mich quält, nein ich hatte schlaflose Nächte. Ständig erschien mir im Traum mein Kunstgeschichts-Professor Imiela und frotzelt-blöckt: „Weber, was haben Sie sich denn dabei schon wieder Gedacht? Es geht immer um hehre Kunst!“ — Oh je, Oh je, Oh je. — Ich sah schon den von Hans-Jürgen Imiela hoch geschätzten Julius Meier-Graefe im Grab rotieren.

Meine Damen und Herren. Alles QUATSCH! Lassen Sie sich von mir nicht ins Boxhorn jagen. 

Ich habe erstens eine Überdosis Psychopharmaka genommen. Und seitdem freue ich mich heute hier zu sein. Und zu reden. Und zu gucken.

Und um Ihnen zu gestehen, dass ich gerne in Ingelheim bin, hier vor 8 Jahren im Alten Rathaus eine wundervolle Guido Ludes Ausstellung eröffnen durfte.

Und dass ich Bruno K. gegoogelt und gescreent habe. — Er ist mehr als OK. Erist ein Ausnahmetalent. Er ist ein Künstler, der alles im Blick hat. Er gestaltet Kunst und inszeniert sie wie kein Zweiter. Er macht dies seit Jahrzehnten und wandelt zwischen „Retro“ und dem heute. — Er hat eine solide Bildhauer-Ausbildung bei Michael Croissant zum Bildhauer absolviert. War Assistent bei Leo Kornbrust. Beide sind mir seit Kindheitstagen bekannt und ich verbriefe mich für sie. — Also warum nicht auch für Bruno K.?

Ich möchte Ihnen etwas vorlesen. Und gestehen: ich war genau vor einer Woche schon mal hier. Mit einem Gast aus Istanbul, Şükran Ceren Salalı, einer jungen, hochtalentierten Fachfrau für Kommunikation, Kino und Kunst.

 

Deutsche Fassung des ValueCheck! von Şükran Ceren Salalı, Value Art+Com Fellow,
— her preview experience, September 4th., 2014 (Übersetzt von Andreas Weber)

„Für mich war der Zeitpunkt gekommen, meine Abreise aus Mainz vorzubereiten. Dazu gehörte, noch einige Orte in der Region zu sehen, die bislang fehlten. Zufall oder nicht, Andreas Weber hatte die Idee, eine kurze  Fahrt nach und durch Rheinhessen zu unternehmen, um währenddessen die Zeit meines Aufenthaltes, die damit verbundenen Erfahrungen und die Ergebnisse unserer Projektarbeiten im Rahmen meiner Erasmus Internship abschließend zu besprechen.

Auf unserem Weg durch die wunderbaren Landschaften Rheinhessens, durchfuhren wir einige Orte und landeten (für mich unvermittelt) in Ingelheim. Wir hielten an einem besonderen Gebäude an, das wie eine Mischung aus Weinlager und Weinfabrik aussah. Dort trafen wir Bruno K. alias Bruno Kleber, einen Künstler, der eine für mich disruptive Art und Weise pflegt, Kunst zu schaffen. Und das seit über 30 Jahren. Die jetzige, hiesige für mich überraschende Ausstellung “Saalwächter 20/14 — Eine skulpturale Intervention”, die vom 11. September bis 12. Oktober 2014 im neuen temporären Ambiente des Kunstvereins Ingelheim stattfindet, verändert die Räumlichkeiten, indem sie transformiert werden. Und das in einer Art und Weise wie ich das noch nie sehen konnte.

Als erste Besucher einer Ausstellung, die noch nicht eröffnet, also noch “under construction” war, konnten wir beeindruckende Installation sehen. Und wir konnten persönlich mit Bruno K. sprechen, der sehr charmant, voller Ideen und humorvoll ist. Im Zentrum: Eine Weinabfülllagerhalle, nun Raketenbasis — die Werk- und Arbeitsräume werden in eine wundervolle Atmosphäre versetzt, die alle Räume erfasst und künstlerisch transformiert. Damit erreicht der Kunstverein Ingelheim aus dem Stand heraus das Premium-Niveau eines “Art Centers”. Das Gebäude verfügt über zahlreichen Räume (über mehre Etagen verteilt), die Bruno K. mit unterschiedlichen Themenideen bestückt, um- und ausgestaltet. Oft mit Versatzstücken aus dem Soldatenmilieu und Militärbereich. Zum Beispiel widmet er in der grossen Halle unter dem utopischen Namen “Apollonia” (gegenüber der faszinierenden Figur der Olga!) in eine Ragte mit Abschussbasis um, wobei man nur den ganz unteren, kleinen Teil der Rakete sehen kann. Alles ist umgeben mit militärisch anmutendem Equipment. Jedes Detail stellt aber einen künstlerisch geprägten Inhalt dar, verstärkt durch Sound Systeme, die zum Beispiel Melodien von alten Western Filmen wieder geben. Es bleibt aber nicht nur bei Klangeffekten, der Künstler setzt mit hohem Geschick die unterschiedlichsten wirkungsstarken Beleuchtungseffekte ein.

Es lohnt sich diese disruptive Kunstauffassungen, das disruptive Kunstschaffen mit einer wundervollen Sammlung von Installationen im Raum (und in einem Ensemble von Räumen) im Detail zu erkunden und zu erleben. Bruno K.’s Ausstellung wird der außergewöhnlichen, inspirierenden und letztlich ungewöhnlichen sowie einzigartigen Umgebung gerecht. — Sorry, dass ich nicht selbst bei der Eröffnung dabei sein kann. Ich musste schon nach Istanbul reisen. Genießen Sie es und lassen Sie sich inspirieren. — Dankeschön. Tschüss. Vielleicht bin ich ja bald wieder zurück!“

 

Was kann ich noch tun, da mir jetzt vor Aufregung und Ergriffenheit die Worte fehlen — und ich soll ja hoer sprechen zu Ihnen, möglichst klug und passend. Nun,  ich darf dem werten Künstler mein Redemanuskript überreichen, damit er noch etwas vernünftiges vortragen kann, das zu seiner Ausstellung passt. Und an die wunderbare Kunst des Dr. François Lachenal erinnert, meinem väterlichen Freund, der mich als Student mitunter mitarbeiten ließ, der die Internationalen Ingelheimer Tage im letzten Jahrtausend stets zu Höhenflügen geführt hat.

So, lieber Bruno, jetzt mach, lese bitte meine (im Stil des humorvollen François L.) gefasste Rede vor, damit die Leute noch was gescheites hören ausser meinem Gejammer. Da es ein toller, geistreicher Redetext ist, habe ich ihn gleich in einem verstaubten alten Rähmchen eingeglast. Zum an die Wand hängen.  Bitte schön, lieber Bruno…

 

Hier klicken, um die erste Value Art+Com Kurz-Doku anzuschauen!

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,274 other followers